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Tape use in Neonates

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cagedbear cagedbear (New) New

Specializes in NICU. Has 23 years experience.

I am looking for a concensus on which tape works best on a neonates skin to secure IV's. I like the transpore (clear) tape. My hospital also uses a cloth tape (doesn't stick well). I hate the paper tape, as it seems to melt into the babies skin when under the warmer or in humidity. The "pink" tape works good for feeding tubes and cannulas, but not IV'S. Any comments? :twocents::up::down:

littleneoRN

Specializes in NICU. Has 6 years experience.

We use clear tape because it sticks well, and it's transparent. Or at least as transparent as tape comes. Transparent dressing and tape is important for allowing you to assess your IV site. We put bits of cotton on the tape to reduce the stickiness on the skin. We don't really use pink tape for almost anything because it's so sticky and can really hurt when it comes off. Cloth tape just doesn't stick well and doesn't let you assess well.

neonatal_nurse

Specializes in NICU, Nursery.

Transpore is fine, as long as you use a splint to immobilize the IV area, and as much as possible avoid in getting it in contact with the skin. We use gauze as well to anchor it more. The other tapes don't work as much as they don't stick very well.

karnicurnc

Specializes in L/D 4 yrs & Level 3 NICU 15 yrs. Has 19 years experience.

We use tegaderm and silk tape for PIVs. After the catheter is inserted and patency is assured, we place the tegaderm over the site and around the hub of the catheter. Then we use silk tape to make a chevron or other similar shape to further secure the hub to the baby. More silk tape is used to secure the connected tubing and an arm/hand board if necessary. The trick is using enough tape, but not too much. We often use a double-back piece on the upper part of the extremity to keep the board on. For scalp IVs we use the same materials, but have found that KY jelly helps tape stick better and is WAY less toxic than benzoin or mastisol. PICC lines have a different kind of tape job altogether, using tegaderm and steristrips. Hope this helps! ;)

cagedbear

Specializes in NICU. Has 23 years experience.

Thanks to everyone! Lots of good info! Keep it coming! :thankya:

NeoNurseTX, RN

Specializes in NICU Level III.

We use tegaderm and silk tape for PIVs. After the catheter is inserted and patency is assured, we place the tegaderm over the site and around the hub of the catheter. Then we use silk tape to make a chevron or other similar shape to further secure the hub to the baby. More silk tape is used to secure the connected tubing and an arm/hand board if necessary. The trick is using enough tape, but not too much. We often use a double-back piece on the upper part of the extremity to keep the board on. For scalp IVs we use the same materials, but have found that KY jelly helps tape stick better and is WAY less toxic than benzoin or mastisol. PICC lines have a different kind of tape job altogether, using tegaderm and steristrips. Hope this helps! ;)

We do this but instead of the silk tape, we use transpore.

preemieRNkate, RN

Specializes in Level III NICU. Has 7 years experience.

We do this but instead of the silk tape, we use transpore.

Ditto. We use steri-strips to make the chevron. I also cut a small steri in half (across) and I place that across the angio above the insertion site to secure it sometimes prior to putting the tegaderm over the whole site.

prmenrs, RN

Specializes in NICU, Infection Control. Has 42 years experience.

I still say staple 'em!

(jk:behindpc: :sofahider :chair:)

We are trying to get away from using any tape directly on our babies' skin because of the damage it causes, especially in micro-preemies. They make a "gel" strip to use instead of tape, or we put Extra Thin Duoderm (a breathable hydrocolloid) on the skin and then use a silk tape over that.

RM-RN

Specializes in NICU.

We use the Tegaderm that's made especially for securing IV's. It comes with two extra medipore strips for chevroning the hub and securing the tubing. They're small enough that they don't extend beyond the Tegaderm edges. With the babies that nothing sticks to, we sometimes will picture frame the edges of the Tegaderm with transpore.