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Screwed!!!

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by misha8210 misha8210 (New Member) New Member

misha8210 has 5 years experience and specializes in Postpartum, Mother-baby.

3,258 Visitors; 51 Posts

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Hello everyone!!! I have a couple of questions. Has anyone been in this situation? You cannot fail a nurse course more than once. If you fail twice you are out of the nursing program. Most nursing schools will not transfer those credits and you cannot transfer anyways because you are not in good standing with the program. You are two semesters from graduating from the nursing program. What would you do? Change majors? Apply to other nursing schools?:o

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4,665 Visitors; 528 Posts

Honestly, I might rethink what I was meant to do as a career. But much of that depends on so many different factors. That is just me, though.

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Thedreamer has 4 years experience and specializes in PCU/Hospice/Oncology.

3,762 Visitors; 384 Posts

Misha I am sorry you are in that situation. Perhaps it is time to rethink some of your goals, and come to terms with what is going on in your life at this time. If nursing is what your heart really desires keep applying to other schools, start over, become an LPN, try something. If youre having doubts, maybe its time to rethink your major?

Whatever you decide I hope the best for you in your adventure we call life!

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21,296 Visitors; 6,487 Posts

Did you fail the same part twice, or two different parts? If it's different parts then maybe it's time to rethink your goals. If it was the same course, then what part of it is causing you problems? If you can isolate that, and you really want to be a nurse, reapply at another program and start over, and get tutoring for the part that is a problem. I had a hard time with psych, I just couldn't get it as easily as the other parts of nursing. I didn't fail, but what I'm getting at is I knew what the problem was, and if I had failed I would have known what to work on.

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misha8210 has 5 years experience and specializes in Postpartum, Mother-baby.

3,258 Visitors; 51 Posts

Did you fail the same part twice, or two different parts? If it's different parts then maybe it's time to rethink your goals. If it was the same course, then what part of it is causing you problems? If you can isolate that, and you really want to be a nurse, reapply at another program and start over, and get tutoring for the part that is a problem. I had a hard time with psych, I just couldn't get it as easily as the other parts of nursing. I didn't fail, but what I'm getting at is I knew what the problem was, and if I had failed I would have known what to work on.

It was two different courses. It's funny I try to study more but I ended up not doing that well. I really wanted to be a nurse but maybe God is telling me something different.

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3,178 Visitors; 123 Posts

Sometimes some people just have to work harder at the things they want....maybe it's just a test to see what you really want...if you want to be a nurse, do not give up. Re-apply to your program or maybe see about going to another school. I failed psych nursing and it never once made me consider that I didn't want or couldn't be a nurse...it really made me want it more to prove to myself that I can do it. It may take you some time to pick up from the time you've lost in the program thus far but if you want it.....go get it. Never ever, settle for less than what you want! No matter what it is....If you have it in your mind already (should I try another major) then maybe perhaps nursing isn't really what you want. It takes a strong dedicated person for nursing. If you were thinking that maybe because you feel helpless on what to do then just always remember when one door closes, another one will open! Good Luck in whatever you decide to do!

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Daytonite has 40 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt.

2 Followers; 4 Articles; 100,650 Visitors; 14,602 Posts

stay in the program and work as hard as you can at it. sometimes it just takes some people longer to absorb and understand the information. if the worst happens and you end up out of the nursing program you can always put that learning to use. first, depending on how far you got through the nursing program, i would investigate the possibility of taking the nclex-pn by educational equivalency to get an lpn license. if you can do that, then you'll be able to work as an lpn and get some experience. later on you can try to get your rn through a bridge program at the same school or another school. if that turns out to be an impossibility, then look at other healthcare careers. many have some of the same pre-requisites (anatomy and physiology, at least) that you've already had. see what other healthcare careers your school offers or look at the local community college programs. you can get an idea of some of the different healthcare careers and information about each from this website:

there are basically two categories of healthcare careers: (1) those giving care to patients (requires state licensure), and (2) those that support the healthcare providers (national certification is desired but not mandatory). when my health was going down the tubes and i saw the end of my clinical nursing career looming ahead of me i started investigating other possibilities. there is a whole bunch of business related jobs behind the healthcare givers. depending on the person's level of education they can pay small time to huge salaries. you'll hear some nurses and doctors talk about the facility administrators with some disdain sometimes, but these people are necessary to the running of the healthcare industry. many of the people who are in administrative positions in hospitals are college graduates of programs where they learn these jobs and in many cases also have to take state board exams to be licensed as well. in my case, i went into medical coding because of my previous background in bookkeeping and accounting and have discovered a whole new world beside the patient care units--that of the medical record. and, the field is huge. i'm getting ready to take a national certification exam in hospital coding. with this certification i can work in acute hospitals as a medical coder. at the school i am attending there are programs in nursing, dental hygiene, x-ray technology, health information management and mortuary science (some of the happiest people on the campus--really!). as with nursing, you often won't see these jobs posted in newspapers because of the highly skilled training required. once you graduate from these programs, you have to know where to look for the jobs. but, as you walk around in the hospital sometime, ask yourself how people got the training for some of the jobs they are doing.

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1,842 Visitors; 214 Posts

We were told at orientation last week that you cannot fail a course more than twice. Personally I think it's nice that they will give you more than one shot at it! It's so competitive to get in, you really need to work your butt off and maintain good grades. Do you have a buddy in your class to study with? Have you reached out to the support staff and professors for help in the areas you are failing?

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cute_cabbage2005 has 5 years experience.

1,411 Visitors; 32 Posts

A classmate failed a repeated semester at my school. She was told she had to wait one year to reenroll to repeat the nursing program from the beginning. She didnt want to wait that long so she applied to a different nursing school (with her transferred credits). At the new school she also struggled and had to repeat a semester, but finally graduated. So with perseverance, it can be done.

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misha8210 has 5 years experience and specializes in Postpartum, Mother-baby.

3,258 Visitors; 51 Posts

stay in the program and work as hard as you can at it. sometimes it just takes some people longer to absorb and understand the information. if the worst happens and you end up out of the nursing program you can always put that learning to use. first, depending on how far you got through the nursing program, i would investigate the possibility of taking the nclex-pn by educational equivalency to get an lpn license. if you can do that, then you'll be able to work as an lpn and get some experience. later on you can try to get your rn through a bridge program at the same school or another school. if that turns out to be an impossibility, then look at other healthcare careers. many have some of the same pre-requisites (anatomy and physiology, at least) that you've already had. see what other healthcare careers your school offers or look at the local community college programs. you can get an idea of some of the different healthcare careers and information about each from this website:

there are basically two categories of healthcare careers: (1) those giving care to patients (requires state licensure), and (2) those that support the healthcare providers (national certification is desired but not mandatory). when my health was going down the tubes and i saw the end of my clinical nursing career looming ahead of me i started investigating other possibilities. there is a whole bunch of business related jobs behind the healthcare givers. depending on the person's level of education they can pay small time to huge salaries. you'll hear some nurses and doctors talk about the facility administrators with some disdain sometimes, but these people are necessary to the running of the healthcare industry. many of the people who are in administrative positions in hospitals are college graduates of programs where they learn these jobs and in many cases also have to take state board exams to be licensed as well. in my case, i went into medical coding because of my previous background in bookkeeping and accounting and have discovered a whole new world beside the patient care units--that of the medical record. and, the field is huge. i'm getting ready to take a national certification exam in hospital coding. with this certification i can work in acute hospitals as a medical coder. at the school i am attending there are programs in nursing, dental hygiene, x-ray technology, health information management and mortuary science (some of the happiest people on the campus--really!). as with nursing, you often won't see these jobs posted in newspapers because of the highly skilled training required. once you graduate from these programs, you have to know where to look for the jobs. but, as you walk around in the hospital sometime, ask yourself how people got the training for some of the jobs they are doing.

thank you very much for the link!!!

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misha8210 has 5 years experience and specializes in Postpartum, Mother-baby.

3,258 Visitors; 51 Posts

At least she had a chance to reapply. The nursing school that I attended to does not allow students to reapply to the same program. If you twice, they say, it's time for another major.

A classmate failed a repeated semester at my school. She was told she had to wait one year to reenroll to repeat the nursing program from the beginning. She didnt want to wait that long so she applied to a different nursing school (with her transferred credits). At the new school she also struggled and had to repeat a semester, but finally graduated. So I guess with perseverance, it can be done.

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1,825 Visitors; 84 Posts

I'm sorry you are facing this. It happened to me as well. I don't know what you failed in, but for me it was the clinical experience. My classes are on line, so the class I failed was not one based on black and white test scores, but on my clinical instructor's dislike of me. I don't know if my experience will be of help to you, but I filed a grievance with the dept. head and carried it as far as the dept. chair. My marks were changed, which effectively removed the "failure" from my records, but I was required to go back and repeat the third block again. And all of this was because I had an instructor who let her dislike of me taint how she treated and graded me. Since it was a pass fail situation, and since the clinical class was tied to the critical thinking class, her actions would have caused me to fail both classes had I not fought the action. Hope this helps.

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