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Speaking at new student orientation

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:uhoh3: my college asked me to speak at a the new student orientation on the 30th. i'm supposed to talk about my experiences when i was a first year nursing student.

i am by no means a public speaker. i stutter, sweat, get all anxious when around a large group of people like that. but, that's a whole other post.

for you first year students-- what type of information did you find helpful? is there anything you wish you would have been told? i need some ideas!

thanks guys!

dani

Ok I am not a freshman (starting senior year) but there are a few things that I would have loved to been told. Maybe how to stay organized, how to stay on top of things, how you should have famiy help at home. Also that is overwhelming and crazy for everyone but as long as you do your work and take things seriously than it will be fine.

Good luck with your speech!

Hey Dani!

I just clicked on your homepage blog. That rocks! So much information you have collected!!! How amazing and wonderful! How did you find time to do that being a student and mommy and all,lol?

You did a great job and I just wanted to tell ya

:uhoh3: my college asked me to speak at a the new student orientation on the 30th. i'm supposed to talk about my experiences when i was a first year nursing student.

i am by no means a public speaker. i stutter, sweat, get all anxious when around a large group of people like that. but, that's a whole other post.

for you first year students-- what type of information did you find helpful? is there anything you wish you would have been told? i need some ideas!

thanks guys!

dani

hi dani, i just checked out your page too, awesome! anyway i am a 1st year and i was trying to think of some questions, but i can't, maybe you should just talk about your experience for a few minutes, and then take questions from the group. usually one persons question is on a lot of peoples minds and your answers in front of the whole group will probably get to more people than one on ones with the 2nd years. that way you will be sure you are answering this particular groups questions, our questions may not apply to the folks you will be speaking to, you know? just a thought!;)

jenn_rn_nj

Specializes in start in NICU 7/14/08.

I think interjecting humor where possible always keeps the audiences attention and if I see that the audience is relaxed and laughing, then it makes me feel relaxed.

Goodluck with your speech!

I think that is an honor. I would like to hear things like

1. Your method of study

2. How you manage your time

3. What worked for you during crunch time

4. Using school resources

5. How to make the most of the program

Good luck

MikeyJ, RN

Specializes in Peds, PICU, Home health, Dialysis.

I am actually speaking at orientation for freshman coming to our university who are interested in nursing (I speak tomorrow). So the students I am speaking to are not in the nursing program yet. I plan to speak a little about the importance of getting high grades in their pre-requisites, the importance of building strong study habits, the importance of having a strong support network, and the importance of learning time management (really going to stress on that one). And then I am just going to answer general questions they may have.

Good luck! :)

Dani: I also think it is a good idea to open up for questions. It will also cause you to relax as if you were talking to a single student instead of a large group. Also, just reassure the students of their fears and worries of the work load, organization, and encourage to get a study group. You will do fine because you are doing something that you love and it will show in your speech!

Kim

arciedee

Specializes in Maternity, quality. Has 2 years experience.

I remember my orientation talk. The guy was telling us how is was going to be so HARD, our lives were OVER for the next two years, very dramatic. I felt like it was setting us up for failure. And quite honestly, there wasn't a darned thing I could do with that information at that point than consider running for the hills. Entirely useless.

My suggestions are:

Don't be condescending. It's easy, as the one "in the know," to do the whole, "I remember when I was in your shoes..." but people are really just looking for info and a friendly face from someone with experience.

Be positive! Make it a pep talk. Give strategies for success, but don't scare your audience. They're scared enough. Tell them that they were accepted because they demonstrated the skills needed for success. Make 'em feel good about themselves.

Encourage class spirit. Encourage collaboration and mutual support. Let them know who to turn to when they need a helping hand.

I bet you'll do great. Good luck!

you guys = awesome! thanks so much for your replies.

not scaring them is sooo important. i was terrified when it came to my orientation. there was an instructor that said, "if you have kids, married, or have a full-time job, you're setting yourself up for failure." she was and still is so darn mean.

i'm making a list of all the recommendations you guys have given me! now, i'm going to have to battle the whole public speaking thing...:barf01:

Testa Rosa, RN

Specializes in Tele Step Down, Oncology, ICU, Med/Surg. Has 6 years experience.

As a mother, it was important for me to hear the following things:

That for those of us who worked hard on our prereqs and did well, nursing school is doable. Yes it's hard, but given that we've already survived some tough classes, and if we keep using and improving on the skills we learned to do well in our prereqs, we will do more than well and still have a family/social/work life.

The heads-up that the biggest change between pre-reqs and nursing classes will be the emphasis away from memorization skills and more towards critical thinking skills. That most of the tests going forward would mimic the NCLEX in format (multiple choice with more than one right answer and that we would need to find the best answer). We were advised to start working off a subject specific NCLEX book (and I actually believe one will be provided for us).

The advice to work in study groups, even for those of us who have flown solo thus far. Advice to also keep on top of the reading, and not to slip behind in any one subject. And, that for many chapters, skim reading would be fine as the professor would have powerpoint handouts of the areas needing slower, more detailed reading.

Advice to those who worked full time this would only be doable in first year, and that by second year the strong recommendation was to work part time only. Although, people have done it and done well in the program.

This was the info I found useful, Good luck!

NBMom1225

Specializes in Surgical/MedSurg/Oncology/Hospice.

The things I would have liked to find out at my orientation were:

-What organization method they found helpful

-How many hours per week they studied, on average

-If they were required to bring all of their textbooks to class

-What type of information we should get a headstart on studying (lab values, fluids and electrolytes, ect)

All I would want to hear is how it CAN be done. Tell them that feeling nervous is normal...Throw a funny story in there....

You're going to do great. I can tell by reading your posts. :) Good Luck and let us know how it goes. :)

I spoke at our new student orientation last week. They always ask some students to talk about time management, but we always end up giving some other tips about nursing school.

I tried to emphasize:

1. Get yourself organized now. It only gets harder as the semesters go on.

2. Do not let yourself get behind. Outside life intervenes and then you're really behind.

3. Do the reading before you go to class.

4. Keep a weekly and monthly calendar.

5. And write done everything and I mean everything that you have to do.

I think what I said and some of the other students said scared them. But some of the best advice was given by another student.

She told them to look around and these are the people you'll be spending the next 3 years of your lives with. And even after we graduate we'll be working together as nurses. How these people will be your best friends and only together you will get through nursing school. Someone usually reminds them your are no longer in competition to get the best grades to get into nursing school.

I've been thinking about that this past week as we started class again. I've been at other colleges (my graduating class for my first degree was smaller than my nursing class), but never have felt this close to my fellow students.

Malia

you are so right! some of my classmates are like my second family. i couldn't do this without them. i'll be sure to encourage to make study buddies!

bekindtokittens

Specializes in Psych..

I'm not sure this is something you can do, but I found it humorous and informative.

The 2nd year students who run our nursing student club spoke to us at our orientation. One of them wore and explained the outfit of "what not to look like at clinicals". Black panties under the white wrinkled scrubs, bright green shoes (we are to wear ALL white), cleavage hanging out, super-long fake nails...you get the picture. It was hilarious and made them more approachable for us noobs.

Tell them to get roller bags. I just weighed my books: 39 pounds!

No wonder I have seen all the nursing students with those bags!

Just keep in mind that they are more intimidated than you are. ;)

danh3190

Specializes in Med-Surg, Cardiac. Has 4 years experience.

I remember my orientation talk. The guy was telling us how is was going to be so HARD, our lives were OVER for the next two years, very dramatic. I felt like it was setting us up for failure. And quite honestly, there wasn't a darned thing I could do with that information at that point than consider running for the hills. Entirely useless.

Reminds me of an honor roll luncheon I was at. The nursing school director asked a graduating student what advice she'd give the students. She said not to let senior students frighten us with stories of how hard it is etc. Best advice I ever heard.

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