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fayethlove fayethlove (New Member)

Rehire Eligiblity after leaving the wrong way

Nurses   (2,291 Views 9 Comments)
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Ok, so I used to work for a local hospital as a per-diem health unit coordinator in 2007. At the time my son was around 1 year old and he was having terrible asthma attacks and being sick a lot, I ended up missing a lot of nights while working there. I ended up quitting without notice because the nurse manager had told me earlier that week if I missed one more shift she would have to let me go....that friday my son was sick so I just quit. She wasn't very understanding or wanted to work with me (not that she had to anyway).

Now, my son is almost 5 and he is healthy. I recently took classes for ekg tech and cardiac monitoring tech, so I applied for a position as a cardiology tech in the cardiac surveillance unit and I was called for a interview last week. My interview is April 14th.

How should I handle my previous employment situation during the interview and am I even eligible for rehire??

I don't think my resume would have been forwarded to the hiring manager if I wasn't eligible for rehire, but I could be wrong.

I'm puzzled.

Thanks for you help!!!!:)

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It's up to them if you are eligible for rehire. Just because they gave someone your resume doesn't mean you are. They may let that person decide.

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Check with human resources dept. personally. There probably are policies specific to rehire eligibilty, and human resources will be able to inform you about your hiring status.

Good luck :) and glad your son is doing better

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I wouldn't bring it up unless asked. Then just pretty much say what you told us. Life happens.

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I'm assuming that you listed your previous job on the current job application, thus I would agree with a previous poster who advised not to bring the situation up unless the HR person does. If so, explain the circumstances as you did in your post. I would be prepared for it to come up at the interview, but try not to stress about it. All you can do is explain what was going on in your life at that time, and how things have changed since then. Best of luck to you.

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For future reference, you should have had FMLA paperwork in place and then each time you needed to take off due to your son's illness, it would have been covered.

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For future reference, you should have had FMLA paperwork in place and then each time you needed to take off due to your son's illness, it would have been covered.

Just know, that you have to be employed for a year before your eligible for FMLA.

You may consider a call to the manager whom I'm sure is still not over that area to ask for a rehire status,,,, but as with the excellent advice you've been given, HR is the place to start.

We've all burned a bridge... some are not worth crossing a second time, if it doesn't pan out, remember that.

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Just know, that you have to be employed for a year before your eligible for FMLA.

You may consider a call to the manager whom I'm sure is still not over that area to ask for a rehire status,,,, but as with the excellent advice you've been given, HR is the place to start.

We've all burned a bridge... some are not worth crossing a second time, if it doesn't pan out, remember that.

Actually, you have to have been employed for a year and have worked at least 1250 hours during that time (> .60 FTE), so FMLA provisions often don't apply to part-time and prn people (like the OP).

On the other hand, prn people are sometimes not held to the same standards re: resignations and notice as full-time, regular employees, so that may work in the OP's favor. :)

To the OP, I would just proceed with the interview process -- don't volunteer any information about the previous situation, but answer any questions asked about it honestly and completely without sounding defensive or bad-mouthing your previous boss. Best wishes! :balloons:

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Actually, you have to have been employed for a year and have worked at least 1250 hours during that time (> .60 FTE), so FMLA provisions often don't apply to part-time and prn people (like the OP).

On the other hand, prn people are sometimes not held to the same standards re: resignations and notice as full-time, regular employees, so that may work in the OP's favor. :)

To the OP, I would just proceed with the interview process -- don't volunteer any information about the previous situation, but answer any questions asked about it honestly and completely without sounding defensive or bad-mouthing your previous boss. Best wishes! :balloons:

You are right....prn employees aren't held to the same standards as permanent employees...I wasn't entitled to fmla. I think being a per diem employee could possibly work in my favor...we will see.

I'm going to be completely honest and just go, hell what do I have to lose. The only thing they can say is no. I'll be in the same place I am now. Nothing to lose by going!

Thanks for the great advice. I feel better!!!!:lol2:

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