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Terminated the third week into my orientation

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HippyHappyRN has 1 years experience and specializes in Grad Nurse.

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You are reading page 7 of Terminated the third week into my orientation. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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7 hours ago, HeartbrokenBabyNurse said:

I can’t iterate enough how many people have reached out to me and told me what a bullet I dodged working on this unit with this particular manager. Could they have been just being nice to me? Sure. But it came from people that work within that hospital so they have more experience with this person than I do.

It's possible that you indeed dodged a bullet.

I think it was ridiculous of them to even mention the tardiness related to the badge. The one they gave you was not programmed correctly. At (most of) the places I have been someone would have apologized to you (not have expected an apology from you). For that.

But more things went wrong. And it isn't that something (else) went wrong; it's what what happened next. Every one of us can expect to have something go wrong at some point. So you woke up late for class. Not great, but usually not a deal-breaker. This is no time to be texting a friend about it, though; it's time to call whomever is your upline, your manager or even the house supervisor...some live person, and inform them that you are supposed to be somewhere and you're on your way.

This is standard expectation in the nursing world. For many of us in acute care/inpatient nursing, not following the proper late/call-out procedure is considered "no call, no show" and subject to disciplinary action. There must be very extenuating circumstances involved if not following the notification procedure. But I don't think that's why you were terminated either.

If you really did tell your manager/clinical coordinator that you were told it would be no trouble to reschedule the class you missed, and if you didn't indicate that it was another orientee who told you this, then *that* was likely your fatal mistake. That is essentially what is called a "lie by omission;" you implied that you discussed all of this with the proper people, and allowed someone to think something that wasn't true based on what you didn't say.

So....it doesn't matter whether the manager is an ogre or not. It doesn't matter whether it was your aunt or the pope who told you that this woman is difficult. It just doesn't matter. We often don't control the consequences of our mess-ups, but if integrity is compromised we have even less control and fewer options for rectifying things.

These comments are offered w/ helpful intent and are solely in response to sentiments in the quote above. I fully believe you can and will move forward successfully if you understand all of the concepts involved.

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99 Posts; 358 Profile Views

WOW!. That is rough . I worked about 40 years as an LPN, in 3 different states through that time. I was never late, not one time. I was taught in nursing school, you get up and be there, on time. I even worked 2 jobs at once for awhile, and looking back I don't know how I did it, but I was always on time. I was chasing that dollar bill and to get it I had to be there on time. I didn't want to be docked not one hour. I'm still payingbforbthose 2 jobs tho, in bad sleep habits and I've been retired now about 9 years . hard to,get back to normal.

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On 3/4/2020 at 10:03 PM, Emergent said:

You sound like a high school student, actually. Time to put your big girl panties on. This is real life.

When your employer cuts up your badge in front of you, I think it's pretty obvious that you are probably not going to get a job with that organization.

Yeah, I was kind of surprised to read that you thought you would be able to be hired at that same hospital. That'll say anything at your exit interview/firing. IDK what to say about divulging that on your resume. Some places will retain the right to fire if you lie on an application. However, for obvious reasons, it'll be difficult to show a 3 week employment. If you do divulge it, you could try to spin it. Be honest and state the truth and then say that there was a personality/culture clash, and for a variety of reasons, you and the director decided it was best to not continue on a 12 week orientation if you weren't going to be a good fit for that unit/hospital. You wouldn't want to waste their time/resources/money, etc. Most HR people would see right through that. But, may also respect your honesty in the matter.

I will say...that I don't think you should work LTC if that was not your original goal. And once you get hired by a new hospital, DO NOT let your anxiety over the last affect you moving forward. Act as if it is your first job post-grad and do your best. In a few years, none of this will matter. And you absolutely will work L&D again, if you work towards it. Good luck!

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487 Posts; 6,792 Profile Views

Eligible for rehire status is not about getting another job with the same organization. It's about being able to get a job with another organization.

It's all about what's technically possible vs what's actually done.

When a manager cuts up your badge in front of you, that means the hospital isn't going to give you an interview any time soon, even if you technically could be hired onto another unit tomorrow.

When another organization calls up the hospital to enquire about your employment and hears you are eligible for rehire, that means you've got a good shot at the other job.

Many people will say that a previous employer can only verify your dates of employment and if you are eligible for rehire. That's absolutely false. As long as they don't lie, previous employers are able to say whatever true things they want about you. But, as a matter of practice, most only will give dates and hire status because it's easier for them.

I have no idea if such a brief employment needs to be included on a resume, or if an omission of the termination would be lying on an application. It was during the probation period where either the hospital or the employee can back out for any reason so I don't know if it "counts" as a job or not. But in general, being eligible for rehire is mostly about not holding you back as you seek alternate employment, not a reasonable hope of actually being rehired.

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Hoosier_RN has 27 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

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12 hours ago, HeartbrokenBabyNurse said:

7 years.. is that normal?

And no I did not get it in writing, it was verbally said to me but I did have a witness on the phone during the termination because I felt it was in my best interest to have a witness.

3-7 years is pretty standard. Verbal, even with a witness, on either side, is iffy, as it becomes he said/she said. In writing is objective. As another poster stated they will say anything to get you out the door, so to speak, without violence. In today's world, people have been known to snap for much less.

I wish you luck and success, you are at the beginning of your career, and I'm sure that you've learned your lesson.

Edited by Hoosier_RN

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HippyHappyRN has 1 years experience and specializes in Grad Nurse.

51 Posts; 938 Profile Views

5 hours ago, Wuzzie said:

Any reason you can't move closer to your new job?

We’re buying our house from my father in law and I have children in the school system.

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Kuriin has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Emergency.

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I am sorry you were fired...but, you did deserve it. You were late not once, but multiple times during orientation. You say you are punctual but you did not show that at all.

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HippyHappyRN has 1 years experience and specializes in Grad Nurse.

51 Posts; 938 Profile Views

Everyone. I appreciate all of your words. I am overwhelmed with how many people are willing to give me help and their advice and I can’t be more grateful during this time for that.

That being said - I AM new. I do not believe my “termination” reflects my ability to be a great nurse for many reasons other than the blurbs you’ve gotten to share with me about my situation so that’s why I was questioning working at the same hospital, not just the same unit. It seems a little far fetched to me that I won’t be able to work within this hospital for 7 years due to sleeping over once as a new grad. I understand what I did was not kosher but I’m also not willing to let it set the tone for the rest of my career. I refuse to let this mishap define me despite my anxiety moving forward. I come from a long line of nurses and I know all about setting alarms and being on time and how to do it. It was an unfortunate mistake that I will never repeat again no matter how much advice I get. That’s the one thing I know without any advice.

As far as texting the friend - I did it just to let them know I was on the way - common habit of ours while we were in school if one of us was running late. In retrospect, yes, 1000% I should have spoken to someone with authority. I am aware. I wasn’t expecting to be told I could reschedule. I didn’t understand the gravity of that at the time.

Thank you guys for giving me your time and input. Some of my words have been taken a different way than I would’ve liked them to but eh, that’s the internet for you. I meant no harm. My humor gets in the way sometimes with people I don’t necessarily have to be serious with. I hope I can wrap a nice bow on this subject now and move on with my life LOL. Happy nursing guys! You’re all rockstars in my book.

6 minutes ago, Kuriin said:

I am sorry you were fired...but, you did deserve it. You were late not once, but multiple times during orientation. You say you are punctual but you did not show that at all.

🤦🏼‍♀️

Edited by HeartbrokenBabyNurse

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HippyHappyRN has 1 years experience and specializes in Grad Nurse.

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Well aren’t you just a peach 😅

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Kuriin has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Emergency.

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Hey, I did say "sorry" that you were fired. Hopefully you'll be able to find something else soon.

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hannahgb has 46 years experience and specializes in retire-numerous.

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HeartbrokenBabyNurse--Your response to Emergent did sound like a what a high school person would say--You need to ,learn responsibility and accountability and your life will become easier. Put your best foot forward and realize you messed up---Now is the time to move forward with a better perspective of the real world.

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1 hour ago, HeartbrokenBabyNurse said:

Well aren’t you just a peach 😅

I think we are seeing glimpses of what the employer saw, as so astutely suggested by previous posters.

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