Seeing Red

  1. Got a call during my lunch break from one of the other buildings. Actually, two- I missed the first call and then another staff person called me right away. The call was about a boy who had an albuterol neb treatment this morning at school, and now 4 hours later he looks like he needs another one due to his coughing, but the doctor's order states every 6 hours.

    I didn't see the boy this morning- the classroom gave him the AM neb, because in my state pre-k falls under early childhood and so classroom staff have health duties. I told the person on the phone that I hadn't seen how he looked today, but we can't go outside doctor's orders and give meds 2 hours early, so if it looks he's have breathing issues again, mom needs to be called to pick him up early. I also mentioned I'd be heading to that building in the next 15 minutes or so, but that I wouldn't be able to give a neb or really do much else to help, so my presence would NOT be a substitute for calling mom right away.

    I can't even leave my office because 10 minutes later another staff person calls to tell me he doesn't look that bad, just has a weird cough, and so she's not sure why he would need to be sent home. Also, she wants to know why can't we give him medicine early, because the last nurse used to give permission for that? I again explain that we're not allowed to do that, I don't do that, and that again, someone needed to call mom NOW. The person told me she would have someone else do that, but a call would be made.

    Of course I get stuck in traffic on top of the second call and so make it over to the classroom 45, not 15, minutes later. But I figure, hey that's ok, this is why we call parents in the absence of the nurse, so they can be made aware of what's going on and come get their kids and take care of them. Nope! Kid still there, nobody has called, and of course his lungs sound crappy and he looks sick. So guess what happens- I call mom and ask her to pick him up early, which is what I said 50 minutes ago!!

    The kicker is, I'm now super angry that people held me up in the first place by questioning my judgement, and then didn't follow through on what they said what they would do, and all they can do is give crap answers like "I couldn't find so-and-so to make the call and I wasn't going to do it". And when the supervising educator sees me upset about what happened, she gets mad at ME for insisting that she follow up on the matter and speak to the classroom ed staff about what they did or did not do, telling me that I'm talking down to her and telling her how to do her job and manage her staff. Um, this is a health issue, and I have a nursing license to maintain, and you don't, so I'll be darn well upset whenever I please, thank you.

    Am I crazy here? What gives? And is it the weekend yet? UGH.
  2. Visit UrbanHealthRN profile page

    About UrbanHealthRN, BSN, RN

    Joined: Mar '13; Posts: 81; Likes: 333
    RN; from US
    Specialty: 8 year(s) of experience in Pediatric/ Community and Public Health

    5 Comments

  3. by   OldDude
    That's ok to be mad. Any of us would be spitting nails...but the hard reality is that it isn't going to change. You're not in that "club" and you're not going to be and the supervising educator couldn't care less about your nursing license. The only reason you would be crazy is that you would have expectations of responsibility from others who are seldom or never held to that standard.

    Here is an example of the point I'm trying to get across. Here at my school...EVERY DAY, EVERY DAY, EVERY FREAKING DAY, the teachers are reminded to submit their attendance by way of a general announcement and then a personal call to the room if they still don't do it. Every day...every day!!

    So, rage on it for a while, have a few Bud Lights, and let it go for the weekend. It's not worth the space it'll take up in your head.
  4. by   UrbanHealthRN
    Quote from OldDude
    That's ok to be mad. Any of us would be spitting nails...but the hard reality is that it isn't going to change. You're not in that "club" and you're not going to be and the supervising educator couldn't care less about your nursing license. The only reason you would be crazy is that you would have expectations of responsibility from others who are seldom or never held to that standard.

    Here is an example of the point I'm trying to get across. Here at my school...EVERY DAY, EVERY DAY, EVERY FREAKING DAY, the teachers are reminded to submit their attendance by way of a general announcement and then a personal call to the room if they still don't do it. Every day...every day!!

    So, rage on it for a while, have a few Bud Lights, and let it go for the weekend. It's not worth the space it'll take up in your head.
    OldDude, I know that at the end of the day, you're right. Except for the Bud- I prefer regular Budweiser, please, extra calories and all.
  5. by   ruby_jane
    Quote from UrbanHealthRN
    OldDude, I know that at the end of the day, you're right. Except for the Bud- I prefer regular Budweiser, please, extra calories and all.
    Hang in there, sister. Or brother. I can't tell, but hang in there.
  6. by   UrbanHealthRN
    Quote from ruby_jane
    Hang in there, sister. Or brother. I can't tell, but hang in there.
    Thanks Ruby! I am definitely a sister, too.

    I just have to keep reminding myself that school nurses come from a very different background compared to teachers. Also, teachers and school nurses can have different thresholds for what is ok and what is not at their shared workplaces, depending on the issue at hand.

    That's what I love about this site- you all help keep me sane and focused on the bigger picture.
  7. by   OyWithThePoodles
    I agree with OD for the most part. BUT, kids can go downhill fast. I would let them know that if I am not in the building and I say call a parent, CALL THE PARENT. It's okay to let the parent know that the nurse is not in the building, but it isn't acceptable for them to disregard the medical professional telling them to call a parent. I would also let admin know that while you aren't trying to tell him/her how to do their job, you ARE trying to save them from a lawsuit when it comes out that a parent wasn't called 50 minutes prior and the kid is now in the hospital...

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