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Which states require MSN?

Posted

I'm entering nursing from a background in public health with the intent of becoming a CNM. My understanding is that once I get my RN I will just need the clinical portion of midwifery training, since my MPH will count for the Master's degree requirement for CNM certification. But I have also heard that some states will not accept the MPH and require an MSN. How do I know which states require the MSN? Am I going to end up really limited as to where I can practice if I do a CNM training program that does not award an MSN?

Thank you!

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 14 years experience.

My understanding is that once I get my RN I will just need the clinical portion of midwifery training, since my MPH will count for the Master's degree requirement for CNM certification.

You are mistaken. In order to sit for the boards and be a CNM in EVERY state, you will need to complete a MSN in nurse-midwifery.

You may be referring to CM, rather than CNM. There are only a few programs in the US that offer that certification, and I believe that they are all in the Northeast (I believe SUNY does).

Here's the link to SUNY's program - according to ACNM, there are only two programs in the US that they will recognize to take the board exam that are not CNM programs (don't know what the other program is).

Midwifery Program: Admissions Requirements

Edited by klone

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 14 years experience.

As far as employability - I can't say because I don't know ANY CMs personally. I'm guessing because it's so uncommon, a lot of facilities may be hesitant to hire a CM.

queenanneslace, ADN, MSN, APRN, CNM

Specializes in Nurse-Midwife.

Some states specifically require the MSN - most require a Master's degree or higher.

Not revealing which state I live in - mine requires a Master's degree or higher - this could be MS, MSN, MPH, DNP. There are local CNM programs that offer MSN and MS degrees - and these CNMs are eligible for licensing.

I believe Oregon is a state that specifies an MSN for CNM practice. But I'm not certain.

LibraSunCNM, MSN

Specializes in OB. Has 10 years experience.

As the above poster stated, there are differing requirements by state, but as far as I am aware, a master's degree IN MIDWIFERY is required by every state. You can't just use your MPH as your master's degree and then just do clinicals at a midwifery program. For example, my school awarded an MS in Nursing with a concentration in Midwifery. As others stated, Oregon requires an actual MSN. But these degrees all have to be awarded by the midwifery program, unless I have been living on another planet and am totally oblivious to loopholes that the OP may be aware of.

I actually know of about 3 CM in New York State, two of them had been employed by hospitals at some point but all are homebirth midwives at the moment with their own practices. Most midwives I work with (insurance billing) are either CPMs but the vast majority are CNM

For clarification, I'm talking about CNM, not CM.

This is what one of the program's I'm looking at says in their information materials: "Upon completion of the program, graduates are awarded a certificate in nurse-midwifery from [program]. As of 2010, students are required to have a master's degree in a health-related field in order to sit for the national certification exam of the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB)".

I have been told by the director of the program that the certificate + MPH allows me to sit for the exam, and then the CNM license will allow me to practice in most states (not TN or OR-- but she wasn't sure specifically)... I'm just looking for verification of this since I can't find the info online easily myself.

Edited by bex177

MidwifeAPRN219, MSN, RN, APRN, CNM

Specializes in CNM. Has 3 years experience.

It might be Philadelphia University's Post-Master's Certificate. It states "The Post-Master's Certificate in Midwifery is available for individuals who already have a master's degree in a health related discipline from a regionally accredited program and are looking to expand their knowledge with a certification in Midwifery." However, it doesn't state what those health related fields are...Philadelphia University does both CNM and CM. You would have to contact an admission's rep to find out more I'm sure because it doesn't say much on the website.

MidwifeAPRN219, MSN, RN, APRN, CNM

Specializes in CNM. Has 3 years experience.

However, there is still didactic learning you have to do besides clinical training. That goes for any program you do.

For clarification, I'm talking about CNM, not CM.

This is what one of the program's I'm looking at says in their information materials: "Upon completion of the program, graduates are awarded a certificate in nurse-midwifery from [program]. As of 2010, students are required to have a master's degree in a health-related field in order to sit for the national certification exam of the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB)".

I have been told by the director of the program that the certificate + MPH allows me to sit for the exam, and then the CNM license will allow me to practice in most states (not TN or OR-- but she wasn't sure specifically)... I'm just looking for verification of this since I can't find the info online easily myself.

Wrong comment, please ignore

anh06005, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Cardiac, Home Health, Primary Care. Has 6 years experience.

According to the site you provide you'll still have 38 hours of didactic and clinical to do. In the comparison chart it shows you can do those same 38 hours plus 5 additional courses and have your MSN in nurse midwifery...then you wouldn't have to worry so much about what state you go to.

http://sls.downstate.edu/admissions/documents/midwifery_tracks_2012.pdf