Mission Trips

  1. Hey everyone!! I was posting to hopefully seek some information about mission trips! I want to go on a trip with a few of my nursing friends abroad to volunteer. Does anyone know of any organizations? Or has anyone gone on one? I would love to hear what organization you went through and about your experience! I've looked into one called Faith in Practice that goes to Guatemala that looks interesting! Thanks so much, I really appreciate it
  2. Visit conway13 profile page

    About conway13

    Joined: Apr '13; Posts: 10; Likes: 3

    9 Comments

  3. by   kakamegamama
    You might check GoBGR's website and see if they have any that you would be interested in. I've not traveled with them except for post Nepal earthquake work, but they are a good organization. While I applaud your desire to go, I encourage you to really determine within yourself the WHY you are going. "Missional vacation"? Not a good idea. Desire to truly serve those in need--a better idea. However, sometimes in our helping, we actually hurt. If there are people who live and work wherever you go who have invested in people there for purpose beyond medical teams, that's something to take into account as well. Also, learn about the culture of where you go--it will help you and them. Sometimes, in our desire to help, we do more damage than good. Anyway---I know I've given you more information than an answer to your question, but it's important. Please feel free to PM me if you want to know more.
  4. by   conway13
    Thanks for your advice, I am not interested in going for a "missional vacation".
  5. by   kakamegamama
    Quote from conway13
    Thanks for your advice, I am not interested in going for a "missional vacation".
    I'm glad to hear that!
  6. by   NRSKarenRN
    Several of my home health colleagues have participated in mission trips with Global Health Ministry. Mom Baby Manager and RN Educator just came back from trip to Jamaica triaging 100 persons a day for medical care --both spoke glowing of how trip invigorated their nursing practice.

    I was able to donate my brothers unused trach + medical supplies to them post his death instead of discarding them --later heard they made their way to Peru for a vent dependent patient.

    Several AN members have recommended organizations they've volunteered with --do a search right top corner for "mission trips" to locate prior threads.
  7. by   bugya90
    Idk how long of a trip you are wanting to do. Mercy Ships are always looking for medical and nursing volunteers but I believe their trips are 3 months long due to logistics (the ships only come to port at certain times).
  8. by   ElvishDNP
    I have been on several mission trips (mostly secular) and agree with the notion that it is extremely important to examine your motives. I understand that you're not interested in a 'missional vacation,' and that's a good start. Wanting to give back is a far better reason to want to go on mission trips. The first trip I went on was one to Haiti when I was 18, and while I went wanting to help I'm not sure I did any good at all. I learned a lot and my perspective on a lot of things changed drastically, but in retrospect I was more of a burden to the people around me than a help. I didn't do anything stupid like get drunk and act like a fool, or crash any motor vehicles, but I didn't contribute anything useful to the people around me, either. So I've tried to do better and be better since then.

    Partnering with 'boots on the ground' so to speak is a far better idea than a group that goes down from outside once or twice a year and expects the host country to do things the way the outsiders want. People who live and work in an area are going to have a far better idea of people's actual needs and what interventions will actually work.

    I would also highly recommend reading the book 'Toxic Charity' by Robert Lupton before embarking on any sort of mission trip. I didn't read before I went, but wish I had.

    Finally, wherever you do end up going, it's important to know where you're going. It's good to know culture, yes, but history is also important. Is the place a former colony whose people and/or resources were exploited by the colonizers? There might be some (understandable) resentment/resistance toward foreigners coming in ostensibly to help. Recent wars or conflicts? Were there outside governments meddling? (ex. USA/USSR in Afghanistan and Nicaragua) Realize that you might not be welcomed with open arms. (*alternately, you might be humbled by people's kindness to you despite the sins of your government. That works both ways.*)

    I don't mean to sound like I'm discouraging you from going. I'm not. There are wonderful people doing wonderful work all around the world, and expanding our own horizons almost always makes us better people. I just think it's v important to go for the right reasons, to respect the dignity of the people you're going to be serving, and be a responsible steward of the privilege you're given as a guest in someone else's country.
  9. by   kakamegamama
    Mercy Ships is a great organization. I have a friend who has gone on 2 week ventures with them once they are in port, so a shorter than 3 months should be possible.
  10. by   kakamegamama
    Quote from ElvishDNP
    I have been on several mission trips (mostly secular) and agree with the notion that it is extremely important to examine your motives. I understand that you're not interested in a 'missional vacation,' and that's a good start. Wanting to give back is a far better reason to want to go on mission trips. The first trip I went on was one to Haiti when I was 18, and while I went wanting to help I'm not sure I did any good at all. I learned a lot and my perspective on a lot of things changed drastically, but in retrospect I was more of a burden to the people around me than a help. I didn't do anything stupid like get drunk and act like a fool, or crash any motor vehicles, but I didn't contribute anything useful to the people around me, either. So I've tried to do better and be better since then.

    Partnering with 'boots on the ground' so to speak is a far better idea than a group that goes down from outside once or twice a year and expects the host country to do things the way the outsiders want. People who live and work in an area are going to have a far better idea of people's actual needs and what interventions will actually work.

    I would also highly recommend reading the book 'Toxic Charity' by Robert Lupton before embarking on any sort of mission trip. I didn't read before I went, but wish I had.

    Finally, wherever you do end up going, it's important to know where you're going. It's good to know culture, yes, but history is also important. Is the place a former colony whose people and/or resources were exploited by the colonizers? There might be some (understandable) resentment/resistance toward foreigners coming in ostensibly to help. Recent wars or conflicts? Were there outside governments meddling? (ex. USA/USSR in Afghanistan and Nicaragua) Realize that you might not be welcomed with open arms. (*alternately, you might be humbled by people's kindness to you despite the sins of your government. That works both ways.*)

    I don't mean to sound like I'm discouraging you from going. I'm not. There are wonderful people doing wonderful work all around the world, and expanding our own horizons almost always makes us better people. I just think it's v important to go for the right reasons, to respect the dignity of the people you're going to be serving, and be a responsible steward of the privilege you're given as a guest in someone else's country.
    Yes! You said what I wanted to, but wrangling 2 very active little grandboys made a short post necessary! I've seen first hand the negative impact we can have on other people groups, even while trying to help. I wish I had known "then" what I know now!
  11. by   ItsThatJenGirl
    One of the doctors I volunteer with recommended Global Health Reach. There's a trip every three months for a few days to Guatemala. I really like their mission statements and goals.

    Global Health Reach Know how Global Health Reach Works!

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