Hospital cancelled my contract due to inexperience...

  1. It was my first travel nursing assignment.

    I relocated to Tennessee, spent $1800 in rent, supplies, etc., and I was let go by the hospital for inexperience.

    They went on to say that they needed someone who could hit the floor and didn't need any instruction and wouldn't ask a lot of questions. To be honest, I completely agree. I was being floated every night and the amount of mastery needed to meet expectations was staggering. I don't understand, though. The travelers that used to frequent my old unit needed all kinds of help! I even told my recruiter that I wasn't welcome there - which I wasn't. They approved me for another assignment but I haven't heard back from them in days.

    My license was TN temporary.

    I'm thinking of moving back home, else I have to find employment as a staff nurse here which I'm too depressed to do.

    Questions:

    1.) Do I have to alert the state boards or some other agency that I will be leaving? I don't want the license to lapse or for anyone to think I'm practicing w/ an expired license.

    2.) Do I have to put this experience down or let my potential future employer know on my resume?

    Thanks.
  2. Visit BeccaroseRN profile page

    About BeccaroseRN

    Joined: Sep '18; Posts: 4; Likes: 2

    32 Comments

  3. by   Been there,done that
    You were set up for failure by a a greedy agency. The hospital and the agency are at fault, not you. The BON does not care.

    Any reputable agency would know what is expected of you. Travel nursing if very difficult.

    Leave it off your resume.

    Carry on.
  4. by   BeccaroseRN
    You're absolutely correct!

    They could care less. I'm basically stranded and they've left me high and dry. Do I need to do something about my temporary TN license?

    Thank you for your response.
  5. by   klone
    How long have you been a nurse?
  6. by   Ms_Interpret
    Quote from klone
    How long have you been a nurse?
    The agency is responsible for vetting each candidate based on the facility's needs and expectations. The nurse's qualifications are assessed before the contract is even offered, generally. If the facility agrees that the candidate is a good fit experience-wise, the facility offers the position. If the candidate's experience and credentials are not in line with the facility's needs, that should have been addressed by the facility and the agency before the traveler ever dared to venture out to the assignment.
  7. by   BeccaroseRN
    2 years -
  8. by   cleback
    Sorry that happened.

    Doesnt the agency usually help with relocation fees? 1800 is a lot to spend out of pocket.
  9. by   Emergent
    Quote from Ms_Interpret
    The agency is responsible for vetting each candidate based on the facility's needs and expectations. The nurse's qualifications are assessed before the contract is even offered, generally. If the facility agrees that the candidate is a good fit experience-wise, the facility offers the position. If the candidate's experience and credentials are not in line with the facility's needs, that should have been addressed by the facility and the agency before the traveler ever dared to venture out to the assignment.
    Lol, she just asked a logical question. I'm sure klone knows how agencies work!
  10. by   Ms_Interpret
    Quote from Emergent
    Lol, she just asked a logical question. I'm sure klone knows how agencies work!
    If you ask a question you already know the answer to, it's a rhetorical question. And the reason most often used for asking a rhetorical question is to cast aspersions on a participant in a discussion. I was giving klone the benefit of the doubt....

    Are you saying I shouldn't have?
  11. by   klone
    Good ****. I was asking a question. And no, I didn't know the answer, which is why I asked. I was going to suggest that you might have better luck as a traveler with a few more years under your belt. Don't give it up entirely, but maybe spend a bit more time getting comfortable in the role. Traveling is HARD.

    And I agree with whomever said that your agency should have paid your rent (or given you a housing stipend) - that should not have come out of your pocket.

    A lot of nurses who travel use more than one agency.
  12. by   Ms_Interpret
    Quote from klone
    Good ****. I was asking a question. And no, I didn't know the answer, which is why I asked. I was going to suggest that you might have better luck as a traveler with a few more years under your belt. Don't give it up entirely, but maybe spend a bit more time getting comfortable in the role. Traveling is HARD.

    And I agree with whomever said that your agency should have paid your rent (or given you a housing stipend) - that should not have come out of your pocket.

    A lot of nurses who travel use more than one agency.
    I think you need a hug. Emergent, you should give klone a hug.
  13. by   NedRN
    Quote from BeccaroseRN
    You're absolutely correct!

    They could care less. I'm basically stranded and they've left me high and dry. Do I need to do something about my temporary TN license?

    Thank you for your response.
    If you want to work in TN the next couple of years, get the perm. Otherwise, don't worry about it.
  14. by   danedsel
    I've always found travel nursing similar to working for a temp agency.

    I did these temp assignments for about 5 years in Los Angeles. Within about 3 hours you'd know if an assignment would work out and you'd be back the next day. Sometimes, your recruiter would call on your lunch break and say you were done for trumped-up reasons or deluded suspicions.

    Basically, the client (hospital) is where the money is and virtually any reason justifies cancellation. Just remember that (unfortunately) half of all nursing is now from the computer. All outstanding tasks and required documentation must be completed. In other words, anything that can be readily checked with mouse clicks must be addressed. This includes medication being passed out on time.

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