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Stupid, lazy, or ADHD?

Nurses Article   (11,004 Views 23 Replies 666 Words)
by canigraduate canigraduate (Member)

3 Articles; 34,961 Visitors; 2,107 Posts

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A lot of people don't know the difference between stupid, lazy, or ADHD. Misinformation abounds. This article is the first in a series to help clear up some of the confusion. You are reading page 2 of Stupid, lazy, or ADHD?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

3 Articles; 34,961 Visitors; 2,107 Posts

I work with a few people who claim the diagnosis of ADHD. One in particular is an ER tech. I don't know enough about his particular disorder to classify it, but it is obvious to all of those who work with him that he lacks focus. He is good at his job when you can get him to do it and in a timely manner, but more often than not the nurses end up doing his tasks themselves once we discover that he hasn't done it. He is always engaged in a conversation with someone, staff or patients, and can never tear himself away from that conversation immediately to do the task assigned, frequently taking 20-30 minutes before starting a task when he could have completed several in the same time frame. Every shift finds him having gotten "lost" for ridiculous amounts of time on the way back from transporting a patient to the floor or some other location, resulting in having to look for him in the event that he is needed. He is never proactive in doing his work but always waits for someone to assign him something to do. Staff, nurses and other techs alike are frustrated with his behavior and joke that we might as well not have a tech assigned to our area at all. Regardless of whether his behavior is completely a result of his disorder, a lack of willingness to attempt to control his behavior/disorder, or whether it's just plain laziness the results are the same. No amount of understanding has made a difference and if someone can't do the job for whatever reason, they shouldn't have that job at all.

A bad employee is a bad employee. ADHD can pose problems, but does not give someone carte blanche at work.

You sound contemptuous of people who have ADHD. Be glad you don't have it and don't have to deal with other's poor opinions of you over something you can't get rid of.

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17,792 Visitors; 1,840 Posts

A bad employee is a bad employee. ADHD can pose problems, but does not give someone carte blanche at work.

You sound contemptuous of people who have ADHD. Be glad you don't have it and don't have to deal with other's poor opinions of you over something you can't get rid of.

There's nothing like having people jump to conclusions.

How do you know I don't have a condition that I can't get rid of and haven't dealt with other's opinions???

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

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Thanks for bestowing this informative article upon us, canigraduate!

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3 Articles; 34,961 Visitors; 2,107 Posts

There's nothing like having people jump to conclusions.

How do you know I don't have a condition that I can't get rid of and haven't dealt with other's opinions???

I don't. I don't know you at all. Rather than getting upset and defensive, perhaps you would like to share?

I only meant that you don't have ADHD. I didn't mean that you haven't had your own share of troubles.

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3 Articles; 34,961 Visitors; 2,107 Posts

Thanks for bestowing this informative article upon us, canigraduate!

You're welcome! I'll post another one, soon.

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pinkiepieRN has 8 years experience and specializes in adult psych, LTC/SNF, child psych.

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I'm finally back on meds and my functioning level at work was the main reason I decided to go back into treatment. I'm on night shift, so there's not as much stimulation and distraction, but I still lose and forget things. It's so frustrating!

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I'm only a student, but I was diagnosed back in May shortly after my second semester ended.

I questioned for a very long time on whether or not it could be a possibility, but without really understanding it, being able to hyperfocus made me think it couldn't be possible. I didn't even know it was a thing. I was uneducated and really thought that someone would be nothing but hyperactive and unable to pay attention.

The other times I wanted to question it and ask, I was scared to ask about it as I thought I'd just be seen as someone trying to get drugs.

After my second semester, I honestly was about to quit. I started thinking about ADHD again and decided to get more information on it before I went and talked to someone about it. It was in that moment that my life started making sense. So many things hit so close to home. Over the next week or so I'd continue reading to see if certain quirks had anything to do it. I found myself laughing and crying at the same time as I started understanding more about myself.

I started treatment, and I truly wish I had asked for help a long time ago. While I certainly still face challenges, I'm able to manage better. My relationship with my husband improved. It's obvious when I don't take meds on any given day. My husband even told me that he prefers me on drugs :laugh: My relationship with classmates have improved. I've always been that shy person just about my entire life which really isolated me from classmates. I'm still shy-ish, but I do have more confidence and have started being able to form better relationships with my classmates. I feel like a "normal" person rather than like the outcast I had felt like most of my life.

I've not been very open about my diagnosis. My husband knows as well as my parents, brother, and sister-in-law, but I haven't really said much to anyone else. School is aware. I spoke with the personal/academic counselor shortly after diagnosis, and she was amazing and really made me feel supported.

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Em CNA2RN has 5+ years experience and specializes in LTC, LTAC, REHAB, MED.ONC.

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Thank you for this article. As a female with inattentive type ADHD (formerly referred too as ADD, dropping the Hyperactivity component of the acronym), I struggled a great deal as a child, especially once it came to middle and senior high school. The amount of organizational skills required to be successful here proved too much for me to assimilate. After my grades dropped to Ds and Fs on a consistent basis, I finally gave up, dropping out of school in the 9th grade.

Now in my final year of nursing school, at 38 years old, I am extremely concerned about how I will ever be a competent nurse. I have struggled almost more in adulthood due to the gross misunderstanding of this affliction. I have been called stupid, lazy, deaf, and a whole host of untrue and extremely discouraging things in my work environment, and throughout my whole life. I believe if there was more accurate comprehension of, and tolerance surrounding this disease, I would not be so apprehensive about taking steps to better myself through a career.

I am not unwilling, and I am extremely intelligent (a high IQ is common in people with ADHD). I simply seem to lack the support of other people who do not understand that I am not ignoring them, trying to get out of doing work, or on another planet. I just sometimes need a little extra patience from others, because, even though a task that needs completed may seem obvious to you, I might not even notice it. Something that you said to me, as clear as day, and I maybe even agreed, might have gone right over my head. But I work hard every day to minimize this, I am in constant consultation with doctors, and am consistent with a daily regimen to reduce the negative effects of ADHD in my day to day life.

It is extremely frustrating to me that I cannot control it entirely, and wreaks havoc on my self esteem that, to others I appear like I "just don't even care" even after all the work i do every day. So please, have patience if you know anyone like me. They may just be a person at work who "annoys you" but you can't even put your finger on what their problem is. Consider that it might actually be a problem for them, and that, as much as it bothers you, it might be ten times worse for them.

I could have written this word for word. It feels great to know I'm not the only one. Sometimes I can't help but wonder if I'm asking too much from others to try to understand how my brain works.

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I was also diagnosed with ADHD in college. After I made it through the first year of nursing school as an average student, I started flunking really bad. I was tested for ADHD as a child so this was no surprise. Adderall saved my life...and my career!

I have my license for a year now and Im working as a home care nurse, but im looking for a hospital job. Do you ever need accommodations at work? The idea worries me.

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3 Articles; 34,961 Visitors; 2,107 Posts

I was also diagnosed with ADHD in college. After I made it through the first year of nursing school as an average student, I started flunking really bad. I was tested for ADHD as a child so this was no surprise. Adderall saved my life...and my career!

I have my license for a year now and Im working as a home care nurse, but im looking for a hospital job. Do you ever need accommodations at work? The idea worries me.

Hi! Sorry for the late reply. I'm working on my BSN and don't come here as often.

I haven't disclosed at work to my management, just to a couple of my coworkers. So far, I haven't needed accommodations.

Just realize, nurses are some of the most judgmental coworkers on the planet. Be careful who you disclose to.

In my experience, until the current societal image of mental health changes for the better, it's best not to tell your employer unless you have an excellent relationship with your manager. If you don't, that manager will use every mistake you make as a disciplinary action and will eventually fire you for cause.

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That sounds pretty tough. I hate this mental health stigma!

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There's no such thing as ADHD. That child is just spoiled.” It frustrates me so much when people use this statement. :angrybird9:

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