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Shortcake_BSn

Shortcake_BSn

Emergency Room, Critical care

Content by Shortcake_BSn

  1. Shortcake_BSn

    Humana Telephonic Nurse 2 advice?

    Thank you for the update. I live in Virginia and I applied for a couple of telephonic positions with Humana. I don't have my certification in Case Management, but my goal is to pursue my certification by the next texting quarter.
  2. Shortcake_BSn

    Are You Really a Nurse?

    To simply call myself "the RN" is not sufficient enough to the general public. I had a friend of my mothers tell me that she honestly didn't know the difference between a RN, a LPN, or a CNA. They were all letters being thrown around to her. As I stated earlier, I work in a physicians office where everyone is the nurse. They all described themselves as nurses as their job description, when they call patients to respond to messages, and to the physicians, whom also call them nurses. As someone else stated, most of their training was on the job. They have been there ten plus years. I was told that one of the medical assistants was pretty much a nurse because she went to Lpn school, she just couldn't pass her boards. The phone nurse is a medical assistant. There are about seven medical assistants, two LPNs, and four RNs in the office, yet we are all nurses. And because I am the new nurse on the block, I am constantly referred to as the medical assistant's that has been there forever sidekick or have patients tell me that she's my supervisor. I love my coworker and she is really great at what she does but the fact that they are all perfectly fine with illegally calling themselves nurses makes me uncomfortable working there.
  3. Shortcake_BSn

    Are You Really a Nurse?

    My current situation at the doctors office that I work at. Everyone is a "nurse." I feel so offended that I went through four years of nursing school and a brutal nclex only to end up in a place where you can just call yourself a nurse and actually believe that you are one.
  4. What exactly should a registered nurse's role be in a physicians office? Sometimes I feel like an overpaid medical assistant. The RNs, LPNs, and MAs are used and viewed interchangeably at the physician's office that I work at. I honestly feel like the RN's are not being utilized properly but I could be wrong because I'm not sure. What should be the RN or LPN's role and what should be the medical assistant's?
  5. Shortcake_BSn

    How Should I Handle This Situation

    I am a Registered Nurse at a doctor's office. The office is comprised up of seven doctor's, two PA's, four registered nurses, two LPNs, and six medical assistants. Most of the doctors have at least two "nurses" working with them. I use nurses in parentheses because the medical assistants are called nurses. We are all used and viewed interchangeably. Anyway, one nurse is usually assigned to do messages, and the other nurse is assigned to bring back and work up patients. I work with a medical assistant that has been working in the office for a really long time. I am fairly new. The medical assistant loves to take messages. That's pretty much all that she wants to do. The doctor that we work for has the highest patient load in the office. We really think that she needs three nurses but that's neither here nor there. After feeling burned out after constantly being the one to run back patients, I asked my nursing supervisor if we could rotate because it really is too much to keep doing day after day. My supervisor sympathized and said that she agreed and would rotate us with running patients. This went on for about a month. This week, I have been scheduled to run patients every day, while the medical assistant does messages. So I was already upset about this. On top of that, the medical assistant gets off of work an hour early everyday (because she has to pick up her child) so for an hour I have to be the runner and the message taker and whatever messages she doesn't get to, she dumps in my box. So today, she left at her time and dumped seven messages in my box. Today was the busiest day ever. Everyone was coming in with some type of respiratory issue. So for an hour I had to bring patients back and work them up. Respond to overhead pages, and do messages. On top of whatever vaccinations and documentation my doctor needed me to do. I don't think that this is fair. Everytime she does this, I'm late getting home to my own children. I want to say something to my nursing supervisor but honestly I'm just over it. Is it even worth mentioning? And if so, how should I go about it? I was so angry that I just left without seeking out my supervisor. I wanted to wait until I got home and cooled off and then called her, but I decided that I will just get to work early and pull her to the side. What's the most professional way to go about this?
  6. Shortcake_BSn

    Registered Nurse's role in physician's office

    Thats true too. Im sure that they are too busy having to learn their own roles without having to worry about someone else's. So who regulates who does what?
  7. Shortcake_BSn

    Registered Nurse's role in physician's office

    Yes. Everyone is referred to as a nurse. By the providers, patients, and other staff. That's what I meant by the use us and view us interchangeably. I know that it's wrong, I am afraid to speak up on it though because they look at you crazy if you say you're not a nurse. An insurance rep was treated very nasty by the phone nurse after he told her he needed to talk to a licensed nurse and not a cma. But they all call themselves nurses to the patients. I don't want to say anything because a lot of them have been there a long time and really know their stuff. I don't want to appear as if I think I'm better or to make a RN vs MA post. I just want to do what I'm qualified and trained to do.
  8. Shortcake_BSn

    Registered Nurse's role in physician's office

    Ive only been there for six months. And I just graduated a year ago. I really do want to work within my scope but I'm not sure if the higher ups don't know what a rn is capable of doing or they don't care. I'm mostly bringing back patients, getting vitals, and giving injections as needed.
  9. Shortcake_BSn

    Registered Nurse's role in physician's office

    The phone nurse at my job is a medical assistant. She handles triaged and PAs. This office is extremely busy as well.
  10. Shortcake_BSn

    Bullying in nursing field does exist

    Yes. She has the right to complain. Stating that "you dislike someone" isn't complaining about their actions. It's a direct attack against that person, which I believe fell under another person's definition of what bullying is...
  11. Shortcake_BSn

    Whatever happened to going to school to be a nurse?

    Yes. I knew there was one more cute acronym that I was forgetting... HCAHPS í ½í¸¡ But I agree with Diane524 100 percent.
  12. Shortcake_BSn

    Bullying in nursing field does exist

    Speaking as an AA woman, I clearly understood what the acronym meant and I know that it was not used in a "racist way". I don't understand why people are so ruffled by the fact that she felt bullied. Clearly, the young woman did target her as non-English speaking person. She has a right to learn just as much as the next student. Everyone knows how hard nursing school is. I'm sure that it's amplified when it's being taught in a language other than your primary language. Yes. She could have tried to arrange one on one time with her instructors, but that still doesn't give anyone the right to give her grief because she wasn't comprehending. Furthermore, I get so sick of people stating that "the word bully gets thrown around too often." No, the victims of bullying get ignored too often by people who do not believe that they victimization falls under their criteria of what bullying is. Bullying is subjective and suicide is real. Never minimize the actions of someone that is clearly getting pleasure for making someone feel different.
  13. Shortcake_BSn

    Whatever happened to going to school to be a nurse?

    I went to school to be "just a nurse." All I wanted to do was to help people and to save lives. I have been a cna for over ten years, so I'm definitely not afraid of hard work. After graduation, I only lasted six months in a hospital. It is a business. They care more about patient satisfaction more than patient care, and they run you right into the ground. The older nurses were miserable and made eating their young a competitive game. There's so much documentation and quality assurance measurements and cute acronyms for what the hospitals feel like nurses should be doing (icare and iwatch) which has nothing to actually do with the parient's health, that takes away from caring from the patient. I have been hiding out in a doctors office until I can go back to school to become a NP. Everyday it makes me sad that I'm not in the hospital setting saving lives like I originally set out to do, But I couldn't do it for my own mental health.
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