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Taking CNA exam Friday? Need help and advice!

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Hello it am taking the cna exam Friday. I live in NC which is a challenge state so I took only a one day class which was to say the least very unhelpful. I only actually performed hand washing and ambulatory stocking the rest of the skills I've never performed. I was looking for some tips and advice. Also what skills you got when you took the test? Lastly when I went to the class I got a textbook thing that had stuff for written and list of skills and steps. The skills and steps are more detailed than the booklet that person vue makes so my last question is will I be find going by the Pearson vue booklet? Thanks so much in advance!

wow a one day class? I'd have to agree that was a waiste of time. Are you in nursing school at all? You might be able to pass the test, but without any nursing training I can't see you having the knowledge you need to do your job properly with only a one day class. I know we CNAs are not licenced, but there are things to learn that you need to know to be a successful CNA that you would not just know without some decent class time.

I'd say one really good place to go to know how to do the skills is on Youtube there is a page called 4yourcna. They do a wonderful job showing how each skill is to be done. Also a part of your grade for skills test is not just the skill itself but they grade you on your interpersonal skills as well. So it might seem weird to talk to a maniquan but 4yourcna does this very well.

SeattleJess

Specializes in None yet..

Are you certified as a CNA in another state? Or are you trying to get a first job by challenging?

Believe me, working as a CNA is a demanding job. Even if you go to an excellent program, there is still a steep learning curve on your first job. I'm working harder than I've ever worked during my orientation after a very good program. Please, give yourself the foundation you need to be able to do this important job. CNAs are the gatekeepers. Low paid, maybe low status... but SO IMPORTANT!

4yourCNA is a great resource but bottom line is: get the pamphlet from your state board. It will tell you the skills you need to know, the steps for each skill, and which steps are critical. Know them. Do them. And expect to learn something different when you are in practice.

Wishing you the best. Don't give up if you flub the first test. Health care needs you!!!

Thank you both! I am actually not really looking to be a CNA. I am applying to nursing school this year which now requires you be a cna in advance before being accepted. So that's why I went with a one day class opposed to the community college route because I am a full time student and the require cna liscence was a last minute change in my university's program

Well good luck in challenging the test. All you can do at this point is practice the skills as much as you can and try to get the steps down. Hopefully not going to a class that could have showed you ALL the skills won't hurt your chances at passing.

Jess I can not agree with you more about how important CNA training and learning really is. We don't need to know as much as a nurse does but there are BASIC HEALTH that we CNAs have to know and learn. We need to know how to take vitals PROPERLY, we need to know signs of things such as strokes, heart attacks extra. Help you know how to handle situations like a resident attacking you or what the residents rights are, what we can and can not do as a care taker. All these are very important to know to do our jobs. Yet I think that many people see CNA work as a job any monkey can do and they want to take the easy way out and just challange the test and get their certificates and work in a nursing home thinking they'll just learn on the job. These are the CNAs that will lie on their vitals or not have a clue what the nurse is talking about when they say why is so and sos bed not made properly.

Those in nursing school I understand to just challenge the exam because it is only a review of what you learn in nursing school. It is only the ones that say I want to be a CNA but I don't want to be bothered to paying the 500 dollars for a 6 week class. Can't I just challenge the test and get certified. You could challenge and even pass but I don't think you will be a good CNA for it

Edited by mvm2

I know hand washing and a type of measurement will be included. The NC pamphlet is correct. Follow the steps. The bold lettering means if you miss that step...you would fail. I start clinicals this week and after that...I'll take my state test. Good luck with your test.

TSgtRodrigues, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 2 years experience.

Did you learn how to take blood pressure manually? Or do you already know how? That is part of a CNA skill set. You have to make sure you can make a bed with a person in it! You have to make sure you give a bed bath properly as well. I really don't see how you will pass unless you have medical knowledge already. While. CNA is not a license, it is still a pretty decently difficult test. I do not new how a one day class has prepared you well enough to pass the state board. If you can't take it at the community college maybe the local adult school has classes? Or other schools that have a 21day course or even an evenings only course.?

SeattleJess

Specializes in None yet..

Thank you both! I am actually not really looking to be a CNA. I am applying to nursing school this year which now requires you be a cna in advance before being accepted. So that's why I went with a one day class opposed to the community college route because I am a full time student and the require cna liscence was a last minute change in my university's program(emphasis added)

That doesn't mean you can scrimp on your CNA skills; if anything, it means you need to pay even more attention to them because your program expects you to have some fundamental skills in place when you start. You may find yourself running to catch up.

I applied to a nursing school that requires CNA licensing as a prerequisite. The advisor explained that students were expected to begin nursing school with the CNA skills that were formerly taught in first quarter fundamentals of nursing; that is why CNA licensure was a prerequisite. Another school (the one I decided to attend) admits on a points system with significant points given for CNA or EMT licensure and experience. I applied there with a 4.0 GPA and a license without experience but I scored just at the cutoff for admittance. One less point and I would not have made it.

This indicates to me that CNA skills are vital to success in nursing school, whether you pick them up before or soon after starting. Like you, I began the process thinking I'd just check off a requirement, like statistics. However, the more I learned, the more I realized CNA skills are fundamental. I didn't want to be way behind my class, so I started working as a CNA as soon as I could. I quickly discovered that as tough as passing the state exam was, it was nothing compared to using them in the real world.

Hope you don't shortchange yourself by minimizing the importance of CNA skills!

SeattleJess

Specializes in None yet..

Those in nursing school I understand to just challenge the exam because it is only a review of what you learn in nursing school. It is only the ones that say I want to be a CNA but I don't want to be bothered to paying the 500 dollars for a 6 week class. Can't I just challenge the test and get certified. You could challenge and even pass but I don't think you will be a good CNA for it

I agree, mvm2, that if you've learned the skills in nursing school it's smarter to challenge the exam. If your nursing school is requiring CNA certification so it can cutback on the amount of instruction it gives first quarter students and have them "hit the ground running," well, that's a different situation, I think.

Sadly, I and many of my classmates had that "monkey" thinking about CNAs when we came in green. It doesn't take more than a few hours working with experienced and skilled CNAs to realize that if we're monkeys, we're on The Planet of the Apes. At the LTC where I work, CNAs are the ones who spot almost all the issues for the nurses (who are tied to the medications). We are the nurses eyes, ears and hands.

When I'm a nurse, I will treat my CNAs like the invaluable and knowledgeable professionals I now know them to be!

I took the CNA exam in another state. I had hand hygiene, measuring urinary output, PPE, assist with bedpan, and catheter care.

I went through a program that barely used the skills lab, so I did most of the skills prep on my own by watching YouTube videos (RMayor and 4yourCNA) and practicing on my bf. It is possible to pass! You just have to be willing to put in the effort to compensate.

I recommend watching a video on how to check blood pressure (I know people who failed because they forgot what to do during the actual exam). Remember to tighten the knob on the bulb all the way to the right before pumping. This allows all of the air to flow into the cuff until you release it. If you do not hear anything with the stethoscope in your ears, turn the bell until you hear it click into place. In my state they loosen the knob on the BP cuff and turn off the stethoscope to see if you know how to adjust the equipment.

Actually practicing the skills on a friend/mannequin helped me learn them much faster than reading the Pearson Vue book over and over again.

Good luck! You can do it! Message me if you have any questions :-)

I can understand this but I really didn't have time to take a full class with clinicals. I start class in two weeks and am taking 16 credit hours so I realize that I have a lot to learn but I really didn't have any other option at this point

I purchased stuff for blood pressure and have been practicing I think I have that down now. Making a bed is not a skill in NC

Thank you for being one that really answered my question and didn't criticize my choice of taking a one day class! I will check out those videos and I did buy stuff to practice blood pressure on been working on it a lot. I'll message you for anything else!

That doesn't mean you can scrimp on your CNA skills; if anything, it means you need to pay even more attention to them because your program expects you to have some fundamental skills in place when you start. You may find yourself running to catch up.

I applied to a nursing school that requires CNA licensing as a prerequisite. The advisor explained that students were expected to begin nursing school with the CNA skills that were formerly taught in first quarter fundamentals of nursing; that is why CNA licensure was a prerequisite. Another school (the one I decided to attend) admits on a points system with significant points given for CNA or EMT licensure and experience. I applied there with a 4.0 GPA and a license without experience but I scored just at the cutoff for admittance. One less point and I would not have made it.

This indicates to me that CNA skills are vital to success in nursing school, whether you pick them up before or soon after starting. Like you, I began the process thinking I'd just check off a requirement, like statistics. However, the more I learned, the more I realized CNA skills are fundamental. I didn't want to be way behind my class, so I started working as a CNA as soon as I could. I quickly discovered that as tough as passing the state exam was, it was nothing compared to using them in the real world.

Hope you don't shortchange yourself by minimizing the importance of CNA skills!

Hmmm not sure where you live but here you can't attend two schools at once so that Knocks out the only school that would seem to pass your standard of judgment and me not short hand the task of being a CNA. If I don't want to be a CNA I don't see why it matters. I'm going to learn what I need to know in Nursing School my advisor recommended I take just a day class. I didn't ask this question for y'all two people to criticize my choice in one day class. I asked to see what skills you got and any pointers

Remember the basics...

When entering:

knock, greet the resident, say your name and what procedure you'll be doing, pull curtain for privacy, gather supplies

When leaving:

Call light within reach, bed in lowest position, pull back privacy curtain so they can see their surroundings, side rails up, dirty linen goes in designated dirty area, wash hands

^^This applies to the skills where you interact with the resident. Learn this and then apply it to those skills, that way you can focus on the few specific steps involved with that skill instead of all 14 or whatever is listed in the Pearson Vue book. You don't need to do this for things like PPE because you stand in front of the proctor and simply put the gown on, etc.

If you're dealing with liquids/body fluids remember gloves (brushing teeth/dentures, anything with urine, bathing).

Remember the bold steps are critical and you must do them in the order listed.

When ambulating the resident make sure they have nonskid shoes on, their feet are flat on the ground, and the bed is locked (wheelchair too if needed) before you attempt to move them.

Fluids: dump in toilet, rinse, dry, container goes in designated dirty area

um there was a reason that I pointedly asked you if you were in nursing school. Because I know that if you were it makes sence to maybe not take a 6 week course in it because like you said you will be learning this in nursing. i only was agreeing with you when you yourself said the one day class was unhelpful. My only critism was that I don't know how anyone taking a one day course and not have taken any nursing courses yet could with confidence go into the test feeling they knew what they needed to pass. That I was agreeing with you that one day is not enough. And that I thought I was being helpful to you by giving you the 4yourcna page. my little rant if you will was not directed at you only some people that think that they can take short cuts to becoming a CNA

Remember the basics...

When entering:

knock, greet the resident, say your name and what procedure you'll be doing, pull curtain for privacy, gather supplies

When leaving:

Call light within reach, bed in lowest position, pull back privacy curtain so they can see their surroundings, side rails up, dirty linen goes in designated dirty area, wash hands

^^This applies to the skills where you interact with the resident. Learn this and then apply it to those skills, that way you can focus on the few specific steps involved with that skill instead of all 14 or whatever is listed in the Pearson Vue book. You don't need to do this for things like PPE because you stand in front of the proctor and simply put the gown on, etc.

If you're dealing with liquids/body fluids remember gloves (brushing teeth/dentures, anything with urine, bathing).

Remember the bold steps are critical and you must do them in the order listed.

When ambulating the resident make sure they have nonskid shoes on, their feet are flat on the ground, and the bed is locked (wheelchair too if needed) before you attempt to move them.

Fluids: dump in toilet, rinse, dry, container goes in designated dirty area

When you say make sure the steps are in order I have a question about that. So for like transfer from bed to wheelchair the steps go fold up rest check bed is at safe level then lock wheel chair then lock bed do I have to do it in that order? I would do it where I do the footrest up then lock the wheel chair then do the bed stuff. It would just make more sense to me