Jump to content

What are they REALLY testing us on?!?!?!

Posted

My classmates and I are struggling in our med-surg class! Yesterday we had our third test, 50 questions, only half of which were disscussed in lecture/read in books/nclex review. The other 25 questions were "random" questions from material that we had never touched before!!! We are given "reading assignments" and "objectives" for each topic we are responsible for, but 9 times out of 10 they don't reflect the material discussed in class or in the book.

The only thing I can figure is that the objectives were written many years ago (when the professor started teaching it) and although she has changed the page #'s for the reading assignments for new editions I think she has failed to look at the content of each chapter to see how the layout is and which concepts are disscussed where. What do we do!?!?!:uhoh3:

i am having the same problems with my class. the teachers spends lots of time teaching us specific things, then when it comes to testing, the things they taught us weren't on the test. instead, random information in the chapters we were assigned to read was pulled out. my frustration is that there is just too much information to absorb. our tests usually consist of 5 chapters and we get a total of 3 exams and 1 final exam as the grade for nursing. each test is 50 questions.

my gripe is why can't the teachers tell us what to focus on when we are studying since it's so much information. i have bought this up with other students, many agree with me, but those that are passing the class say doing that would make the class too easy, which i totally disagree with. last exam we had, 80% of my class failed it. this indicates to me that something is wrong and couldn't possibly be just the students.

recently, our 3rd exam, there were rumors that some students, who had certain clinical teachers that also taught our class gave them clues on what specific things to study, for the exam. this was a true rumor and it's unfair to the rest of the students but also shows that even some of the teachers acknowledge it's too much information and we need some guidance to what we should study for our exams.

so my curiosity is if others are experiencing similar things and if so, how are they handling their classes?

we are having the same problem in our class this semester and i fear that it is only going to get worse in second semester. have you found any answers to your questions and concerns that you could pass my way?

i am having the same problems with my class. the teachers spends lots of time teaching us specific things, then when it comes to testing, the things they taught us weren't on the test. instead, random information in the chapters we were assigned to read was pulled out. my frustration is that there is just too much information to absorb. our tests usually consist of 5 chapters and we get a total of 3 exams and 1 final exam as the grade for nursing. each test is 50 questions.

my gripe is why can't the teachers tell us what to focus on when we are studying since it's so much information. i have bought this up with other students, many agree with me, but those that are passing the class say doing that would make the class too easy, which i totally disagree with. last exam we had, 80% of my class failed it. this indicates to me that something is wrong and couldn't possibly be just the students.

recently, our 3rd exam, there were rumors that some students, who had certain clinical teachers that also taught our class gave them clues on what specific things to study, for the exam. this was a true rumor and it's unfair to the rest of the students but also shows that even some of the teachers acknowledge it's too much information and we need some guidance to what we should study for our exams.

so my curiosity is if others are experiencing similar things and if so, how are they handling their classes?

We are having the same problem in our class this semester and I fear that it is only going to get worse in second semester. Have you found any answers to your questions and concerns that you could pass my way?
:uhoh3:

I think we are going to go to the dean and have it out...

I still wonder how much it will help since our professor is high up in the ranks, but I guess we will never know until we try!

Any other advice?!?!

My current debate on the next course of action was to write a letter to the head of the department. Or you can write a statement of concerns and have classmates who agree with you sign it. Usually, writing something seems to be more effective than directly approaching the person.

from my experience in other "non nursing" college courses that I believe it cannot be an accident. Is there some national "nursing instructor training body" that teaches this sort of testing approach?

My current debate on the next course of action was to write a letter to the head of the department. Or you can write a statement of concerns and have classmates who agree with you sign it. Usually, writing something seems to be more effective than directly approaching the person.

RainDreamer, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 13 years experience.

I'm in my 3rd semester of the nursing classes. There's nothing I can tell you that will just make the tests easier. I had a really hard time with it first semester. I remember thinking "where are they getting these questions?!?!" The tests 1st semester are so hard because they are NOTHING like any tests we've ever taken in any other classes. You can't just study the material and memorize it. You have to KNOW the material. Understand it, comprehend it, know how to apply it! Know it backwards and forwards. After you understand it and know it, you must then know how to APPLY it. That's the hardest thing to learn..... how to study the material in a way that you can apply it to the test questions. The test questions aren't knowledge-based, they're application-based.

How much do you study for the tests? You can't just study the night before the test. You can't just study 2 days before the test, not even 3 or 4 or 5 days before the test, not even a week before the test! Your studying must be an ongoing process. Study as you go. Read the chapter before lecture. Go to lecture, listen, and take notes. Ask any questions if something isn't making sense to you. Then after lecture read the chapter again, do the study guide with the book, do the CD that comes with the book (if there is one), answer the questions at the back of the chapter. Then read the chapter AGAIN, read your notes again. Do this for each chapter. Yes it's a lot of work and VERY time consuming.... but that's nursing school.

Even if it were an open book test, you still wouldn't be able to pick out the exact answer in the chapter. That's how the nursing exams are. They're subjective. A lot of times in nursing there's not just 1 right way to do something. You have to take the knowledge you know and apply it to the situation you're in .... and do the thing that BEST fits the situation based on what you know. That's what they're testing you on..... can you take what you learned and apply it in a real-life situation?

RainDreamer, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 13 years experience.

And like I said, I had a really hard time with the tests first semester.... just because it was so different than what I was used to. But it does get easier. The material and the test don't get easier, but you get used to them. It's a whole new way of thinking .... you'll get there!

My online pharm instuctor is like that. She just keeps using the same tests from the old textbook for this class.

wonderbee, BSN, RN

Specializes in critical care; community health; psych.

You might get several concepts in a single situational question that were discussed in lecture which you are supposed to critically think out to come to a conclusion which may not have been discussed in lecture. This is the essence of NCLEX.

Our tests are like that. Many don't feel that the information is being discussed but really, it is. It's just presented differently. The raw information is there. The conclusion is ours to come to.

Can't say this is what is happening with you but I see it in my school. Like another poster said, it's a different way of thinking.

Good luck!

Kat

crb613, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med Surg/Tele/ER. Has 7 years experience.

I am hearing the same thing at my school. I am not in med-surg yet but about 1/2 of the third semester students are failing. Our instructors told us that in med-surg you have to be able to apply what you know not just spit answers back out. All I know is after reading these posts & hearing about it at school I sure do dread it. Good Luck

acgemt

Specializes in Emergency Nursing. Has 1 years experience.

Good morning,

The way my school does it is that each textbook we use has a "bank" of test questions. These are the questions that the instructors choose from. So they may not be entirely related to the objectives in our study guides, but they are related to the material in the book. Don't get discouraged.

How much do you study for the tests? You can't just study the night before the test. You can't just study 2 days before the test, not even 3 or 4 or 5 days before the test, not even a week before the test! Your studying must be an ongoing process. Study as you go. Read the chapter before lecture. Go to lecture, listen, and take notes. Ask any questions if something isn't making sense to you. Then after lecture read the chapter again, do the study guide with the book, do the CD that comes with the book (if there is one), answer the questions at the back of the chapter. Then read the chapter AGAIN, read your notes again. Do this for each chapter. Yes it's a lot of work and VERY time consuming.... but that's nursing school.

There is definately something wrong with the diploma program I'm in. I'd love to have enough time to do what you described above!!! The program I'm in moves so fast that there's hardly time to just read the material. And I study constantly 10 to 14 hours per day. Yikes there's definately something wrong with my instructors/school!!

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.