Jump to content

Volunteer Nurses: Counted as a Work Experience?

Philippines   (41,358 Views 81 Comments)
by rlssem rlssem (Member)

2,512 Visitors; 106 Posts

advertisement

You are reading page 3 of Volunteer Nurses: Counted as a Work Experience?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

diapersprinkles has 4 years experience as a MSN and specializes in ICU.

2,868 Visitors; 87 Posts

Good luck finding a job in the OR. It is a position in demand in the USA. Sounds like you have the right attitude and that you had good clinical instructors who held you to high standards.

Let us know how your interview went.

hi alexk49! i passed the interview!!!^_^ i'm also done with my physical exam, etc. i'm just waiting for their call on when i'll be deployed. i still don't know where i'll be placed. we were told we'd find out after the orientation.

i haven't informed yet the hospital where i'm volunteering because i don't have an exact date yet on when i'd start working... i don't even know if i'd be deployed this feb or march that's why i don't want to "resign" yet. but i think i have to inform them at least one week in advance so they could find a replacement for me. i don't want my colleagues to suffer and do straight shifts because i left in such short notice.

btw, apparently, we were given an "allowance" for our volunteer work after our first 2 weeks! it was so unexpected. in some way, i also find it sad to leave my colleagues because they are really nice and we are such a great team! i'm also anxious/excited to work in this next hospital because it is so big compared to the hospital where i volunteer... it's also a new environment, new bosses, new kinds of patients, new colleagues, new everything! i'm nervous!^_^'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ginger's Mom has 41 years experience as a MSN, RN.

1 Article; 22,298 Visitors; 3,178 Posts

Wonderful news and thanks for sharing. Glad to hear you are getting some recognition for your time as a volunteer. You will do great, you have a great attitude and will succeed in whatever you do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9,778 Visitors; 644 Posts

Volunteer work in the Philippines does not count as work experience in other countries as one is not fully responsible for the patient. You are not responsible 100% for the care of the patient and in the majority of the facilities you also do not administer medications as well.

The sad thing is, Suzanne, that here in the Philippines a volunteer nurse (in most cases) has the same responsibilities as a paid nurse.

Until the government here really eliminates corruption and passes some laws which help healthcare rise to the level of other semi-industrialized nations it'll always be a problem with exploitation of labor.

Regardless of this toxic environment, Pinoy nurses continue to provide massive levels of compassionate care and treat each patient to the best of his or her own abilities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

861 Visitors; 3 Posts

I just passed the NLE. So as I am reading through this thread what I am getting is -- Volunteering is NOT an experience but is an "unwritten" prerequisite to have an experience. Is there any other way to not get into this sick process?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9,778 Visitors; 644 Posts

I just passed the NLE. So as I am reading through this thread what I am getting is -- Volunteering is NOT an experience but is an "unwritten" prerequisite to have an experience. Is there any other way to not get into this sick process?

1) Practice your interview skills. I've interviewed dozens of people for various job positions here in the Philippines and I can tell you that there is obviously no instruction going on at public school or college level to teach people the right ways to interview. Interviewees are nervous, they stammer, use verbal crutches (um, uh, ano, etc..) and are completely incapable (it seems) of forming a coherent answer to simple questions such as "Can you give me an example of how you solved a problem with your past job?" or even "What would you like to be doing in five years?"

I only do level 1 interviews for a few jobs here in Manila, not the level 2 or final interviews. I am not in charge of hiring anyone so please, no PMs.

2) Work in Saudi or Dubai first but make sure you have a legitimate contract for a nurse position, make sure everything is spelled out clearly. If your family can support you in the financial obligations then go for Australia or New Zealand since they are actually better for Filipinos than the USA in many ways.

3) Be firm with hospitals that you are a high quality nurse and they should respect you as such and honor a paid position. Don't compromise on yourself or your standards.

4) Band together with fellow nurses. If all nurses in the Philippines stop volunteering for hospitals then hospitals will stop the practice of exploiting labor, they only do it because nurses support it. Hospitals can afford to hire, they just don't because there are so many nurses that they can exploit you all. Hopefully this issue will be brought up in the upcoming conference. I've asked someone to address it, we'll see how she does

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

echo23 has 3 years experience as a RN and specializes in ER.

2,150 Visitors; 35 Posts

I know an agency that are accepting volunteer nurse as an experience for New Zealand. A year of volunteering is enough and of course an ielts passer with a grade of 7 in all subtests. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

diapersprinkles has 4 years experience as a MSN and specializes in ICU.

2,868 Visitors; 87 Posts

1) Practice your interview skills. I've interviewed dozens of people for various job positions here in the Philippines and I can tell you that there is obviously no instruction going on at public school or college level to teach people the right ways to interview. Interviewees are nervous, they stammer, use verbal crutches (um, uh, ano, etc..) and are completely incapable (it seems) of forming a coherent answer to simple questions such as "Can you give me an example of how you solved a problem with your past job?" or even "What would you like to be doing in five years?"

this is so true... i have noticed that the people who stammer and can't express themselves well during interviews don't get to be called back for the next step.

i went to several interviews even if i don't have any plan of working at some of them (i.e. call centers, sales, etc.) because that way, i get to practice my interview and critical thinking skills, especially for those clinical/panel interviews. i am not boasting, but i think the experience (and the feedbacks) i got from the interviews i've been has helped me a lot to improve in interviews and in getting my present job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

diapersprinkles has 4 years experience as a MSN and specializes in ICU.

2,868 Visitors; 87 Posts

I just passed the NLE. So as I am reading through this thread what I am getting is -- Volunteering is NOT an experience but is an "unwritten" prerequisite to have an experience. Is there any other way to not get into this sick process?

doing something related to nursing is better than not doing anything at all.

i know a lot of people will disagree with me on this. i myself was also against volunteering. as much as possible, i want to work as a hired staff nurse... but it took a long time for hospitals to give feedback regarding my application... so i volunteered and i was able to use my background as a volunteer in a positive way. i used it as a stepping stone in order for me to get hired in my present job (as an employed staff nurse).:specs:

but since you're a new board passer, i suggest you finish all the trainings first (that most hospitals here require) such as your BLS and IVT... after you've finished those, apply apply apply!!!

apply in all the hospitals that would hire you as a staff nurse... and since it takes a looooonngg time for you to get some feedback from these hospitals, you could also volunteer in the meantime so that you won't forget nursing stuff and you also get to practice your nursing skills (this will come in handy when you're called for a clinical interview or skills exam). just make sure that the hospital where you're going to volunteer will allow you to do what hired nurses do and not the job of a nursing aid.

oh, and if you're going to volunteer:

- find a hospital near you (remember, they're not going to pay you, so it's better if it's walking distance)

- bring your own lunch/dinner (to save money)

- clarify with them what your work will be, the scope of your work and your responsibilities (do not accept if as a nursing aid or you'll just be doing vitals signs, bed making, etc.)

- ask them how long you'd be volunteering

- ask them if there is any chance you'd be absorbed as an employed staff nurse

- ask them if you're going to get a certificate after

let me clarify that i am not encouraging volunteering... it is really unfair for us nurses to be exploited by these hospitals. but with the situation we have here (plenty of nurses and few hospitals willing to hire), i think that we should just make the best out of the situation that we have. look at it as a chance to practice nursing - a venue to learn. but don't stop at volunteering... as i said earlier, make it a stepping stone for you to get a job and also to become a better nurse.

hope this helps! and goodluck to your nursing career!:specs:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9,778 Visitors; 644 Posts

I know an agency that are accepting volunteer nurse as an experience for New Zealand. A year of volunteering is enough and of course an ielts passer with a grade of 7 in all subtests. ;)

The last time I saw one like that (not for NZ) i investigated and discovered that they were schlepping volunteer nurses into caregiver positions in nursing homes which may pay poorly or well depending on the situation but it definitely doesn't count as nursing experience for the USA (as things stand now).

Basically make sure you get everything in writing, don't take someone's word for it and BE CAREFUL when dealing with agencies. These guys are trading people like merchandise, most of them really don't care about the individuals involved. That being said, there are a few that actually have decent ethics, too bad they are so hard to find.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,112 Visitors; 19 Posts

Volunteering is sacrifice and that's the essence of nursing philippines. Dont you agree?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

kyckerz has 1 years experience and specializes in School Nursing / Education.

2,622 Visitors; 130 Posts

Sacrifice in our part and exploitation for most hospitals... don't you agree? ^_^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

handyong specializes in Medical nursing.

821 Visitors; 5 Posts

you know, latinaVS, the situation here in the philippines is really different from that in US. To start with, healthcare in this country is not a priority bec. it is very expensive. before people spend for their health, they generally have to spend for their immediate needs like food, rent, education. Thus, private hopsitals mostly cater to those who can afford to pay for hospital bills and government hospitals usually have the marginalized as patients. Both struggle financially to keep hospital business afloat. Struggling would mean underpaying healthcare workers or not paying them at all in the guise of volunteer work. In fact, the big number of nursing grads have been a source of big business among hospitals and training institutions by charging fees to be trained or do volunteer work. The PNA has been sensitive enough to call the attention of the government and the hospitals to desist from exploiting the nurses. But as it is, nothing fruitful came out of it. Firstly, the government cannot stop these hospitals because they do not have job offers to these nurses. Its only now that they came up with a dirtective to deploy new grads to work in the provinces with pay. But then, implementing is another story. The new grads, for lack of job offers, also grab the chance to be volunteer workers, than being "out of the loop." Standing up for yourself is really a tough job especially when everyone else is thinking of survival...sad, isn't it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×