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3 Reasons Why Nursing Schools are Turning Away Candidates During a Nursing Shortage

Nurses Article   (28,869 Views | 89 Replies | 1,063 Words)

Melissa Mills has 20 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Nurse Case Manager, Professor, Freelance Writer.

11 Followers; 123 Articles; 26,455 Profile Views; 286 Posts

Did you know that over 56,000 qualified nursing school applicants were turned away in 2017? This number is shocking by itself but added to the fact that we are in the midst of a nursing shortage, makes it downright confusing. Learn why this is happening at nursing schools across the country. You are reading page 8 of 3 Reasons Why Nursing Schools are Turning Away Candidates During a Nursing Shortage. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Melissa Mills has 20 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Nurse Case Manager, Professor, Freelance Writer.

11 Followers; 123 Articles; 286 Posts; 26,455 Profile Views

There has been a nursing shortage for at least 30 years; as that was the situation in 1987 when I went to work and is still the situation now. In the southeast wages are lower than many other parts of the country; the main problem is wages. Most look at nursing and the risks/hazards in that career field and ask why would I become a nurse. They think with 4 years of education (other than nursing) there would be less risk and higher wages

Hi Wolfbuddy! You raise some excellent points about the nursing shortage and the motivations of those entering the profession. The wages have increased over the last 20 years, or so, however, I agree that there are other professions that you can come out of college making significantly more money. The nursing shortage is a complex issue with many moving pieces. I'm not sure there will ever be a real solution. Instead, we have to attempt to solve the problems as they arise and see how the whole thing turns out.

Thanks so much for your insightful comments.

Melissa

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

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I am not sure why the author used a secondary source (Beckers via CNN via AACN) to cite for the article, but most of the data mentioned comes direct from the AACN and is located here: Nursing Shortage.

The primary BLS data is here: Registered Nurses : Occupational Outlook Handbook: : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and here Registered Nurses.

There are a few difficult issues being discussed here, and some of them are rather hotly debated.

I am not sure most people would debate there is a dearth of qualified nursing faculty and this is magnified by the fact that nursing programs are lucrative business for colleges and universities at a time when demand for nursing spots is peaking. At the same time there is quite a bit of attrition, over 10% a year, most to non-academic nursing jobs. There is also significant retirement attrition as nursing faculty is aging. The market hasn't fully corrected to this and while faculty pay has increased in the past decade it doesn't seem to match demand nor clinical wages especially as faculty are expected to have terminal degrees.

Clinical education, which lies partly out of academia control, is a difficult bottleneck as nursing is changed with more acuity and higher ratios making less room for clinical education. I wasn't around for the days of resident nursing education but perhaps that model will come back into favor as hospitals look to cut non-billable costs.

Last but not least, the nursing shortage debate. There is absolutely a purveyed and perceived nursing shortage that is supported by data from the BLS based on predictions. The data from the AACN tells me nothing more than there is a high demand for nursing students, it doesn't say anything about a demand for nurses. There is also some reasonable counters to the BLS predictions: nursing wages have remained relatively stagnant in the face of a "shortage" and the number of underemployed nurses has been reported as high as 20-25% even though unemployment is low at 2-3% for RNs. There are lots of employers posting jobs they don't intend to fill seems to be the word on the street.

My two cents.

The sourses provided do not count the number of available RNs and compare them to the number RNs needed.

In my BSN program we did exactly that for the state of Wisconsin. We found that there were plenty of nurses available, but that a lot of them choose to work in other fields due to the pay, benifits and working conditions being offered in Wisconsin's hospitals and nursing homes.

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

5,144 Posts; 69,444 Profile Views

A shortage of nurses willing to accept the stagnant pay, poor benifits, and unsafe working conditions being offered in NO WAY indicates a shortage of nurses

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Katillac has 18 years experience as a RN.

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Hi there Katillac - Thanks so much for your comments. If you follow the links in the OP, you can see that I have used various articles as evidence that students are being turned away. I agree that graduating more students is not likely not going to solve anything. The issues related to nursing shortages and other staffing issues go far deeper than one area, like education. However, I think it is imperative that we learn more about the issues, form our own opinions, and decide how best to act to make a postiive impact for our healthcare industry and the future of nursing.

Thanks again for your thoughts. ~Melissa

Melissa,

I didn't and don't question nursing students are being turned away from nursing schools. I question what seemed to be your premise, that students being turned away has a causative relationship to a general nursing shortage perceived by some. I'm glad you agree graduating more nurses won't solve anything. Odd that your article - from title forward - suggested you think otherwise.

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hannahgb has 46 years experience and specializes in retire-numerous.

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Yes--there is a nursing shortages of nurses who WANT to take care of patients--all the ins and outs of their care--and on a General Floor--Nurses who are in it for the hours that they work--willing to work and know that you will work week ends-holidays-kids birthdays and programs-and various shifts--the last several years, before I retired, I saw the new grads on their way out to a 9 to 5 job, no weekends, no holidays and "hospital work" was just a stepping stone--I feel for us older generation who will have "who" to care for us.

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3 hours ago, hannahgb said:

I saw the new grads on their way out to a 9 to 5 job, no weekends, no holidays and "hospital work" was just a stepping stone--I feel for us older generation who will have "who" to care for us.

Yes, oddly it did not seem to be that way so much before the advent of behemoth healthcare corporations and so-called professionals being treated like consumables.

I feel for you and the situation you describe, too, but your ire is misdirected.

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