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RN to BSN program?

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by lily chen lily chen (New) New

My GPA of nursing program is low, which was tough. Are there any BSN programs accept low GPA?

Thanks.

BSNbeDONE, ASN, BSN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, LTACH, LTC, Home Health. Has 35 years experience.

Lots of programs will accept low GPAs if it’s at least a 2.0 to 2.5. However, for anything lower than that (or maybe even at that point), they may either enroll you ‘conditionally’ on a probationary status until you reach their required GPA; and you may/will be required to maintain a specified GPA in order to receive your degree. Without actually having checked into the many programs, I’m going to say that the minimum goal for graduation is a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

If you're outside of any of these ranges, you might want to consider retaking some of your courses to try to bring your grades and average up.

For my MSN program, for those being conditionally admitted with a 2.8, they’ll have to maintain at least a 3.0 for the first two semesters in order to come off probation. If they do not, they are automatically dismissed from the program.

That’s a lot of pressure and undue stress to enter into a program with. If I were you, I’d rather start out in a very good standing by retaking those barely-passed courses. Doing this now will help you later, should you decide to go even further than the BSN.

Hi BSNbeDONE,

Thank you very much for your input. Your input is very helpful.

I will graduate this Summer with my ADN. I'm thinking to get my BSN.

My GPA is between 2.0 to 2.5.

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 29 years experience.

Concentrate on passing the boards and getting your first job. If school was very difficult, don't overload yourself by starting BSN courses immediately at the same time as getting used to being a nurse.

If you're bound and determined to continue right away, you could look at the non-nursing courses that programs you're interested in require and take them as a non-matriculated student. If you do well in those, that will help with your low GPA issue...

Thank you, Jedrnurse.

Your input is very helpful!

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

On 6/2/2020 at 8:05 AM, BSNbeDONE said:

or my MSN program, for those being conditionally admitted with a 2.8, they’ll have to maintain at least a 3.0 for the first two semesters in order to come off probation. If they do not, they are automatically dismissed from the program.

All graduate programs I have been aware of, require a student to get a minimum of a B on all courses. If a grad. student receives 2 course C's they are dismissed. I found I did much better in graduate school because I could immerse myself in the subjects I loved.

Regarding a bachelor's program, you may be challenged for your ability to pass an upper division course (such as a 300 or 400 level course.). Attempting and succeeding in one will give you confidence and demonstrate your ability to handle the course work. A course such as statistics would improve your chances at admission to a not for profit program. A for-profit may take anyone 2.0 or above.

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if it’s at least a 2.0 to 2.5. However, for anything lower than that (or maybe even at that point),

No reputable college will graduate someone with a GPA lower than 2.0.

You may find a cohort where you will be working that are attending a local or online college together. Think of the benefits of networking now that you are on a career path. Fellow nurses can be great for finding out about new jobs. Best wishes on your entry into the profession.

LBC_RN, BSN

Specializes in Mental Health. Has 8 years experience.

Hi! I’m not sure about GPA requirements for their BSN program but I just wanted to put it out there that I recommend Grand Canyon University for their RN to BSN program. I was worried about going back to school & especially online, as I feel that I learn better in a traditional classroom setting. The program was challenging but I felt supported along the way. There are several student resources to help you with assignments & I really feel like they want to see you succeed. I also learned a lot! I’d definitely recommend them. Best of luck! 🙂

BSNbeDONE, ASN, BSN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, LTACH, LTC, Home Health. Has 35 years experience.

37 minutes ago, londonflo said:

All graduate programs I have been aware of, require a student to get a minimum of a B on all courses. If a grad. student receives 2 course C's they are dismissed. I found I did much better in graduate school because I could immerse myself in the subjects I loved.

Fortunately for the OP, there are programs that accept someone in the OP's position aside from what you are aware of.😉

Edited by BSNbeDONE

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

4 minutes ago, BSNbeDONE said:

Fortunately for the OP, there are programs that accept someone in the OP's position aside from what you are aware of.😉

Perhaps I was unclear regarding GPA in Bachelor's versus Master's program. The OP is looking for a BSN program and the question of entry requirements was specific to that course of study. The question was would it be difficult getting into a BSN program. Further I suggested that taking an upper level division course would be beneficial to the student to demonstrate the ability to satisfactorily complete upper division course work. In terms of money, time and interest, that is far better to qualify for upper division work than repeating something that was satisfactorily completed in an associate degree program. Of course YMMV, For-profits and struggling not for profits may admit with any number of conditions. My knowledge comes from sitting on admission committees for all 3 types of programs (diploma, associate and baccalaureate).

You added a comment on MSN programs and I responded to that:

On 6/2/2020 at 8:05 AM, BSNbeDONE said:

For my MSN program, for those being conditionally admitted with a 2.8, they’ll have to maintain at least a 3.0 for the first two semesters in order to come off probation. If they do not, they are automatically dismissed from the program.

You may find the discussion tied to this article interesting. The "B" standard is quite universal in the US Graduate school system.

Quote

BSNbeDONE, ASN, BSN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, LTACH, LTC, Home Health. Has 35 years experience.

2 minutes ago, londonflo said:

Perhaps I was unclear regarding GPA in Bachelor's versus Master's program. The OP is looking for a BSN program and the question of entry requirements was specific to that course of study. The question was would it be difficult getting into a BSN program. Further I suggested that taking an upper level division course would be beneficial to the student to demonstrate the ability to satisfactorily complete upper division course work. In terms of money, time and interest, that is far better to qualify for upper division work than repeating something that was satisfactorily completed in an associate degree program. Of course YMMV, For-profits and struggling not for profits may admit with any number of conditions. My knowledge comes from sitting on admission committees for all 3 types of programs (diploma, associate and baccalaureate).

You added a comment on MSN programs and I responded to that:

You may find the discussion tied to this article interesting. The "B" standard is quite universal in the US Graduate school system.

There are those institutions that will accept a student on "conditional/probationary status" with the condition that they achieve the recommended/required GPA in a specified time period. That is what I said in my initial response to the OP. Did you miss that? WGU is one that will accept the OP into a BSN and graduate program regardless of the GPA. Check it out some time..

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

21 minutes ago, BSNbeDONE said:

WGU is one that will accept the OP into a BSN and graduate program regardless of the GPA. Check it out some time..

It sounds like you are familiar with WGU and therefore know more than me. WGU does require graduation from an associate or diploma school of nursing as requirement for entry. A 2.0 is the minimum GPA necessary to maintain good standing and graduate from a degree specific program. Also financial aid is tied to at least a minimum GPA. Some career colleges may accept a lower GPA but that is not the type of program I am talking about here.

There are quite a few educational models available for nursing study. I was an evaluator for the Excelsior program 30 years ago when it was the University of the State of New York. A very different focus on learning and evaluation and extremely interesting as all educational models are.

WGU does not have a grade-centric focus and has designed a curriculum that dove-tails with that philosophy. I have known several graduates that enjoy the WGU program for its structure and cost. I am glad there are alternatives available for nursing students and glad of articulation agreements to assist students achieve formal education., If anything I have said is incorrect, I would appreciate knowing. Thank you.

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

5 minutes ago, londonflo said:

Yes I am familiar with non-traditional nursing programs. It sounds like you are familiar with WGU and therefore know more than me. WGU does require graduation from an associate or diploma school of nursing as requirement for entry. A 2.0 is the minimum GPA necessary to maintain good standing and graduate from a degree specific program. Also financial aid is tied to at least a minimum GPA. Some career colleges may accept a lower GPA but that is not the type of program I am talking about here.

There are quite a few educational models available for nursing study. I was an evaluator for the Excelsior program 30 years ago when it was the University of the State of New York. A very different focus on learning and evaluation and extremely interesting as all educational models are.

WGU does not have a grade-centric focus and has designed a curriculum that dove-tails with that philosophy. I have known several graduates that enjoy the WGU program for its structure and cost. I am glad there are alternatives available for nursing students and glad of articulation agreements to assist students achieve formal education., If anything I have said is incorrect, I would appreciate knowing. Thank you.

BSNbeDONE, ASN, BSN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, LTACH, LTC, Home Health. Has 35 years experience.

Here’s another one: https://www.capella.edu/content/dam/capella/PDF/policies/2.01.01.pdf

I’ve never attended WGU, but I have heard about their program. I received my ASN and BSN through Excelsior. I’ve just started the MSN through Capella. But they do accept a 2.0 entry into their RN-BSN program, and a 2.8 (conditionally) for the MSN. I’ve never disputed or debated a 3.0 maintenance or graduation requirement.

Edited by BSNbeDONE

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

FWIW I have always found graduate students to have high achievement goals and to meet them head on. Congratulations on your admission to Capella. I am sure you will love graduate school.

Bbkitty09, BSN, RN

Has 3 years experience.

I would also look into electives like sociology or religion that could be used to boost your GPA and our prerequisites for some BSN programs.  They are also cheaper to take in my state at a technical school/community college than a 4 year university.  Don't get discouraged.  My BSN programs were a lot of papers.  Myself and classmates that our BSN was easier than our ADN.