About to graduate or new graduates who are waiting to take boards

  1. Hi everyone,

    I am a NP student in CA and will be graduating later this year. Yay. I am really worried about my finances because i don't know what happens after you graduate but are waiting for boards.

    What did you all do during that transition to keep your current living situations?

    Did you take out more loans during the last semester to cover the months you are waiting to get certified?

    Did you find a temp RN job?

    Lend me your wisdom on this highly stressful topic since im fairly independent and have been surviving on loans to get through my program

    Thank you for your time and efforts
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  2. Visit Fnp9090 profile page

    About Fnp9090

    Joined: Feb '18; Posts: 2
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    16 Comments

  3. by   djmatte
    I'd hate to suggest putting yourself into more debt, but if you aren't currently working then that might be the easiest option. I worked as an RN through my NP. So never was without once boards were on my agenda. Nobody in their right mind will hire you as an RN temporarily while you study for your NP boards unless you have the right experience to take some form of travel assignment or per-diem gig.

    Actually if you can do the latter, I would actually suggest this because between landing a NP job and getting credentialed, you could be waiting upwards of months.
  4. by   ms_sgr
    I work PRN in home health.
  5. by   Oldmahubbard
    I was working part-time as an RN throughout school, so I just didn't mention the fact that I was a new NP grad, and I continued working as an RN.

    It was necessary.

    I applied for a job as an RN and just left NP off the resume.
  6. by   djmatte
    Quote from Oldmahubbard
    I was working part-time as an RN throughout school, so I just didn't mention the fact that I was a new NP grad, and I continued working as an RN.

    It was necessary.

    I applied for a job as an RN and just left NP off the resume.
    Or there's that. lol I don't have that good of a poker face
  7. by   Oldmahubbard
    It was quite easy.

    It was only a part-time job, and didn't require much orientation.
  8. by   FullGlass
    Quote from Fnp9090
    Hi everyone,

    I am a NP student in CA and will be graduating later this year. Yay. I am really worried about my finances because i don't know what happens after you graduate but are waiting for boards.

    What did you all do during that transition to keep your current living situations?

    Did you take out more loans during the last semester to cover the months you are waiting to get certified?

    Did you find a temp RN job?

    Lend me your wisdom on this highly stressful topic since im fairly independent and have been surviving on loans to get through my program

    Thank you for your time and efforts
    I'm not sure you can take out loans to cover you after you graduate. I was lucky, as I'm not sure how this happened, but my school refunded me $15,000 right before I graduated. They deliberately held back a bit of the student loans, maybe for this reason.

    If moving in with family is not an option, get any job you can, RN or not, as this will be for a brief period - figure 6 months. If you don't have family, then figure out how you can live very cheaply for a few months. A friend might let you couch surf for awhile and you could rotate among friends.

    Determine how much time you will need to study for the NP license exam and for California, add an additional 3 to 4 months to that to get your CA license. You can start looking for an NP job now, as there are employers who will hire you contingent on you getting your license, but you won't be able to start work until you have the license. I'd figure 6 months from graduation to license, depending on how much time you need to study for the license exam.

    Good luck.
  9. by   db2xs
    Quote from djmatte
    Or there's that. lol I don't have that good of a poker face
    Me neither. I figure the way around that is getting a per diem job, but then that leaves me stranded for health insurance ...
  10. by   Oldmahubbard
    Very odd to me that people are expected to do nothing at all, earn no money, for the possible 6 months or longer required to get an NP job.

    No poker face was needed, whatsoever. I was a licensed RN, in need of immediate income.

    Could be some people don't grasp the realities of the workplace. You cannot be 100% honest about all things, at all times.
  11. by   db2xs
    Quote from Oldmahubbard
    Could be some people don't grasp the realities of the workplace. You cannot be 100% honest about all things, at all times.
    When I'm doing clinicals and therefore can only work certain days of the week, that is difficult to explain. If you have some suggestions for that, that would be great, thanks.

    I understand that telling an occasional white lie sometimes can slide, but when I have to start making up lies to cover up my other lies, then that becomes something else.
    Last edit by db2xs on Feb 24 : Reason: clarification
  12. by   Oldmahubbard
    It was never necessary to invent elaborate lies. The LTC facility was glad to have me, and it didn't require much orientation.

    If you are an RN, it is perfectly legal and ethical to work as one, even if you have a higher degree. Many people do.
  13. by   db2xs
    Quote from Oldmahubbard
    It was never necessary to invent elaborate lies. The LTC facility was glad to have me, and it didn't require much orientation.
    Did they know that you were an NP/were about to graduate?
  14. by   Oldmahubbard
    No, they did not. I would do the exact same thing again, with zero qualms.

    It was not unethical in any way.

    This is an "at-will" state. I can be let go from a job at any time without a reason, or the reason could be trumped up.

    I am also free to leave any job at any time without giving a reason.

    Without employment in that interim, I would have lost my house.

    I took a part time job in the evening in a nursing home. There was large and frequent staff turnover.

    I did not deprive another person of a career they could have had.

    Unlikely it will ever be necessary, but I would absolutely do it again if the need arose.

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