Why is it so hard to find a job?

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BuckyBadgerRN

BuckyBadgerRN, ASN, RN

Specializes in HH, Peds, Rehab, Clinical. Has 4 years experience. 3,520 Posts

Two weeks is NOTHING in the search for a nursing job. You are limited by lack of experience, but I think your bigger hurdle is certainly going to be that you don't drive and are bound by area facilities. Is driving a possibility for you? I'd look into getting that taken care of and I think nursing opportunities will be more available to you

LPNtoRNin2016OH, LPN

Specializes in Allergy/ENT, Occ Health, LTC/Skilled. Has 5 years experience. 1 Article; 541 Posts

I live in Ohio and when I graduated in 2008 it took me forever to get a job but it was in the middle of the worst of the recession. I know where I live at now, LTCs are desperate for LPNs, encouraging new grads to apply. I would look over your resume, the non experience shouldn't be an issue. Does the incident from when your younger show up on background checks? Also employers are more hesitant to hire those without drivers licenses so I would not mention it unless asked. I assume you plan on using public transportation? Or you could just bite the bullet and get your license. I live 10 minutes away from my PRN job and because of how the route is, very hilly and heavy traffic, no way I could walk there without it taking 2 hours.

littlelimabean01, LPN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Trach Care, Diabetes. Has 5 years experience. 69 Posts

My advice if you have not tried, try applying to LTC/skilled nursing (aka nursing homes). You will gain some very valuable experience concerning peg-tubes, trachs, medication knowledge, wound care and even management because you usually will have to manage 3-6 CNA's that work under your license. I work in LTC because that is what I set out to do. I have a passion for the elderly. But I do think that is a great place to start. Most facilities will train a New nurse up to 3 weeks so that you feel comfortable and competent in your care.

Cab411

Cab411

Specializes in home health, hospice, SNF, geriatrics. Has 7 years experience. 25 Posts

I was luck in that the place I was working as a CNA at held a position for me an an LVN when I graduated. I currently am a new ADN graduate, and again, where I currently work as an LVN, they are holding an RN position for me as well. It takes a lot of foot work to get a job, you have to prove that they want you and you will be a positive attribute to their company. Cover letters, resume, and the after letter (after the interview) research the company and their mission statement and see if that statement is something that you can uphold, and if so bring that up in the interview. Also, make sure your references are professional ones and see if you can even get a letter of recommendation from your previous teachers from the program. All of these steps help improve your chances for hire.

Cab411

Cab411

Specializes in home health, hospice, SNF, geriatrics. Has 7 years experience. 25 Posts

My advice if you have not tried, try applying to LTC/skilled nursing (aka nursing homes). You will gain some very valuable experience concerning peg-tubes, trachs, medication knowledge, wound care and even management because you usually will have to manage 3-6 CNA's that work under your license. I work in LTC because that is what I set out to do. I have a passion for the elderly. But I do think that is a great place to start. Most facilities will train a New nurse up to 3 weeks so that you feel comfortable and competent in your care.

I second that statement. I learned so much in LTC skilled nursing. Time management and assessment skills to the max. There were not RN on the floor, just LVN so we interpreted labs called docs did it all. I value my SNF experience :) And I love the elderly too :)

JFLEURIM

JFLEURIM

18 Posts

It shouldn't. All the places i've ever applied for ask me to mention any background not including a minor traffic violation, the accident was very minor and i got a ticket basically for temp permit violation and not watching where i was going. I didn't have car insurance at the time though and that's where all my problems come from. The lady i hit sued me and i didn't go to court so they suspended my license indefinitely. I need to get an sr22 and pay a $150 reinstatement fee to get my permit now. For years though while i was going to school, i wasn't working though and i got my current job to help pay the money i owed to the school to get my diploma and to pay for the nclex so i didn't make it a priority but now that i passed, i'm making it more of a priority then returning to school because if i didn't have really good friends who were willing to help me with my clinicals ( especially the ones that were hours away) i never would've graduated and i don't want to find myself in that situation again.

OrganizedChaos, LVN

Specializes in M/S, LTC, Corrections, PDN & drug rehab. Has 10 years experience. 1 Article; 6,883 Posts

1. Apply outside of the box. If you are only applying to hospitals or one certain area that will make it harder to land a job.

2. Two weeks is nothing! It might honestly take you months & millions of applications until you land a job.

JFLEURIM

JFLEURIM

18 Posts

Are there nurses who work in jobs that aren't as demanding and then work at long term care and forget all the skills?

RNBearColumbus

RNBearColumbus, ADN

Specializes in Hospice. Has 17 years experience. 250 Posts

Are there nurses who work in jobs that aren't as demanding and then work at long term care and forget all the skills?

You will use all of your skills working in long term care / skilled nursing / rehab. You will start IVs, do wound care (including wound vacs) , give meds by every route, etc. You will also develop time management skills.