Jump to content

Transition from step down to ccu

Posted

Specializes in Cath/EP lab, CCU, Cardiac stepdown. Has 3 years experience.

So as a little background, I am a new grad with roughly 6 months of experience now in a cardiac progressive care. I was wondering how many of you ccu nurses started in a step down unit first? How was your experience? How much orientation did they give you?

I would appreciate the same info! I am a new grad applying to a PCU and I'm really excited to hopefully start on the floor. Any advice or points as starting off as a new grad in a PCU?

RescueNinjaKy

Specializes in Cath/EP lab, CCU, Cardiac stepdown. Has 3 years experience.

I guess what I'm saying is that as a cardiac pcu nurse, I am afraid that the ccu will be completely different and that if I do transfer there one day I won't have enough orientation. I feel that because I have some cardiac background, I will receive less orientation. On average how much orientation did y'all get?

Also bump bump bump, where all my cardiac nurses at?

5678kma

Specializes in Cardiac, CV Surg, Transplant, PCU.

I accepted a position on a cardiothoracic (mainly cardiovascular) surgical/transplant unit. I am so excited but also am curious how difficult this transition will be and how steep the learning curve will be. I am scheduled to have 3-4 months of orientation to the institution and floor, with a foundations of critical care course included. We can ask for more orientation at the end of the 3-4 months if we feel it is needed. I hope I'm not biting off too much though!

I'd love to hear how I can start preparing from some cardiac nurses.

Stratiotes

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 4 years experience.

I think whether or not people are successful in ICU (or any new setting) largely depends on personality. We mostly get nurses who transfer after a year on tele, but we've also hired on med/surg transfers, and even new grads. Some do well, some don't. I think if you are one who seeks out learning opportunity and experience, remains humble, asks lots of questions, and learn who you can go to for help, you will do fine. Having a good orientation with a knowledgeable preceptor is also important.

RescueNinjaKy

Specializes in Cath/EP lab, CCU, Cardiac stepdown. Has 3 years experience.

I think whether or not people are successful in ICU (or any new setting) largely depends on personality. We mostly get nurses who transfer after a year on tele, but we've also hired on med/surg transfers, and even new grads. Some do well, some don't. I think if you are one who seeks out learning opportunity and experience, remains humble, asks lots of questions, and learn who you can go to for help, you will do fine. Having a good orientation with a knowledgeable preceptor is also important.

In your opinion, what kind of personality do you think is best suited for critical care. I have my own opinions of course, but I was just wondering what the perspective is like from someone in the critical care field.

sjalv

Specializes in CVICU. Has 1 years experience.

In your opinion, what kind of personality do you think is best suited for critical care. I have my own opinions of course, but I was just wondering what the perspective is like from someone in the critical care field.

I work in a cardiovascular ICU. I think the most important personality traits to possess include the ability to remain calm under pressure. Many people say they can, but when push comes to shove many can't. Equally important is knowing your limitations. If you don't know how to do something, admit it. I've been off orientation for 6 months now and recently had a patient who had intraabdominal pressure monitoring & who was chemically paralyzed. I asked the offgoing nurse to show me how to shoot the IAP numbers and how to assess a train of 4. You cannot be too proud to ask for help when you don't know something or you may be putting a patient's life in danger because you won't be able to care for them completely. Finally, this goes hand in hand with the previous point, but knowing when to ask for help. If you think a patient is going downhill, go ask someone. Do not fear looking stupid. It isn't about your ego, it's about the patient's life. Good luck.