Jump to content

Would HHA agency accept me for training if I am in a homeless shelter?

Posted
by flod flod Member

I think I would like to be in homeless shelter because if I get a room at $600 I might run out of room fast.

Could that be a problem when I apply for getting training for HHA?

Sorry to hear about your situation. The answer is no, that should not be a problem. For any schooling, training, etc. it is only necessary that you provide a mailing address. You could either provide the address to the shelter (they won't know its a shelter unless they were to look up the address) or provide a mailing address of a friend or relative for registration and paperwork purposes. Good luck.

Gentleman_nurse, MSN

Specializes in Behavioral health.

Flod I don't understand your Question. Do you mean you want live in homeless shelter because it's affordable or you're already there and concerned about finding work?

If you already live in a shelter (used to work in one for families, looked exactly like a hotel, very nice) finding work should not be a problem. Heck the staff will support you to make it happen. I highly suggest to get a Post Office Box for secure and timely mail delivery.

If you want to live in one (life happens be it disaster, domestic violence, or job loss) they have folks there who will assist you find affordable housing.

Edited by Gentleman_nurse

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

Job training programs do Not discriminate based on housing situation. However homeless shelters are for people in real need, not just people trying to save money. To be accepted to homeless shelter system you have to go to the central which is the PATH Center in the BX. They do a thorough investigation before they accept people to live in homeless shelter for more than a few days. I know several clients back when i used to work in Social Services that were rejected from shelter system. I would suggesting getting any job to pay your living expenses until you can start HHA job or living with family or friends until you can move out.

What if you are arriving at NYC with no money, is that sufficient reason for admittance?

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

No. If you just coming to NYC because you want to be in NYC they will send you back to whatever state you came from, either to your family member or friend. The homeless system is already overwhelmed with city residents with no home and the lists for housing are long. I see on another thread that you have a Bachelor's degree? You should apply to jobs and then move here once you are hired so you can rent a room (depends on neighborhood, you can rent a room for $450 and up a month) and survive on your own. If you do not have a Bachelor's you can still apply for jobs, some only require HS or GED. FYI homeless shelters are not luxury, think if you will be comfortable and happy possible living with roaches and mice and in crowded buildings.

Many homeless avoid homeless shelters because they do not want to be the victims of crime. These places are not safe.

For an address, many homeless get a postal mail box and write the address as a traditional address, leaving out the "PMB" designation. Homeless people have been doing this for years. Another homeless trick is to maintain a membership at 24 Hour Fitness or another all hours establishment and take care of your shower and personal hygiene after your workout. If you are friendly with the night staff, they will often allow you to "hang out" there through the night.

It is not a good idea to be telling people about your business, in this case, the fact that you are homeless. You don't need the possible or probable drama that can ensue when people find out that they have been told something they can use against you or something they can gossip about.

Nobody need know that you are homeless. Show up where and when you are supposed to and make sure that you are clean and presentable and you are just like any other worker or student.

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 11 years experience.

Wanting to be in a homeless shelter to save money by choice especially with a bachelors degree is not going to fly well in NYC. You likely won't qualify for more than a bus ticket back to your home state. What state are you in now? With a bachelors you may not qualify for free training. The agency may require a physical address for the background check process.

While some of the shelters are quite nice they are not intended to be free housing for someone moving to the city from out of state. They are a temporary measure until someone who fell on hard times gets back on their feet.

Edited by JustBeachyNurse

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

It is not fair to real homeless people for a person who can first apply to a job before moving here, to just move here without a job and expect to have a space in a shelter just to not pay for housing. Makes no sense to do so. Imagine if everyone that wanted to move to NYC would go to a shelter just to not pay housing until they get a job? The shelters would burst. If you are really homeless at this time try the Homeless Services in your current state. They can help as much as any other states Homeless Services can.

I'm not homeless here because I'm living with my family. But there are no jobs here, so if I move to a place with the most likelihood of finding a job, I won't have money for a room at least initially.

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

Then you are not eligible for homeless shelter...you have a home even though it is not in NY. The homeless shelters are for people with NO home Anywhere. Also it appears that you have a Bachelor's degree; not sure in what , but still it should help you get a better paying job than HHA. FYI HHA pay is low, about $10 an hour and they would not hire people with Bachelor degree as they are overqualified. I would advise that you have someone help you with your resume and interview (maybe your state or town's Workforce Center as it is their job to help unemployed people prepare and job search and they also have listing of jobs they can send you to interview for). If you really want NY, then you can apply to jobs here and move here After you have a job secured so you can rent a room for yourself.

If you are really interested in nursing, once you have a job here you an take a 6 week CNA class and then look for a CNA job. CNA pays better than HHA and will help u alot more in getting an RN job than HHA, as per people I know who worked these jobs. Of course while looking for CNA job, stay employed in whatever job you are in. You cannot qualify for homeless shelter b/c you quit your job to search for CNA job and its taking you some time to find one.

FYI HHA pay is low, about $10 an hour and they would not hire people with Bachelor degree as they are overqualified.

Is it true they won't hire people with Bachelor's degree?

Minimum wage jobs do hire people with Bachelor's degree so why not HHA jobs?

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 11 years experience.

Is it true they won't hire people with Bachelor's degree?

Minimum wage jobs do hire people with Bachelor's degree so why not HHA jobs?

Retention. They spend time & money to train a CHHA only to have them leave a short time later when a better opportunity comes along. They want long term consistent employees.

Is it true they won't hire people with Bachelor's degree?

Minimum wage jobs do hire people with Bachelor's degree so why not HHA jobs?

Why don't you ask the potential employer? Nobody can give you specific answers because you haven't provided specific information. But in general, if you think that being homeless as a choice is going to be a viable option, then you are very misinformed. People that have actually been homeless rarely recommend that route as a lifestyle choice, based on their actual experience.

If you won't have the money to rent a room, then it behooves you to save money before you move. That advice is given to anybody who is contemplating relocating without a job already lined up. Good luck.

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

Same as the above posters...When i graduated with my first bachelors (non-nursing) 7 years ago, it took me two months to find a job. I applied for everything including receptionist, cashier, etc. Each employer told me they cannot hire me because i am over qualified...they know if a better job comes along an overqualified person would take it instead of being stuck in minimum wage long term. Same reason why RNs are not hired as CNAs when they apply for CNA and they already have their RN license....employers know once the RN gets hired as an RN somewhere else, she or he is outta there. EMployers do not want to train and hire someone and then a few months later be searching for someone else, it requires time and $ on their part.

What is your goal being HHA? You want to work while you go to school or pursue an artistic endeavour? I am sure with your Bachelor's degree you can get a more comfortable and higher wage job. Also you said that you cannot lift patients, in HHA interview that would disqualify you. Employers have you take physical exam and you must agree to do all types of patient care with patients....including facilitating mobility...which many patients have little of so you will have to lift patients, which you being a male will likely get adult or elderly males assigned to you.

Before you move here, i, like the above posters, advise you to come with savings (at least $1500)...this is to cover your room and food for at least 2 months in case it takes you that long to get a job.

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 11 years experience.

Even security guards have minimum lift requirements (usually 25-50lbs or more). Generally HHA need to lift 50lbs independently and be able to boost and transfer 100-200lbs.

Overqualified in an employers market is almost never an advantage. I

"Overqualified in an employers market is almost never an advantage. I"

It seems like the rest of your comment was cut off. Could you type it out again?

Retention. They spend time & money to train a CHHA only to have them leave a short time later when a better opportunity comes along. They want long term consistent employees.

I thought HHA had a high turnover rate anyway whether the employee is a high school graduate or college graduate.