Why do newborns have more RBCs, HGB, and HCT?

Posted
by Miley22 Miley22 Member

I am wondering what's the pathophysiology behind this concept...anyone knows why?

:confused:

Mike R, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency. 286 Posts

If they are held below the level of the placenta before the placenta is born, gravity can bring extra blood to the baby causing hyperemia. There may be other causes but I can't think of too many at this moment.

Natkat, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Corrections, neurology, dialysis. Has 14 years experience. 872 Posts

I smell a homework question.

Jolie

Jolie, BSN

Specializes in Maternal - Child Health. Has 36 years experience. 6,375 Posts

I smell a homework question.

The first poster is correct, that positioning of the newly delivered infant and cord at the time of delivery can impact the baby's hemoglobin and hematocrit counts.

But I doubt that is the answer the teacher is looking for. Can the OP explain to us why a fetus would need to have more circulating red blood cells than a healthy, term newborn needs after birth?

BTW, this is not pathophysiology. It is normal human fetal development.

anonymousstudent

anonymousstudent

559 Posts

Can the OP explain to us why a fetus would need to have more circulating red blood cells than a healthy, term newborn needs after birth?

Additionally, can the OP explain how those RBC's in the term NB differ from those of an adult and what that means for the baby?

AOX4RN

AOX4RN, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 7 years experience. 631 Posts

I don't understand how the position of the baby comes into play... are the vessels wide open and allowing blood to drain out of the placenta to flow into the baby?

BluegrassRN

BluegrassRN

Has 14 years experience. 1,188 Posts

I'll give you a hint; look into the normal workings of the newborn liver.