"Hallway admissions" at overcrowded ED, and professional risks of RNs talking to press

Posted
by klone klone, MSN, RN Member Nurse

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 16 years experience.

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Guest219794

Guest219794

2,453 Posts

Correct. A huge portion of patients at Montefiore (and at any other hospital in the Bronx) are on some form of Medicaid. It's a general overcrowding issue, not a private vs. public insurance issue.

My sister called me in a panic when my aunt was boarded in an ER close to Montefiore. She described the place as looking like a "war zone". I got her to take a picture of the monitor and beeping pump. When I saw that the amiodarone was not running, I told her that it would be OK to use the call bell regardless of how busy the nurses are.

When I got down there after she was admitted, I found her NGT hooked to high continuous suction, and a foley in place despite her being mobile for two days. Thank god the family fought the planned discharge- she had a fever and UTI by the next day, and would have probably been uroseptic and back in the war zone ER a couple days later.

If she ends up in that ER again, I would be tempted to load her in a car AMA, and keep driving until the average price of a parked car is over $40,000, then find the closest ER.

It is shocking the difference in care people are subject to based solely on location.

10 miles from Montefiore is Scarsdale, with an average household income of $250,000. Not sure what hospital those folks use, but I doubt they are boarded in the halls with a 15-1 ratio.

TriciaJ, RN

Specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory. Has 41 years experience. 4,295 Posts

I think there are definitely less risky ways to go about whistleblowing or effecting change that would protect one's job. Unless of course that particular nurse didn't care about the repercussions of being quoted by name in the press, and had reached her personal "**** it" point, which I totally get.

Yes. 15 patients per nurse; some in the hallway. I'd probably sing like a canary on my way out and look for a nice job selling shoes someplace.

CCU BSN RN

CCU BSN RN

Specializes in CICU, Telemetry. Has 7 years experience. 280 Posts

Both hospitals I've worked at have had us sign papers on hire saying we won't ever speak to the press about our jobs/speak as an employee of the hospital without consulting the hospital's PR department. I'm pretty sure I could be fired for doing this. I probably wouldn't, but the hospital would have the right to fire me, given my understanding of the terms of the documents I've signed.

Do all hospitals not have these forms? Seemed pretty standard but I guess I've only worked in 2 hospitals.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 16 years experience. 14,360 Posts

I've never signed anything, but the one time the local newspaper interviewed me for an initiative our department was doing, I had to get it cleared and our PR person had to be there for the interview.

canoehead, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 30 years experience. 6,837 Posts

Both hospitals I've worked at have had us sign papers on hire saying we won't ever speak to the press about our jobs/speak as an employee of the hospital without consulting the hospital's PR department. I'm pretty sure I could be fired for doing this. I probably wouldn't, but the hospital would have the right to fire me, given my understanding of the terms of the documents I've signed.

Do all hospitals not have these forms? Seemed pretty standard but I guess I've only worked in 2 hospitals.

We don't have those forms but we would still be fired for speaking out based on the hospital's social media and confidentiality policies.

/username, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. 526 Posts

It's not in the best part of the bronx, but if they think they have bad staffing problems, someone should take a look at the HHC hospitals......

As an aside, isn't it nice that that website has two different "channels" for hospital executives, but none for nursing?

cec0007

cec0007

Has 1 years experience. 27 Posts

Many years ago I worked at the only hospital in our county. A few times our occupancy would get so high that patients were admitted to what were normally waiting rooms, hospital floor hall areas (screened off), large storage areas, etc. To their credit, they did not leave these patients in the ED any longer than necessary to find a corner for them somewhere on one of the in-patient floors.

That was long ago, and I later changed careers. I'm not even sure that would be allowed now, but we did it several times while I was there although it was very rare. Even with patients seemingly hanging from the walls, we never reached our "official" patient capacity max. I can't imagine where we'd have put patients if we'd ever reached that number.

Axgrinder

Specializes in Adult MICU/SICU. 256 Posts

Love your avatar pic! That seems to be 99.9% of the people I personally know.