PSA

Posted

I am so frustrated with my coworkers right now. Here’s a wild idea: if you have a problem with something I’m doing, please come to me and I’ll be happy to fix it. I’m still new (less than a year) to this job, so I realize I don’t know everything and am happy to learn and take feedback. DO NOT roll your eyes at me and take a deep breath, and never tell me what I did wrong but then go behind my back to tell management about it. Rude! Anyone else deal with this? 

JBMmom, MSN, NP

Specializes in Long term care; med-surg; critical care. Has 10 years experience. 4 Articles; 1,931 Posts

Not everyone is mature enough to handle things directly. Right now people are also dealing with frustrations at an all time high, so people that might normally take a productive and supportive stance might just be exhausted. And people are just people with different personalities everywhere. Sorry you're dealing with this, if you know anyone specifically that has spoken with your management, are you able to approach them to deal with it? 

If someone is visibly rude like rolling eyes and signing, I will call them out in the moment and ask what it is they would like to say. Good luck!

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 15years medical. Has 43 years experience. 1 Article; 9,481 Posts

At my last routine checkup in October, my PSA came back within parameters.

Which I want to keep an eye on, since my older brother died of prostate cancer.

Although I don't know how useful a PSA is in detecting prostate cancer. My previous PMD told me that he'd had seen normal PSA levels on his patients with full blown prostate cancer and high levels on patients who did not have cancer.

I think the PSA is best used as a marker- a point of reference.

JKL33

6,088 Posts

On 1/12/2022 at 5:22 PM, missnursingstudent19 said:

Anyone else deal with this? 

Personal preference: Ignore. If they are rolling their eyes and huffing and puffing they're just dying to have you acknowledge the behavior so they can have their chance to air their grievances handed right to them on a silver platter.

I choose not to participate.

Since emotional energy is not in limitless supply, not wise to waste any on such immature situations.

macawake, MSN

Has 14 years experience. 2,079 Posts

On 1/12/2022 at 11:22 PM, missnursingstudent19 said:

I am so frustrated with my coworkers right now. Here’s a wild idea: if you have a problem with something I’m doing, please come to me and I’ll be happy to fix it. I’m still new (less than a year) to this job, so I realize I don’t know everything and am happy to learn and take feedback. DO NOT roll your eyes at me and take a deep breath, and never tell me what I did wrong but then go behind my back to tell management about it. Rude! Anyone else deal with this? 

Some people are just like that. Instead of just speaking their minds, they engage in passive-aggressive nonsense. It happened to me once when I was a new nurse. I mean a really new nurse, about a weeks experience in total. I was handing off to the oncoming nurse and was really afraid that I’d forget some important detail. I probably prattled on for way too long. (Not probably. I did). Any way.. she was rolling her eyes at me like she was having some sort of seizure and had simultaneously overdosed on some party drug AND a failed botox injection.. I looked at her and said ”Awww, are your contacts bothering you? The hospital air is sooo dry, it’s a pain isn’t it?” She never rolled her eyes at me again. (And I learned to give more concise and better reports 😂)

These days, depending on my mood I will either just ignore people like that or ask them if there is something on their mind that they wish to share.

Don’t let them get to you OP.
 

Best wishes!

JKL33

6,088 Posts

5 hours ago, macawake said:

she was rolling her eyes at me like she was having some sort of seizure and had simultaneously overdosed on some party drug AND a failed botox injection..

🤣

mtmkjr, BSN

321 Posts

I have learned that many people are addicted to gossip. They're looking for a "quick fix" and reporting something to management can feed that need with even more satisfaction than talking behind your back to coworkers. 

Gossip is self-serving. It gives a sense of power and is emotionally rewarding. If your coworker was truly concerned about an aspect of patient care,  he would have grabbed the teaching moment, especially with a new nurse.  Instead, by running to management he avoided personal responsibility and the effort of drawing on interpersonal relationship building skills which he probably lacks.

The only thing I would advise is to be aware of these tendencies of people around you. You don't have to become like them. Focus on what is in the best interests of your patients and how you build people up around you, avoiding the temptation to go for the quick fix.