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Which practitioner should I go for?

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JDJones89 JDJones89 (New) New

Which Practitioner should I do?

  1. 1. Which Practitioner should I do?

    • Family Nurse Practitioner
    • Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
    • Emergency Practitioner
    • 0
      Other Unlisted Practitioner (Please post what you think!)

4 members have participated

I am going to be finishing up my BSN degree soon and am going to be looking into my MSN degree very shortly but am at a loss for which practitioner I should get. I plan to work with pediatrics, ideally in an ER setting. I know the most logical one to get would be one in pediatrics but I remember someone telling me at some point that would be a bad route to take, especially if I want to work in an ER. I would love some opinions if you would all be so kind! Should I do peds? Should I do FNP? Or, something completely different? Any thoughts and reasons why would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 13 years experience.

I believe that FNP has the greatest flexibility in the ED setting, based on types of NPs in the EDs where I have worked. Best of luck in the remainder of your BSN! I would recommend some solid ED RN experience prior to NP if ED NP is your goal. :)

SmilingBluEyes

Has 26 years experience.

Maybe you should spend time in nursing a bit and then decide your direction. Experience will help on your journey to being an NP.

dream'n, BSN, RN

Specializes in UR/PA, Hematology/Oncology, Med Surg, Psych. Has 28 years experience.

Maybe you should spend time in nursing a bit and then decide your direction. Experience will help on your journey to being an NP.

I agree totally. Work first, you may find that you won't like Pediatrics as much as you think you will. Lots of new nurses find that they dislike areas they thought that they would love and love areas that they thought they would dislike.

Cvepo

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVICU. Has 3 years experience.

Maybe you should spend time in nursing a bit and then decide your direction. Experience will help on your journey to being an NP.

I agree with SmilingBluEyes here. You haven't even gotten a nurse job yet! Sometimes it's easier said than done to just waltz into a Pediatric ED job (in NY unless you get an ED residency, you can't even work in the ED with a year of experience prior, but it may be different where you are).

Everyone seems to go for FNP. Depending on where you live/which schools are around, you should look into an AGACNP (Adult Gerontological Acute Care NP) program, which literally prepares you for acute NP roles.

But for now, get your feet wet. Don't use your first nursing job solely as the minimum for NP school. Find something you like! Being an NP is a big commitment and you will have a lot of responsibility. Spend some time and learn your basics!

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 13 years experience.

If I recall correctly, the OP is already an RN, just completing a BSN.

Cvepo

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVICU. Has 3 years experience.

Ah, you may be right. It isn't very clear based on the post if it's a first time BSN or an ADN-BSN.

I should have specified. I am already a nurse and work in an ICU. Prior to that I was a paramedic for a few years. So, I have the experience and I'm ready to take the next step I am just unsure as to which step I should take.

KatieMI, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine. Has 8 years experience.

Get very friendly with NPs and specialists you're working with, then ask for a "shadow" day or just a few hours. Also, ask if any of them personally know NPs who work in ER, office and hospital; reach for them and ask for the same. This way, you'll get a feeling of who is actually doing what and make informed choice.

To work with kids in ER, one can be Pediatrics (probably better Acute) NP or FNP. Peds programs are few and far between; if you want this, get some sort of experience with kids and be 110% sure that the program provides preceptors because Peds preceptors are notoriously difficult to find. FNP programs are easier to get into because there are so many of them and pretty much everyone can be accepted somewhere. You will be able to start working in ER right out o f school with FNP, but expereince/connections in ER will help a lot. FNP is also way more flexible in case you would like to switch areas in the future.

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 13 years experience.

I should have specified. I am already a nurse and work in an ICU. Prior to that I was a paramedic for a few years. So, I have the experience and I'm ready to take the next step I am just unsure as to which step I should take.

Do you get peds experience in your ICU at all? Is there an opportunity for PRN work in an all-ages ED so that you can get some ED exposure and peds exposure at the same time? Yes, I know you were a paramedic first (I started there too), but the ED as an RN is a different animal than paramedic or ICU. Just a thought. :)

SmilingBluEyes

Has 26 years experience.

My apologies to the OP.

I mistook you for a new RN. Others said it better; spend time with various NPs and shadow them. Then you might be clearer on what works for you. Gerontology is a good one; lots of people getting older by the day. I see a need for gerontology NPs in our near future.

I wish you the very best on your journey to advanced practice.

I usually do not have any experience with Peds on my floor. Occasionally we might get a 15 to 18-year-old depending on the level of trauma but that is about it. I actually do also work in an ER PRN at a different hospital so I have that going for me as well.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

Moved to student NP forum

Dodongo, APRN, NP

Has 7 years experience.

So why don't you go for the Primary Peds/Acute care Peds role? The school I attend offers a combined program. You can work at a children's hospital in the ED. Consider the area in which you live. In my neck of the woods, the only ER you will likely see many children in is downtown at the Children's hospital. Otherwise you're going to be mostly seeing geriatrics. If you want to work in peds do a PNP of some kind.

I really do not understand why so many people think they have to do FNP to "have more options" or because it's "more flexible". If you want to work with a certain population, you can.

Alternatively, if you are unsure of what type of NP you want to be, you should work as a nurse first. It's a great foundation for NP school (as this is the model NP was designed around) and you can discover what you actually enjoy.

Zyprexa

Has 2 years experience.

If you want to work with kids in an ER setting, wouldn't that be Pediatric NP - Acute Care? I don't know the acronym.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

It is really disheartening to see some nurses jump all over another nurse without even understanding the question.

I am going to be finishing up my BSN degree soon and am going to be looking into my MSN degree very shortly but am at a loss for which practitioner I should get. I plan to work with pediatrics, ideally in an ER setting. I know the most logical one to get would be one in pediatrics but I remember someone telling me at some point that would be a bad route to take, especially if I want to work in an ER. I would love some opinions if you would all be so kind! Should I do peds? Should I do FNP? Or, something completely different? Any thoughts and reasons why would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

Really only you know the answer to this question, and if you aren't sure about the answer (or at least mostly sure) than keep researching and shadowing until you are. This is a big investment in the remainder of your career so make sure you know what you want before you lay out the time and the money for an NP program.

If you aren't sure then what's the rush to start a program? If we understand that it would help us give you some direction perhaps.

Well not so much a rush as much as I'm ready to just finish up all my schooling. I know how hard it is to get back to it once you stop and I'm afraid if I do it'll be awhile. I have two kids and a pretty busy life and it'd be nice just to knock it all out now while my kids are young and be done with that portion of my life, you know?

And, I'm pretty positive as far as the area I want to work in it's just that I've always heard mixed reviews as to which letters to put behind my name. I've heard PNP limits me, especially in an ER setting and was even told at one point I wouldn't be able to see anyone over the age of 16. Whereas as FNP I feel like is so generalized I may be passed over for a pediatric position because maybe they want someone who specializes in Peds....i feel like it's a catch 22.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

Well not so much a rush as much as I'm ready to just finish up all my schooling. I know how hard it is to get back to it once you stop and I'm afraid if I do it'll be awhile. I have two kids and a pretty busy life and it'd be nice just to knock it all out now while my kids are young and be done with that portion of my life, you know?

And, I'm pretty positive as far as the area I want to work in it's just that I've always heard mixed reviews as to which letters to put behind my name. I've heard PNP limits me, especially in an ER setting and was even told at one point I wouldn't be able to see anyone over the age of 16. Whereas as FNP I feel like is so generalized I may be passed over for a pediatric position because maybe they want someone who specializes in Peds....i feel like it's a catch 22.

That's understandable and it sounds like it is a good time for you to go for it.

In many ways you can't go horribly wrong with either option (PNP vs FNP) as things stand now. Have you spent time in a pediatric ED? Are you absolutely sure that's where you see yourself for the next 10-15 years or more? Its a very specialized goal and you should be aware that it may be very difficult to get a job in a niche market. If you don't have a local children's hospital then FNP would probably make you a better candidate for an ED job at a community hospital.

Another thing to consider is what program close to you has the best reputation? Do they offer both a PNP and FNP or just one or the other?