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Bluefamily

Bluefamily

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  1. Bluefamily

    Have you worked with a GOAT in healthcare?

    The "greatest of all time" was a CNA. Before I started my nursing education, I investigated the profession by working as a CNA. Miss A was my informal "preceptor" to show the ropes as a new CNA. She had been a CNA for 25 years. Her rule of thumb was ,"Don't cut corners-ever. That was when the State comes for inspection, you don't have to remember the correct way to do something." She also showed me how to manage truly difficult patients. She practiced what she preached. She worked hard and made it all fun. 28 bedside years and a Master's degree later, I am still humbled by the time she spent with me. I haven't forgotten my CNA starting point and I am still grateful for the attention she gave me.
  2. Bluefamily

    Just Want to Cry and Quit

    I see you feel devastated by your experience. I urge you to reframe your experience. I encourage you to use your finely tuned analytical nursing skills to walk through, reflect upon your lived experience and look for the hidden gems. The title of your prose was "How can I come back to nursing after abuse by an employer". The questions I encourage you to consider are these. Did every single solitary facet of nursing fail you? Do not forget the career title labeled "nursing" is held by humans who are flawed. Did every single solitary area of your employer abuse you? Do not forget the company for whom you worked is also made up of humans who are flawed. As you know, money is the central focus of business and the health care industry is a business. As a well-educated Master's degree holding nurse leader and administrator, you know how centrally focused "money" remains. There is no amount of money that can quantify or balance out the emotions families (whether work-family or by blood) have for each other. The two will always be in conflict. As nurses typically many of us are people pleasers and came to the profession to help others. If we can't or we are prevented from giving our best, oftentimes we feel like a total failure. I encourage you to reflect on the one nurse you helped or one single incident you handled well while in your administrative position. And hang on to that memory. You never know the reverberations of that one incident. Like throwing a small pebble into a pond, the ripples extend beyond what you can see. You don't know how that one act of kindness you extended onward past what you can see. Consider the lessons you learned in your last post. Learning what NOT to do is as valuable as learning what to do. Learning how not to treat your fellow co-workers and employees is valuable for your future nursing experience. Perhaps you'll Perhaps you'll decide to be an entrepreneur and go into business for yourself. You have more than enough compassion for your future staff. Perhaps you'll work for the ANA to change advanced practice nursing policy. Perhaps you'll decide to work in the political arena so that you can apply your experience to educate lawmakers to change the nurse staffing ratios and billing practices. Do not discredit your administrative experience or your leadership MSN as useless. Acknowledge the administrative experience's devastating effects not only on you but on all the employees and the patients at that facility. It was horrible for you. But use it as a lesson of what NOT to do. You don't have to change the whole system to be a success. You just have to show great compassion and touch the heart of one other person. You did that. You did your part. You tried. You stepped up. You didn't let someone else do it for you. You made an amazing effort. The task was enormous. But you didn't fail. (Keep in mind the opposite of love is not hate. Both have an enormous passion driving action forward. The opposite of love is apathy, where you do nothing at all.) Hold your head up high. You endured the storm and you're still standing. Look at the extraordinary perspective you will bring to the table as an NP. I have every confidence you will continue to be amazing. After all, you're a nurse. 🙂
  3. Bluefamily

    Just Want to Cry and Quit

    I see that you are devastated by your experience. I urge you to reframe your experience. I encourage you to use your finely tuned analytical nursing skills to walk through your lived experience. The title of your prose was "How can I come back to nursing after abuse by an employer". The questions I encourage you to consider are these? Did every single solitary facet of nursing fail you? Do not forget the career title labeled "nursing" is held by humans who are flawed. Did every single solitary area of your employer abuse you? Do not forget the company for whom you worked is also made up of humans who are flawed. As a well-educated Master's degree holding nurse leader and administrator, you know how centrally focused "money" remains. As nurses typically many of us are people pleasers and came to the profession to help others. If we can't or areLear prevented from giving our best, oftentimes we feel like a total failure. I encourage you to reflect on the one nurse you helped while in your administrative position. And hang on to that memory. You never know the reverberations of that one incident. Like throwing a small pebble into a pond, the ripples extend beyond what you can see. You don't know how that one act of kindness you extended on past what you could see. Consider the lessons you learned in your last post. Learning what NOT to do is as valuable as learning what to do. Learning how not to treat your fellow co-workers and employees is valuable for your future nursing experience. Perhaps you'll Perhaps you'll decide to be an entrepreneur and go into business for yourself. You have more than enough compassion for your future staff. Perhaps you'll work for the ANA to change advanced practice nursing policy. Perhaps you'll decide to work in the political arena so that you can apply your experience to educate lawmakers to change the nurse staffing ratios and billing practices. Do not discredit your administrative experience or your leadership MSN as useless. Acknowledge the administrative experience's devastating effects not only on you but on all the employees and the patients at that facility. It was horrible for you. But use it as a lesson of what NOT to do. You don't have to change the whole system to be a success. You just have to show great compassion and touch the heart of one other person. You did that. You did your part. Hold your head up high. You endured the storm and you're still standing. Look at the extraordinary perspective you will bring to the table as an NP. I have every confidence you will continue to be amazing. After all, you're a nurse. 🙂
  4. Bluefamily

    Walden University's Online AGACNP Program Review

    you are more than welcome. I have finished all my classes and I am waiting for the graduation and certification exam!
  5. Bluefamily

    Walden University's Online AGACNP Program Review

    I took each of those classes one at a time, while I worked full time.
  6. Bluefamily

    FNP Board Exam--Procrastinator's edition!

    Thank for your post. I just finished my NP Program last week and will be facing the certification exam. I haven't scheduled it yet. Thank you for your encouragement!
  7. Congratulations!! That's fantastic news!
  8. Bluefamily

    Walden University's Online AGACNP Program Review

    You learn the skills through practice. Best of luck moving forward.
  9. Bluefamily

    Walden University's Online AGACNP Program Review

    Hi Julie, Congratulations on starting your advanced degree! The effort will pay off for sure. Set yourself up for success. You asked if I could share my experience with Walden's facebook groups. Unfortunately, since I am not on facebook, I cannot supply my opinion. However, fellow students have spoken very highly of the groups. Best of luck to you. :)
  10. Why would you share any of that on the internet anyway if this were a real BON complaint? There is a difference in a group assignment for your class among willing participants and then there is "borrowing" perspectives from others unaware....Do your own work. You're obviously not thinking.
  11. I say that myself coming in to work! LOL
  12. Hmmm... Calling in sick when you're not really sick.....I'll admit I was perfectly healthy and had just worked the night before. But I called in sick with no qualms about it the very next morning when I came home to find my husband dead at home from a cracked skull after he hit the bathroom sink in a fall.... ..I guess I allowed my personal problems to affect others when I did that. So yes, I have called in sick when I wasn't sick and I allowed my personal problems to affect my work attendance. And.....???? Feel guilty? nope. That is what PTO and bereavement days are for.
  13. Bluefamily

    Walden University's Online AGACNP Program Review

    I agree 100%. I am a student at Walden also and have loved the program. The complaints you may have read about "you teach yourself" and "I am reading a book to learn this"...in the real world, what is it that you do anyway? Pick up a book and learn it yourself. The "soft skills" of the program teaches you how to do that. The professors I have found to be as involved as you want them to be. They are there to guide and direct, not spoon-feed. As an experienced nurse and an adult learner, you know how you learn best. You know your strengths and weaknesses. Build on your strengths. Set yourself up for success. Even the struggle for finding preceptors ( get them lined up VERY EARLY!) is a transferrable skill for job hunting after graduation. In every area of the program (in both hard and soft skills) I've matured my practice. I've worked full time the whole way through. When I needed to take a quarter off, I did that and picked up right where I left off without losing anything except the time I took. One of my professors advised, "You earned your BSN for everyone else---- you had bills to pay, a family to raise, you had other people depending on you. You had to hurry. Your MSN is your gift to yourself. Luxuriate in the learning opportunity. This degree is because you want to know for yourself." The program isn't easy, but it's worth it. Good luck.
  14. Bluefamily

    Walden University

    Physicians have residency programs to continue honing their education following their clinical rotations. As a current NP student, I plan on entering an NP residency program to do the same. NP residency programs aren't required and there are only a few programs. I just want more experience. I know I have my patients' lives in my hands. I want to be prepared. Should the seriousness with which I take my education, be dismissed when I plan on getting the clinical and residency experience I need and want? The professors I take classes from have the degrees to back up the courses they present. I chose Walden because it works with my schedule. I am happy with the education. Even if I went to a different school, I am still responsible for learning the material. No one is spoon feeding me.