Jump to content
Additional Hardware Upgrades Read more... ×
Nurse Beth Nurse Beth, MSN (Advice Column) Writer Innovator Expert Nurse Verified

Unappreciated at my Job

Nurse Beth   (852 Views 4 Comments)
45 Likes; 8 Followers; 81 Articles; 222,797 Visitors; 1,593 Posts
If you find this topic helpful leave a comment.
advertisement

Dear Nurse Beth,

 

I have been working on my own unit for the past 3 years. In those 3 years, I have been faithfully committed to two committees, I am a trained charge nurse who has been running an entire overflow unit for months, I am graduating in May with my Masters Degree, and I have made myself available to fill the needs of the hospital when they occur day shift or night shift. I do all of this because I have been wanting to go into management with my company. My direct manager is very aware of my intentions and has been encouraging me over the last year to start applying for positions.

 

A position opened up on my own unit to which I applied and did not get. Even though I feel more qualified than the person who did receive the job, I am not going to pretend I know exactly what factors were considered. However, this decision has made me feel extremely unappreciated and undervalued as an employee. My question is, is it time to move on? Should I pursue other opportunities entirely? A coworker mentioned travel nursing that sounds really interesting but is it worth leaving a company I've invested so much time and effort into over the last three years?

Thank you for your advice,

Unappreciated.


Dear Unappreciated,

Feeling undervalued does drive loyal and talented nurses into the arms of competing organizations.

Have a talk with your manager and see if you can get a sense of whether or not she thinks you have a chance for advancement. Of course she can't promise you anything, but if she encourages you, then hang in there.

Staying in a unit and working under the person who got the job you applied for can be difficult, but an opportunity for remaining gracious and showing maturity. I know a nurse who was charge nurse, made temporary manager of her unit, applied for permanent manager, didn't get it, and was made charge again. Today (1.5 yrs later) she is the successful manager of the unit.

You do not say how long you've been a nurse, but if it's 3 years, it's not all that long. If you've only applied to 1 position, don't give up yet. Keep applying.

Traveling will not advance your career in management.

Best wishes,

Nurse Beth

Author, "Your Last Nursing Class: How to Land Your First Nursing Job"...and your next!

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=26301&stc=1

Edited by tnbutterfly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some units will not hire a nurse who has been working on that unit as a floor nurse to be that unit's manager, as this can cause a great deal of difficulty for both the floor nurses and the new manager. Particularly someone who has never been a manager before, this may be a heavy consideration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you ask why you were not selected and what you can do to increase your chances of a management position in the hospital? With your charge experience, you could apply for a management poisiton elsewhere.

I would try to find out why I wasn't selected so that the next management position will go to you next time. I would probably feel the same way you do, but if I really wanted something, I wouldn't let the disapointment stop me from getting it.

There's nothing wrong with telling them how you feel. I made a mistake of leaving a job because I felt unappreciated and in retrospect, I wish I would have said something to them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Can you ask why you were not selected and what you can do to increase your chances of a management position in the hospital? With your charge experience, you could apply for a management poisiton elsewhere.

I would try to find out why I wasn't selected so that the next management position will go to you next time. I would probably feel the same way you do, but if I really wanted something, I wouldn't let the disapointment stop me from getting it.

There's nothing wrong with telling them how you feel. I made a mistake of leaving a job because I felt unappreciated and in retrospect, I wish I would have said something to them.

I don't think is such a good approach to figuring out why you didn't get the job and dealing with it.

Do it the way Beth suggested.

You might want to consider being less available, stop working both shifts, etc. If you are less valuable in your staff nurse position, perhaps you will be more attractive as a manager. I guess that sounds perverse and contrary and I don't know if it's good advice or not. Just a random thought that came to my mind.

Whatever you do, try to not let your hurt and anger show. Do what Beth said. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×