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What happens if I don't work right away??? (May 2020 Grad)

Job Hunt   (455 Views | 4 Replies)

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I am a nursing student about to graduate in May 2020. My husband and I have been married nearly 2.5 years and are thinking about having kids soon. I've always wanted to stay home at least some while the kids are young, but I know that most nursing residency programs right now are about a year-long commitment. I would have no problems waiting to start working at all until the kids are older, but a lot of residency programs require the grad to have passed the NCLEX in the past 6 months. Would it be possible for me to start working/orienting as a "new grad" (i.e. no experience) if I've had my RN for 5-7 years already? I would love to hear from any nurse managers/recruiters on how this affects job prospects.

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

4 Followers; 1,739 Posts; 3,658 Profile Views

3 hours ago, Connor H. said:

Would it be possible for me to start working/orienting as a "new grad" (i.e. no experience) if I've had my RN for 5-7 years already? I would love to hear from any nurse managers/recruiters on how this affects job prospects.

No, because your knowledge is nowhere near current. In fact, there are more than a few threads on here with the same, or similar circumstances. They are not getting interviews, or are having to take less than their desired job circumstances. Keep this in mind as you proceed and make your decisions. Good luck with your career decision 

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Rose_Queen is a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

7 Followers; 4 Articles; 9,118 Posts; 106,340 Profile Views

3 hours ago, Connor H. said:

Would it be possible for me to start working/orienting as a "new grad" (i.e. no experience) if I've had my RN for 5-7 years already?

Extremely unlikely, especially if you are in a saturated area. Those you graduated with will have years of experience. Those who graduate when you start your job hunt will have more current knowledge. You are putting yourself into the situation of the "old new grad" who has been out of school without experience. It will be a major hurdle to overcome.

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meaa42 has 1 years experience as a RN.

20 Posts; 359 Profile Views

That's a bad idea. It's very hard to get a decent job the longer you've been away from nursing. I would get a job ASAP, wait a few months to get pregnant so that you can finish you're year. You can work while pregnant. That would make it easier to get back into nursing. 

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5 hours ago, meaa42 said:

That's a bad idea. It's very hard to get a decent job the longer you've been away from nursing. I would get a job ASAP, wait a few months to get pregnant so that you can finish you're year. You can work while pregnant. That would make it easier to get back into nursing. 

Yes, to all replies.  Get some good nursing experience, wait a few months to try to get pregnant, work while pregnant.  Find out about your facilities Family Medical Leave Act before you get pregnant.  

My daughter and her husband piggybacked their FMLA leave so mom stayed home for 10  weeks, then back to work and hubby used FMLA.  Great way for dad to get a chance to really do the hands on.  

After all that you can get part time, per/diem work while your kids are young if you have good experience under your belt. 

The great part about working in a 24/7 business is you can work one or two shifts a week or every other weekend, keeps your foot in the door. (That really teaches hubby and kids to learn to take care of things when mom's not around.)

A co-worker worked three twelve hour shifts, Fri., Sat., Sun.,  7 pm to 7 am, so he could be home all week with his children.

 

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