Any school nurses out there with 40 years?

  1. Would love to hear from the really experienced nurses. I don't remember my contemporaries running to the nurse for every little thing. I mean, mosquito bites, really? Is this a new phenomenon or has it always been this ridiculous?
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    About MrNurse(x2), ADN

    Joined: Sep '15; Posts: 2,231; Likes: 5,322

    19 Comments

  3. by   BeckyESRN
    My husband's grandmother was a school health aid, she retired in 1994! She cannot believe the things that kids come to the nurse's office for now. She said the typical day was under 10 students and this is without other supports, like guidance and psych interns. Head injury (not "I sneezed and hit my head on my desk"!), broken bones (not "My wrist bent like this" while demonstrating and obviously fine), vomiting (not coughing up sputum), severe bloody noses (not "My nose is bleeding" with a single smudge on the tissue). She also CANNOT BELIEVE the crap parents will come pick their child up for or that they expect phone calls about every paper cut or sneeze.

    In my school experience (I'm 31 for reference) I had no idea that we had a school nurse until I passed out in the hallway in 6th grade. I used to check my blood sugar on my own (6th-8th grade) because a thyroid issue caused hypoglycemia. I went home from school sick twice in my 13 years of schooling, once when I passed out and once when I threw up several times. I remember vomiting in 5th grade and my teachers response was "If it happens again, we'll talk to the nurse".
  4. by   ABRN2012
    Well I dont have 40 years but I am with you on the ridiculousness of what comes to see the nurse now. When I was in school for one we didnt have a nurse and two we were made to stay in class unless we literally we fell out of our desk cause we couldnt breathe or threw up everywhere. Teachers now at my schools are too scared of the parents to not send their students for every little thing. Because they know the parents will want Little Johnny to see the nurse for his bug bites. Or how dare they make a child wait a little bit and see if their headache will go away with some rest and water. They need a Tylenol STAT! Their babies should never have you hurt for one second ya know. Insert eye roll!
  5. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Both of you had me . I went once when I stepped on a nail at school in third grade. Got to go home, too. Loved the look on the nurse's face as she took off my shoe. This was the early 70's, way before suing for everything. Oh yeah, and in ninth grade when I got a ball to the groin, I think I just wanted to see her reaction more than anything else.
  6. by   OldDude
    If there was a school nurse when I was going I never met her. But yes, the insignificant complaints are increasing yearly. It's kinda coincidental my 21 year old son, #2, was talking to me yesterday about how "everyone" has a diagnosis of depression; "...geez, anyone who is disappointed, anxious, or worried about something gets a clinical depression diagnosis." This kinda dovetails into the discussion here. I think kids are not being allowed to develop coping mechanisms, and thus, expect some kind of intervention from someone for any occurrence they experience that is perceived to be "negative" to them.
  7. by   moreoreo
    It's a serious problem, and I think the more children who "go to the nurse," the more others think it's a place they can go, too, so that each nonsense visit spawns others. I have had a parent whose child suddenly started coming frequently say, "I think one of her classmates was going to the nurse a lot and that's why this started."

    I think it would help to have specific criteria of when to send students-I think to leave it open ended leaves teachers nervous not to send, even if they think a child is fine-but in my district, at least, management thinks that teachers shouldn't make any health related decisions even if it's something like a papercut. Which I think is so dumb, for lack of a better word! Sometimes the health office just feels like another place to go once a day, like the bathroom. Not sure how we can be expected to handle the emergencies at the same time as every little discomfort that is noted in the entire school.

    (no, I don't have 40 years experience :-) and I myself am still in my 20s, but I never went to the nurse as a child-I didn't know there was one, and I certainly never would have even thought to try to leave school for something like a passing headache. And if my parents had been called at work for my bumping my head on my desk while picking something up they would have been extremely confused. Sometimes it feels like we are liability officers and not nurses!)
    Last edit by moreoreo on Sep 24
  8. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Quote from OldDude
    If there was a school nurse when I was going I never met her. But yes, the insignificant complaints are increasing yearly. It's kinda coincidental my 21 year old son, #2, was talking to me yesterday about how "everyone" has a diagnosis of depression; "...geez, anyone who is disappointed, anxious, or worried about something gets a clinical depression diagnosis." This kinda dovetails into the discussion here. I think kids are not being allowed to develop coping mechanisms, and thus, expect some kind of intervention from someone for any occurrence they experience that is perceived to be "negative" to them.
    Agree 100%. I am in the unique position of not having a counselor. I have so many students coming in with their IPR issues and I tell them like it is. Everyone is in their own Broadway production and everyone else is supporting actors. I also let them know that their "offense" is being pretty selfish. The look on their faces when they realize the truth in it is priceless.
  9. by   aprilmoss
    Only 21 here.
  10. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Quote from aprilmoss
    Only 21 here.
    That may be enough. Would love your insight.
  11. by   MHDNURSE
    I think kids are not being allowed to develop coping mechanisms, and thus, expect some kind of intervention from someone for any occurrence they experience that is perceived to be "negative" to them.[/QUOTE]
    So much this!! I fear for our future with these kids that lack grit, any type of coping mechanisms, self-reliance, you name it. They are doomed. I am trying really hard to help my 12 year-old DS (and 10 year-old DD) not rely on me/us to "fix things" when they go wrong, but instead to try and figure it out on their own, be patient, be persistent, etc. It's really hard. They also want instant gratification.
  12. by   NutmeggeRN
    35 a nurse and 24 in school nursing, I guess that makes me part of the COBS! The biggest change I have seen is the decrease in kids in school on daily meds...most are taking long-acting ADD meds at home. A definite increase in anxity and stress, both of which playout clinincally with head pain, asthma like sx and belly aches. A ridiculous tethering to electronic defices and socal media. Parents inabliity to let them problem solve on their own.

    And I am older, tireder and crankier!!
  13. by   MrNurse(x2)
    My standard question is "would you stop playing with your friends if this happened at home"? Most times I get no response and they just turn out of my door. I don't mind seeing them, but the really do need to grow a spine.
  14. by   MHDNURSE
    Quote from MrNurse(x2)
    My standard question is "would you stop playing with your friends if this happened at home"? Most times I get no response and they just turn out of my door. I don't mind seeing them, but the really do need to grow a spine.
    I'm totally going to use this one! I never doubt something is up when they come to me at recess, but any other time of the day, if it seems like a silly reason to come see me I am asking them this.

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