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Sick and tired of the AAS BSN debate

ADN/BSN   (30,383 Views | 187 Replies)

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This whole thread begs the question:

If you're sick the debate, why did you bring it up?

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612 Posts; 8,331 Profile Views

Good point, I thought about that too - I think I shouldve went with a title that had more to do with the story..I guess this was the first thing that popped into my head when I decided to share the experience, and look at how well that turned out. LOL Note to self!

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metal_m0nk is a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

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Of course there are always some massively overpriced private programs, many of which do NOT even offer the benefits of the school you mentioned (particularly for-profits). Of course, there are also plenty of public BSN programs that cost less than 33,000 for the final two years (you do the first two at CC).

I went to a CC for my prereqs and paid less than $3000 for my AS degrees (NOT in nursing). I'm attending a private (non-profit) BSN program, but I will be debt free on graduation from a baccalaureate education that will cost me less than $20,000 due to:

1. Grants

2. Scholarships

3. Working during school

4. Saving up before school

So I get irritated when people people say stuff like:

....

In response to someone saying they graduated from BSN programs debt free. I resent the attitude that BSN entry is only for the rich or those who want mountains of debt.

I get what you're saying. If I could interject though, not all schools are equal and there are plenty of nursing students who are facing much steeper challenges in funding their education than you have faced. What you describe is quite doable, however I would wager that there are quite a few more BSN students than not who are either paying exorbitant tuition prices, or who are unable to manage paying a significant portion of their tuition themselves, due to issues with access, location, local economy, additional responsibilities (children, caring for parents or grandparents), etc.

Consider yourself lucky, but do not to make the mistake of assuming that your circumstances are universal and therefore applicable on any grand scale.

Edit: I didn't intend for that to come out all reprimandy...Damn you text!

Edited by metal_m0nk

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SummitRN has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU + Infection Prevention.

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do not to make the mistake of assuming that circumstances universal

Indeed, and that's what I ask of Blackhearted when discussing the topic. :)

There's plenty of people not in debt coming out of BSNs. There's plenty who are. There's plenty in debt and struggling to pay for their ADN programs too.

If you want to look at the real culprits who are putting students in debt, look at the for profit schools whether associate or baccalaureate!

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metal_m0nk is a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

920 Posts; 13,482 Profile Views

Indeed, and that's what I ask of Blackhearted when discussing the topic. :)

There's plenty of people not in debt coming out of BSNs. There's plenty who are. There's plenty in debt and struggling to pay for their ADN programs too.

If you want to look at the real culprits who are putting students in debt, look at the for profit schools whether associate or baccalaureate!

Yeah, those for profit schools are outrageous.

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601 Posts; 10,047 Profile Views

*wine*wine*wine:cheers::cheers::cheers::beer::beer::beer:

It's the famous "Have a drink" time . .

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BrokePHIBroke has 9 years experience and specializes in L&D, ICU, Family Medicine.

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MCC alum here, and GCU alum. Did the ADN program, got a job as an RN, finished the RN-BSN program and had my facility pay for it. Did it change how I practiced patient care? Not really, but it did give me a glimpse into a bigger picture that I didn't see before. It helped me grow as an individual to go through the program, but I still care for my patients in the same compassionate way. To each their own, and you're either a good nurse or you're not. :0)

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45 Posts; 2,676 Profile Views

My DD is going for her AAS.

But about the debate over which degree is better,I was reading many new posts on this forum

and they say that hospitals arent hiring new grads without a BSN.

I guess the nurses with AAS and years of experience are able to still get jobs but the new grads arent without a BSN.

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LPN_2005/RN_10 has 5 years experience and specializes in Cardiac Care, Palliative Care.

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There are some new BSN grads that post here venting that they are unable to get jobs without experience. So, not all BSN new grads are able to obtain employment w/o experience.

My DD is going for her AAS.

But about the debate over which degree is better,I was reading many new posts on this forum

and they say that hospitals arent hiring new grads without a BSN.

I guess the nurses with AAS and years of experience are able to still get jobs but the new grads arent without a BSN.

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368 Posts; 3,855 Profile Views

why would anyone get an associate's degree?

i have a BS (not in nursing) and when i checked into what would be the fastest way to be a RN considering i already spent 4 years in school - i found out getting an associate's or a BSN will take the same amount of time.

the core classes take 2 years and the nursing classes take 2 years. since i have the cores, i'll have to do the 2 years of nursing courses, but it would be 2 years if i chose to go to comm. college and get an associate's or 2 years at the university getting a bachelor's - so why not get a bachelor's?

actually, i'm applying for the accelerated 18 month program, but that just proves the point even more - for someone with a 4 year degree, 18 months is the fastest track.

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jbeck01 specializes in LTC.

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This does not apply to people that ALREADY have a bachelors.

At least at my school, The pre-reqs could be done in 1 year.

ADN has a lot of advantages over a BSN. I decided to get the Associate degree first. The pay is the same, and jobs are still plentiful. I actually highly recommend doing it that way. For a few reasons. Most programs will let you test as an LPN after the first year. You will make more money (than a CNA), AND get nursing experience. A few reasons ADN is advantagious...

- Cheaper.

- Shorter time to complete.

- A lot of employers will pay for you to get your BSN as you are working as an RN.

- If you dont like it, you did not waste as much time or money.

- Same pay. (ADN/BSN)

- LPN experience/resume.

- After your BSN, you will not have to re-take boards.

I definitely agree with everyone that a BSN should be the final goal, but why not work as a nurse (both LPN and RN) while getting it?

Jay

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1,850 Posts; 18,219 Profile Views

This does not apply to people that ALREADY have a bachelors.

At least at my school, The pre-reqs could be done in 1 year.

ADN has a lot of advantages over a BSN. I decided to get the Associate degree first. The pay is the same, and jobs are still plentiful. I actually highly recommend doing it that way. For a few reasons. Most programs will let you test as an LPN after the first year. You will make more money (than a CNA), AND get nursing experience. A few reasons ADN is advantagious...

- Cheaper.

- Shorter time to complete.

- A lot of employers will pay for you to get your BSN as you are working as an RN.

- If you dont like it, you did not waste as much time or money.

- Same pay. (ADN/BSN)

- LPN experience/resume.

- After your BSN, you will not have to re-take boards.

I definitely agree with everyone that a BSN should be the final goal, but why not work as a nurse (both LPN and RN) while getting it?

Jay

This is a good option but doesn't work for everyone.

Nursing is a second career for me and I already had many bills to pay, so I needed to get it done in the shortest amount of time possible, get a job, and make a paycheck.

When I started looking into nursing programs in 2002-2003, community colleges in my area had begun to have long wait lists, but universities did not; you either got in or you didn't, and if you didn't, you just reapplied for the next semester.

I found a university in my area that had a 5 semester program and I discovered that I already had all of their required prereqs done. In the end, I finished my BSN, had a job lined up prior to graduation, and started bringing home a paycheck as an RN about 2 years before I would have if I had gone the ADN route first.

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