5 Reasons Why Being A Pediatric Nurse Is Like Being A Disney Character

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When caring for the pediatric population, we have the opportunity to be creative as we try to ease the minds of our patients and their family members. In this article, learn how as a pediatric nurse you are able to bring the awe, wonder and joy of Disney to the bedside. Do you have a favorite Disney character to channel when you are at work?

Specializes in Emergency Department.

5 Reasons Why Being A Pediatric Nurse Is Like Being A Disney Character

Pediatric nursing is not an easy task by any stretch of the imagination. Every day we go to work; it is to help children who need care for a vast range of medical illnesses. Their illnesses vary in severity, but no matter how ill the child might be, I can guarantee you they are scared. I also can guarantee you their parents are nervous as well. Their child is probably going through tests and procedures that are not comfortable, causing them pain and the results of those tests have the potential to cause pain to the family as well. As a pediatric nurse, I try my best every day to channel my inner Disney character and bring the magic of Disney to the bedside. In hopes of creating a magical, creative and joyful experience for everyone involved.

Below is a list of the 5 reasons why being a pediatric nurse is like being a Disney Character:

1. You get to, literally, save the day.

No fear, your nurse is here! Everyone needs a hero, someone to look up to, to be the example and a positive influence in their life. For children, that hero could be you. As a nurse, you are the one that is spending hours at their bedside caring for them. This time is priceless and every second you are there, you are being a role model to them and in a sense their own personal hero! Who knows, maybe one day, they might become a nurse like you to be a hero for other children.

2. You get to bring pure joy to children.

Words cannot describe how as nurses we have the ability to bring pure joy to a child's face. Whether it is by a game of peek-a-boo, putting in a "direct call to Doc McStuffins ", playing with Legos or a game of war, you are able to see the joy beaming from their faces.

3. You get to protect the children from evil.

The hospital can be a scary place for any child. In their minds, evil or scary things could be lurking around any corner in this unfamiliar place. At the bedside, nurses have the ability to explain to their pediatric patients what is going on, why, and in a way that they will understand. You will leave the light on, read them a story and check under the bed to ensure no monsters are hiding. Evil no more! As there personal protector is here!

4. You can sing and dance your heart out!

No matter how good or bad either of you are, it is always entertaining and that is the key. As adults, we are restricted to always act a certain way, walk the fine line and at times are criticized for having fun or acting "like a child". I agree that no matter where you work there is a certain level of professionalism you must have, but in the world of pediatrics, you have a ton more wiggle room.

5. You get to teach the children life lessons.

All of the Disney shows and movies have some key take-home messages or themes intertwined into them. As a pediatric nurse, you have the same opportunity for a lesson to be learned and for change to occur. In my opinion, any opportunity to share or teach a lesson to a child about their health is priceless.

Most importantly, as an adult, you get to be creative and feel the magic of Disney as well. As adults, at times we can lose sight of the bigger picture and forget what is REALLY important. I believe an important part of being an adult is having the opportunity to act like a child. Without a worry in the world, just having a good time and some good old laughs. As much as we teach the children, they teach us more if we are aware and willing to learn.

Who knows, Woody and Buzz are pals, Sully has Mike and Lelo has Stitch. Maybe Doc McStuffins needs a friend who is a nurse too?

Michael M. Heuninckx RN-BSN

If you like this article then you might want to check out Michael's new book for nurses...

Code Blue! Now What? Learn What To Do When Your Patients Need You The Most!

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11 Comment(s)

MissKrys87

47 Posts

As a new nursing student who has always wanted to be within the ED or Peds after graduating, I personally loved this post. Gave me something to consider about my future path in Nursing! Thank you so much for sharing this post! I loved it.

:)

- Krys

Krystal C. 💉💕

GuEsT78

111 Posts

Great ideas, but Disney has no relationship to your good points and could be removed. The real corporate Disney has little to do with the Disney of your imagination.

The primary reason I say that are the company's draconian non-disclosure agreements and what must undoubtedly be the reason for them. I know someone who worked for Disney. He/she told me in strict confidence about the terrifying non-disclosure agreements employees are forced to sign. Talk about what the company does not want you to talk about and your life will become a lawyer-filled hell. That's not openness and accountability.

What is Disney so intent on covering up? Incidents involve child molesters operating at its theme parks, particularly those employed as Disney characters. You talk about Woody and Buzz being "pals." The real Woody and Buzz may be teamed up as molesters, covering for one another.

Fortunately, Disney can't prevent law enforcement from acting. Google "Disney child molestation" if you want some stomach-churning examples that indicate that the company has, at best, a mixed record dealing with the problem. Here's a sample from the Huffington Post:

35 Disney Employees Arrested On Child Sex Charges In Less Than 10 Years

It is never a good idea to teach children to trust the real-life people who play Disney characters. Pedophiles have a perverse attraction to work that gives them power over children.

adventure_rn, BSN

Specializes in NICU, PICU. 1 Article; 1,515 Posts

Aww, this made me smile. During my peds heme/onc rotation, I remember showing up for clinical and seeing Tinkerbell, Elsa, and Jasmine walking down the hall. They turned out to be nurses in some incredibly realistic costumes (almost Disney quality), going to surprise a long-term patient for her birthday.

So glad we have passionate peds nurses to keep the magic alive!!

Netriss, BSN, RN

Has 2 years experience. 53 Posts

This post really made me smile! As a new nursing student I want to work in pediatrics or labor and delivery once I graduate, this really has gotten me excited for when I get ready to do my peds rotation in a few months.

BeachsideRN, ASN

Specializes in NICU, Trauma, Oncology. Has 8 years experience. 1,722 Posts

I wish I could like this post a million times. Peds is my passion.

~PedsRN~, BSN, RN

Specializes in Acute Care Pediatrics. Has 4 years experience. 826 Posts

I had mixed emotions about this article, as an inpatient acute care pediatric nurse.

First of all - pediatrics is about so much more than glitter and laughs, boo boos and monsters under the bed. Any peds RN knows that after about age 7, all of that goes out the window these days n matter what. And No amount of colorful bandaids, prizes from the treasure box (which in reality is donated junk, mostly from McDonalds Happy Meals), or stickers is going to make that 4 year old you just held down for their third blood culture in three days look at you like a super hero. No matter how hard you try.

I think a lot of people go into pediatrics thinking that it's colorful scrubs and sing songy assessments, and that's just not truthful or realistic. Sure, my job is definitely more whimsical than an adult med/surg floor. I get to do fun stuff like sneak kids to the playroom after hours because they just need to get "out", smuggle in their favorite treat because I know they are tired of hospital food, or sit down a do a puzzle with a teenager who isn't allowed anything else in their room because they still have fresh bandages on their wrists where they tried to kill themselves. I believe "nursing presence" means more in pediatrics than in any other specialty.

The truth is, working in a busy Children's hospital (we have over 300 beds) - is nothing like being a Disney character. I think this predisposed notion that pediatrics is somehow cuter and sweeter than the rest of the medical world is a dangerous one, and I have seen the toll that this idea takes when the new grads start on my floor. You aren't playing games with the 2 year old drowning victim, who now has little to no brain activity left. What you are doing is trying to figure out what to say to that mom and dad who keep asking you how long until little Johnny wakes up, or how they can't wait for him to get back to daycare because his friends miss playing with him. I see these new nurses come in, their pockets stuffed with stickers and their scrubs covered with Olaf and Tinkerbell - and I watch them because dark and sad because it's not the happy place they thought it was.

Don't get me wrong. We have lots of happy. Like I said in another post - so many of my patients eventually get better and go home. But it's not about channeling my inner Disney. It's about being a great nurse, taking care of them, and being there for their parents. My job has very little time for Disney.

:)

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 12 years experience. 1 Article; 13,949 Posts

I think pediatric nurses are more like super heroes (the human ones--spider man, BatMan, captain America) we can save the day but sometimes are forced to choose the lesser of two evils. We have our faults but our instincts and experiences can end the day in victory.

I had a challenging client today.Crap numbers but my instinct/spidey senses said assess, neb treatment, CPT reposition and get ready with suction. It worked. Kept my calm and cool, even with all the bells & whistles going off mom reacted to my calm & professionalism. I trusted my skill, instinct, intuition, and a thorough standing order set and all was well. We both live to fight the evils of chronic complex medical conditions another day. My cape hung up until tomorrow

Edited by JustBeachyNurse

ShantheRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatric Hem/Onc. Has 4 years experience. 646 Posts

I had mixed emotions about this article, as an inpatient acute care pediatric nurse.

First of all - pediatrics is about so much more than glitter and laughs, boo boos and monsters under the bed. Any peds RN knows that after about age 7, all of that goes out the window these days n matter what. And No amount of colorful bandaids, prizes from the treasure box (which in reality is donated junk, mostly from McDonalds Happy Meals), or stickers is going to make that 4 year old you just held down for their third blood culture in three days look at you like a super hero. No matter how hard you try.

I think a lot of people go into pediatrics thinking that it's colorful scrubs and sing songy assessments, and that's just not truthful or realistic. Sure, my job is definitely more whimsical than an adult med/surg floor. I get to do fun stuff like sneak kids to the playroom after hours because they just need to get "out", smuggle in their favorite treat because I know they are tired of hospital food, or sit down a do a puzzle with a teenager who isn't allowed anything else in their room because they still have fresh bandages on their wrists where they tried to kill themselves. I believe "nursing presence" means more in pediatrics than in any other specialty.

The truth is, working in a busy Children's hospital (we have over 300 beds) - is nothing like being a Disney character. I think this predisposed notion that pediatrics is somehow cuter and sweeter than the rest of the medical world is a dangerous one, and I have seen the toll that this idea takes when the new grads start on my floor. You aren't playing games with the 2 year old drowning victim, who now has little to no brain activity left. What you are doing is trying to figure out what to say to that mom and dad who keep asking you how long until little Johnny wakes up, or how they can't wait for him to get back to daycare because his friends miss playing with him. I see these new nurses come in, their pockets stuffed with stickers and their scrubs covered with Olaf and Tinkerbell - and I watch them because dark and sad because it's not the happy place they thought it was.

Don't get me wrong. We have lots of happy. Like I said in another post - so many of my patients eventually get better and go home. But it's not about channeling my inner Disney. It's about being a great nurse, taking care of them, and being there for their parents. My job has very little time for Disney.

:)

This.....so much. I was about to write a long wordy reply, but you nailed it perfectly! A lot of my patients don't get better, and I get to help them - and their families - through the death process. Disney doesn't really cover that. That being said, I have had a few dance offs and sing alongs while doing sterile procedures :) There is some joy to balance out the sad!

guest798886

146 Posts

And the world's greatest article goes out to this guy :roflmao: