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Value of acceptance to a nondoctorate crna program

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Hi all, I have applied to both doctorate and nondoctorate crna schools. In the event that I do not get into the doctorate program and am admitted to the nondoctorate school, is it going to work against me when I graduate to not have a doctorate of nurse anesthesia? I would not want to waste all the time and money that would be involved only to find out when I have completed the program that I am unable to find employment or that it will be looked down upon. Any thoughts or insights to this situation would be helpful. Thanks!

Da_Milk_of_Amnesia, MSN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 5 years experience.

It's not written in stone yet and since there are only a handful of schools which offer it at this point, I cannot see it being a big deal in terms of landing a job after school. Im not getting a doctorate, and i wouldn't even if i had a full scholarship. It makes not sense to me at all, i can't call myself Doctor/Nurse Anesthetist so whats the big offing deal ? Waste of time and money if you ask me.

yes, I like that the nondoctorate programs are shorter and that means less living expenses and hopefully landing a job sooner after graduation. From what I could tell, it just seems that only the nursing schools that have a CRNA school have converted to a doctorate program...the others seem to not be doctorate. Are you enrolled in a nondoctorate program at this time?

Not a crna, but I plan on applying to doctorate programs. I shadowed pharmacists in a hospital many years ago. Some of them had a PharmD, and others had a masters (they graduated before the PharmD requirement). The hopsital they worked for had no preference for PharmD when it came to hiring in the actual pharmacy. However, it was a requirement that the director of pharmacy have a PharmD, so a lot of the pharmacists with masters degrees could not move up to that position no matter how long they had been there.

I think that the same will probably happen in a lot of places for crnas in the future. 20 years from now, I dont want to be passed up for a director opportunity for some young gun with less experience just because he/she has a doctorate and I dont.

CRNAs need to get out of the OR. The best combo would be to get a doctorate and MBA. Then run that **** and call the shots. Take that desk spot away from the MDA as well as the stool in the OR.

Haha..maybe 1 crna supervising 3 or 4 AAs? I love what crnas do hands on in pre-op, pacu, and OR so I dont think I would want a role like that for a while.

Some hospitals have chief crnas..what do they do? Supervise the other crnas like an anesthesiologist would?

RealNurse419

Specializes in Intensive Care (SICU, NICU, CICU, VICU). Has 6 years experience.

I think you should have done more research on the profession before applying. If you had done so, you would know that having a doctorate vs a masters doesn't really matter when trying to find a job.

calivianya, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

I think you should have done more research on the profession before applying. If you had done so, you would know that having a doctorate vs a masters doesn't really matter when trying to find a job.

That's what the OP is doing right now - research.

I'm sure several years ago ADN vs. BSN didn't matter either, but now you can't get hired at some hospitals as a RN without a BSN. I am wondering if CRNAs are likely to head the same direction in the future. With schools being currently pushed to make all CRNA programs doctorate programs eventually, one has to wonder if five or ten years down the road, that experienced CRNA with a master's is going to be passed over for a new grad DNAP to fit some magnet-like initiative...

RealNurse419

Specializes in Intensive Care (SICU, NICU, CICU, VICU). Has 6 years experience.

That's what the OP is doing right now - research.

I'm sure several years ago ADN vs. BSN didn't matter either, but now you can't get hired at some hospitals as a RN without a BSN. I am wondering if CRNAs are likely to head the same direction in the future. With schools being currently pushed to make all CRNA programs doctorate programs eventually, one has to wonder if five or ten years down the road, that experienced CRNA with a master's is going to be passed over for a new grad DNAP to fit some magnet-like initiative...

CRNA schools aren't even required to become doctorate programs until 2025. So again, a little research would prove that in 5-10 years, CRNAs with masters degrees will not be passed over for a new graduate with a DNP. At this present time, there aren't even enough doctorally prepared CRNAs to teach DNP programs. Hence the reason why the requirement is 2025....

RealNurse419

Specializes in Intensive Care (SICU, NICU, CICU, VICU). Has 6 years experience.

And I said "research would have been beneficial" because if one had a true concern about this, it would have been better to figure this out before applying

Edited by RealNurse419

I had the same question as you before. I decided on a MSN program. There's less time in school, less tuition, and the opportunity to really decide what kind of doctorate I would like to obtain and where I would like to go with a terminal degree. I think of it as ASN vs BSN. I felt my ASN program really helped me with the task of being a nurse and BSN helped me define what it means to be a nurse (if that makes sense? lol). I'm kind of viewing the MSN vs DNP the same way. To get a feel of the CRNA profession with a MSN and then pursue an area that I want to work on and get a terminal degree that would most benefit me in achieving it. Hope that makes sense.

I had the same question as you before. I decided on a MSN program. There's less time in school, less tuition, and the opportunity to really decide what kind of doctorate I would like to obtain and where I would like to go with a terminal degree. I think of it as ASN vs BSN. I felt my ASN program really helped me with the task of being a nurse and BSN helped me define what it means to be a nurse (if that makes sense? lol). I'm kind of viewing the MSN vs DNP the same way. To get a feel of the CRNA profession with a MSN and then pursue an area that I want to work on and get a terminal degree that would most benefit me in achieving it. Hope that makes sense.

You make a good point, I've never thought about it like that before. There are a lot of doctorates I'd rather have over a DNP honestly lol. But to be completely honest, I dont think I even care about having a doctorate of any kind other than for the career opportunities it might open up in the future.

sarahneeyah

Specializes in CVICU, Transplant ICU, CCRN. Has 15 years experience.

I think you should have done more research on the profession before applying. If you had done so, you would know that having a doctorate vs a masters doesn't really matter when trying to find a job.

Yep, there is always one. The OP stated that he or she already applied. On these sites, let us be kind enough to help each other without these smart...s answers. I am not trying to be rude but how do you know if he or she didn't do enough research before applying? Let us be more helpful to each other.

RealNurse419

Specializes in Intensive Care (SICU, NICU, CICU, VICU). Has 6 years experience.

Yep, there is always one. The OP stated that he or she already applied. On these sites, let us be kind enough to help each other without these smart...s answers. I am not trying to be rude but how do you know if he or she didn't do enough research before applying? Let us be more helpful to each other.

If you or anyone thinks that's a smart comment, I would suggest growing thicker skin. It was a straight forward opinion. It wasn't rude, it just wasn't filled with bubbly words. As previously stated, I said that because the OP stated that he/she had already applied to a masters program, but is now worried that they would be looked down upon after completion. In my opinion, that's something you should research before applying. If you don't think you'll be able to find a job after graduation because of the degree you chose, wouldn't that be something you'd consider research-worthy prior to applying? If you think my comment was rude, go to the "other" nursing anesthesia website and pose that same question. I guarantee you'll get rude comments. I still stand by my response.

But for you more thinner skinned people, here's a softer answer: A masters vs. doctorate program will not affect your ability to get a "clinical" job at this present time. I would venture to say it will not be an issue in the next 20 years. Nurse anesthesia schools aren't even required to become doctorate programs until 2025. What will affect job prospects are the skills that you acquire during your program (regional experience, independence). So, the more important question to ask is will you be a well-rounded clinician upon graduation.

I guess I have thin skin also.

sarahneeyah

Specializes in CVICU, Transplant ICU, CCRN. Has 15 years experience.

If you or anyone thinks that's a smart comment, I would suggest growing thicker skin. It was a straight forward opinion. It wasn't rude, it just wasn't filled with bubbly words. As previously stated, I said that because the OP stated that he/she had already applied to a masters program, but is now worried that they would be looked down upon after completion. In my opinion, that's something you should research before applying. If you don't think you'll be able to find a job after graduation because of the degree you chose, wouldn't that be something you'd consider research-worthy prior to applying? If you think my comment was rude, go to the "other" nursing anesthesia website and pose that same question. I guarantee you'll get rude comments. I still stand by my response.

But for you more thinner skinned people, here's a softer answer: A masters vs. doctorate program will not affect your ability to get a "clinical" job at this present time. I would venture to say it will not be an issue in the next 20 years. Nurse anesthesia schools aren't even required to become doctorate programs until 2025. What will affect job prospects are the skills that you acquire during your program (regional experience, independence). So, the more important question to ask is will you be a well-rounded clinician upon graduation.

You seem offended yet I need the thicker skin? It doesn't matter what site we are on. I believe that these sites were created for mature professionals to support and assist each other. Stop making excuses for being rude. All that I am saying is: If you can help one of your peers in making a serious decision regarding his or her future; then help. If your opinion sound like an insult; then keep your opinion to your d... Self. Don't be so upset because I called you out. You may not be use to it, but you come off a bit childish in your post. I totally agree with your point that an MSN shouldn't be a problem for the OP; it was your delivery that needed work. Don't be offended. I wish you the best and this is not to offend anyone. But, we need to be more respectful of others when they come on these sites for guidance.

missnurse01, MSN, RN

Has 18 years experience.

I have heard some sites in nova are preferring doctorate over masters for new grads. But thats all I have heard so far as there are not many doctorate grads out there yet