What are the pros of getting your BSN?

Students General Students

Published

You are reading page 4 of What are the pros of getting your BSN?

pricklypear

1,060 Posts

Specializes in Telemetry, ICU, Resource Pool, Dialysis.
From Home Health

I got my ADN in 1979 and worked for many years before considering my BSN. What I experienced in the workplace was that BSN graduates with no experience felt they were better than ADN graduates. They didn't seem to have as good clinical skills as ADN graduates. They knew a lot of theory but that doesn't help as much as more bedside nursing. Whether or not you decide to get A BSN is up to you. It doesn't get you more pay but can help if you want to be in management. I feel I am a better nurse for having experience before I got my BSN. It opened up a whole new world for me. I am going to start my MSN soon because I want to be a teacher of nursing. Only you can decide what is right fior you.

To the OP - you WILL have excellent clinical skills if you attend a BSN program. The myth that a BSN knows lots of theory, and has few technical skills is just that, a myth. Do not let this be a factor in your decision. Base your choice on time, what you can afford, and where you see yourself in 20 years. Personally, I chose BSN because I knew I wouldn't want to go back to school once I started working, and on the off chance that it ever becomes required as entry level. I just wanted to get it all over and done with. I've never regretted it.

gwt

40 Posts

There will come a time when your sick of working on your feet 12 hours/day and a dream job, 9-5, as a school nurse or perhaps a Dr.'s office will present itself and you can jump right into it. Huge opportunities out there that are worth the extra education. If you are young, doing 15-17 credit hours a semester will be a breeze and the time will fly!!! Good Luck.

nursemaa

259 Posts

To the OP - you WILL have excellent clinical skills if you attend a BSN program. The myth that a BSN knows lots of theory, and has few technical skills is just that, a myth. .

...and anyway, things like IV starts and catheter insertions are psychomotor skills that can and will be learned and refined as you begin your practice. I'd rather see students come out knowing how to prioritize, critically think, organize their time, and with a strong knowledge of disease processes and how to manage the patient's care, as well as with significant leadership skills. Those skills will help them survive in the crazy world of hospital nursing. While it's important to have basic skills, it's not necessary to have performed every clinical skill while in school, those opportunities will come along. I think too often we judge how "good" a nurse is based on motor skill performance rather than on her ability to coordinate and manage the care of patients. That may be why we are often viewed by others as technicians rather than professionals. Just my opinion. :)

smc9

11 Posts

Hello,

I read your response and it brought a question to mind. I start nursing school in August 2005 (Associate Degree program) and will be finished in May of 2007. If I decided to go for my BSN, but waited a couple of years, are you saying that I would have to retake, anatomy, physio, micro etc. since I started taking my sciences classes in 2003 and 2009 would obviously be 6 years later?

Thanks!

RN_Jen

131 Posts

Specializes in OR, Hospice.
Hello,

I read your response and it brought a question to mind. I start nursing school in August 2005 (Associate Degree program) and will be finished in May of 2007. If I decided to go for my BSN, but waited a couple of years, are you saying that I would have to retake, anatomy, physio, micro etc. since I started taking my sciences classes in 2003 and 2009 would obviously be 6 years later?

Thanks!

:no: .......if you are already an RN when you go for your BSN most schools have an accelerated program that only takes 12-18 months, in most cases. That's how it is in my neck of the woods anyway.

Tweety, BSN, RN

33,830 Posts

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.
Hello,

I read your response and it brought a question to mind. I start nursing school in August 2005 (Associate Degree program) and will be finished in May of 2007. If I decided to go for my BSN, but waited a couple of years, are you saying that I would have to retake, anatomy, physio, micro etc. since I started taking my sciences classes in 2003 and 2009 would obviously be 6 years later?

Thanks!

Heaven's no. Certain programs might have differing requirements. The RN to BSN program I'm in requires a separate course in a college level in chemistry and I had to take that because my ADN program accepted high school chemistry. But you certainly don't have to repeat any courses. Though some things might be a review, for instance I'm taking a course in Pharmacology, some of which will be a review, much of which won't. Also pathophysiology, it's going to be more indepth, but some of it's going to be a review. Other nursing courses weren't covered in my ADN program, like a whole course on nursing research, public health, etc. I'm learning quite a bit that wasn't covered in my ADN program in this much detail.

It's going to take me 24 months part time. :)

Shastalee99

50 Posts

Hello. I haven't begun my nursing studies yet, but I was wondering if going for BSN after receiving an AA degree in nursing is a good idea. What are the differences between a nurse with a BSN and one with an ADN from a community college? Are they both considered a RN? Is there a salary difference? Does having a BSN make a nurse look more favorable to recruiters? Also, are there materials/experiences that a nurse will never learn if he or she never enters a BSN program that will affect work performance in the real world? Is an ADN not enough???? And would that be a reason why nurses continue their education? Who knows if I may feel that I need more school education later on, but for now I'm planning on enrolling in an ADN program at a near community college and find work right after because I do not want to spend three additional years after graduating from a two year nursing program studing and doing rotations. Is this a bad choice? Will people look down on me or think that I'm not capable of carrying out certain tasks because I do not have a BSN? Are nurses with BSN and ADN basically the same is what I would like to end this post with :) Please help. Thanks.

OH and this is an edit. I'm not a shy person and I love to talk, but I have a fear of public speaking. I totally blank out for no reason at all :p I love to perform in front of an audience, but no public speaking. Would I have to do some oral presentations while in nursing school (ADN and BSN)? If that is the case, I guess I have to deal with it :crying2:

I've read many posts and agree with pursuing your Associates degree first. With a 2 yr degree, you'll jump right into clinical and gain that experience right away. You'll take your general ed. reqs with your nursing classes (in most schools). This might be hard depending on your situation. I'm married and have a step-child on the weekends and summertime. I also work as a PCA part time. (presently looking for another job for additional income...)

I was originally a teacher major for el. ed. I got my pre-reqs in like 2 English, 2 History, Psychology classes, etc. So I wasn't too overwelmed in nursing school. Of course the first 2 semesters in our ADN program are a breeze compared to the last 2! Lol.

Especially in the hospital where I work, the PCA's who attend 4-yr. schools for nursing have no idea about nursing. They're in their first 2 years and are fullfilling their general ed. classes or Bursing Assessment classes. But they have no experience and no idea why we learn what we learn, why hand washing is so important and why we assess for certain things. These girls don't know how to organize themselves for multi-tasking or don't know what a nurse's job entails.

In all, I think ASN are more experienced (depending on the school) than BSN nursing school students because they are learning the hardest stuff first and all at once. Many schools will give you a scholarship to their 4-year school for having your RN already. I'll attend University at Buffalo with a 5,000 scholarship just to start. If I keep my GPA above 3.0, that is more possible money. BSN will get you a tad bit more $, but it's a big deal if you want to go on with your nursing education and field.

It's so early in your nursing career, that your mind may change in a couple years. Getting your AS first is the best choice for many people instead of planning 4 or 5 years ahead.

Good luck to you!!

smc9

11 Posts

Heaven's no. Certain programs might have differing requirements. The RN to BSN program I'm in requires a separate course in a college level in chemistry and I had to take that because my ADN program accepted high school chemistry. But you certainly don't have to repeat any courses. Though some things might be a review, for instance I'm taking a course in Pharmacology, some of which will be a review, much of which won't. Also pathophysiology, it's going to be more indepth, but some of it's going to be a review. Other nursing courses weren't covered in my ADN program, like a whole course on nursing research, public health, etc. I'm learning quite a bit that wasn't covered in my ADN program in this much detail.

It's going to take me 24 months part time. :)

THANK YOU!!!!! I appreciate the quick response.

smc9

11 Posts

:no: .......if you are already an RN when you go for your BSN most schools have an accelerated program that only takes 12-18 months, in most cases. That's how it is in my neck of the woods anyway.

Thanks for the info!

SarasotaRN2b

1,164 Posts

My situation was that I applied for both the ADN program and the BSN program since I had finished the additional prereqs required for that. I found out the end of January that I was accepted into the BSN and would have to wait at least until the beginning of May regarding the ADN. Considering I have already been working on my prereqs for 3 years (after changing majors once), it made sense to go for my bachelors instead. At least after 5 years, I can say I got both an Associates degree and a bachelors degree, not just two associates degrees. Also since I would like to teach at one time, going for my bachelors now is preferable to waiting.

I do think that those students that are taking the ADN program and get through it are the real survivors. To me, the ADN program is way more intensive.

Kris

smc9

11 Posts

My situation was that I applied for both the ADN program and the BSN program since I had finished the additional prereqs required for that. I found out the end of January that I was accepted into the BSN and would have to wait at least until the beginning of May regarding the ADN. Considering I have already been working on my prereqs for 3 years (after changing majors once), it made sense to go for my bachelors instead. At least after 5 years, I can say I got both an Associates degree and a bachelors degree, not just two associates degrees. Also since I would like to teach at one time, going for my bachelors now is preferable to waiting.

I do think that those students that are taking the ADN program and get through it are the real survivors. To me, the ADN program is way more intensive.

Kris

Thanks Kris!

rosendalemj

46 Posts

I started in a diploma program. It was just OK regarding the actual learning experience.

Decided it was not enough and applied to a BSN program and started completey over (after a year at diploma).

There's no comparison. The BSN program is incredible. The academics are outstanding. The instructors are all PHD researchers, or MS critical care specialists, or MS critical care flight specialists, or heavily experienced MS nurses working on Phd's, absolutly cutting edge instruction. And the instructors are carefully selected as to ability to teach as well.

Studying at the diploma school was exceptional preparation for university study. IT WAS NOT A SUBSTITUTE. Glad I did a year there. I'm going to be incredibly well rounded in the basics. However, I'm astounded at how much the diploma program left out! But then one does not need to know all that to be a floor nurse AND PASS THE NCLEX. It's preparing a foundation for advanced study and advanced practice.

good luck

Mike

+ Add a Comment

By using the site, you agree with our Policies. X