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gigglymo

gigglymo

RN
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  1. gigglymo

    New Grad Oakland Kaiser

    Thanks for replying. I moved to Oakland in January for my husband's job; after applying to 100+ positions here and hearing nothing, I wound up taking a position in Fresno and living/working there three days a week. It's hard here right now. Best of luck to you - I totally understand your frustration. Hopefully it gets better soon!
  2. gigglymo

    Is it only hard for Asn and Bsn nurses to get hired?

    I think the issue is experience and location, not degree. An inexperienced BSN in California may look 2 years before finding ANY job, while a new grad ADN in Texas may have multiple offers.
  3. gigglymo

    New Grad Oakland Kaiser

    Virgo - are you receiving responses from Kaiser's online app. process? If you've gotten through - first, congratulations, and second, I would really appreciate any tips! Thanks!
  4. gigglymo

    Can someone please appease my paranoia?

    First, I want to say that you are my exposure-to-bodily-fluids hero. (Dubious as that sounds... :)) Second, thanks to you, I will now be referring to all fluids as juice. It just makes it sound so much more friendly, ya know? Third, and most important - I really hope your TB test continues negative! (But good for you for NOT freaking out. I should take a hint. :))
  5. gigglymo

    Can someone please appease my paranoia?

    Did I think I was feeding a baby "infected" milk? No. Did this somehow turn into a "who can outgoogle who" competition? Yes. Will I post an admittedly paranoid and highly unlikely scenario when all I'm really looking for is for someone to say, "Hey! I spilled boob juice all over the place too once! No biggie!" again? Unlikely. Do I understand that the CDC and WHO rec's refer only to moms in extreme situations? Absolutely - but I was disputing the statement that moms with HIV should "never" breastfeed. That's just not true, nor is it a guarantee that HIV will be passed on to the baby. Sheesh. Once again, thanks to everyone who understood where I was coming from on this one.
  6. gigglymo

    Can someone please appease my paranoia?

    Actually, exclusive breast-feeding for the first six months is recommended by both the CDC and the WHO, if the mother is unable to formula-feed exclusively or if she lives in an area with unclean water, as proteins in breast milk as well as those in saliva and the GI tract work to denature the virus. Of course I know that upon thinking through this situation, it's in no way logical. Do YOU, in every situation, always come to the most correct and logical conclusion? I'd rather ask those who are more knowledgeable than me and who have more experience than assume that my common sense, whopping one year of nursing, critical thinking skills, and/or BSN are going to be the answer in every situation. I very much appreciate everyone who was able to look past my paranoia and realize I was being irrational, and provide words of encouragement anyway. Sometimes we all need that.
  7. The "good" vents about nursing happen at the dinner table, because if I told my family over a meal that I had a C-diff/MRSA patient with Alzheimers, schizo-affective disorder, tube feedings, an ileostomy, and q1hr blood sugars who insisted on smearing poo in his hair, plus four other patients, two of whom were admits, they would a. not understand what those words meant without extensive explanation b. wonder why I keep going back to work and c. yak their dinners. There's quite a bit of happiness on the "Nursing Success Stories" board. You might check that one out. Best of luck to you, and I hope you're happy with your career. :heartbeat:redbeathe:heartbeat
  8. There's a post like this at least once a week. If you want the sunshine and roses, then choose your posts selectively. They're out there, and you can generally tell what's what by the title. But please don't criticize from the relative safety of school - regardless of how unsheltered you may believe you are, the real world is a whole different story. This board is just as helpful (and much cheaper) than group therapy, IMHO.
  9. gigglymo

    Can someone please appease my paranoia?

    I've worked with this patient population for approximately three days. I don't have kids. Personally, I don't think comments like "How can you have be a nurse and not already know this?!?!?!?!?!" are helpful. You have peds experience. I have cardiac experience. Two totally different worlds - and while I'm clearly perfectly capable of doing the research on my own, sometimes it's helpful to hear from someone who's been there. That's why I asked.
  10. gigglymo

    Can someone please appease my paranoia?

    So as a follow-up, in case any OTHER paranoid nurses out there search a similar situation. From the CDC: "The CDC does not list human breast milk as a body fluid for which most healthcare personnel should use special handling precautions. Occupational exposure to human breast milk has not been shown to lead to transmission of HIV or HBV infection. However, because human breast milk has been implicated in transmitting HIV from mother to infant, gloves may be worn as a precaution by health care workers who are frequently exposed to breast milk (e.g., persons working in human milk banks)." I also called the AIDS Post-Exposure Hotline (judge me if you must) and the physician I spoke with said that this was an extremely...extremely....extremely...low risk situation. Apparently moms are tested during pregnancy...and if they're not, then the babies are tested at birth. An HIV+ mom wouldn't be breastfeeding, and even if she were, the risk of passing on HIV in milk comes from the fact that babies are consuming it in vast quantities as their only source of nourishment for several months...and even then, it's not a guarantee that it will be passed on. At one point, I told the Dr. that I had the distinct impression that he thought I was being paranoid and somewhat ridiculous. He said that he couldn't tell me there was NO risk, but repeated that this was not a situation where he would recommend prophylaxis, there are no documented cases of HIV being passed to an HCP this way, and repeated that this was an extremely...extremely...extremely low risk situation. Considering the above information, and the fact that the infectious disease portion of the chart said, "Nothing notable," I'm going to chalk this up to (rather massive) paranoia and a lesson learned.
  11. gigglymo

    What should I have done differently?

    Is the internship paid or unpaid? If it's unpaid, and the things you're doing are duties that would normally be done by paid staff, then they may be working you illegally. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/03/business/03intern.html Something to think about - yes, your schedule isn't what you expected. What are the odds it may change in 2 or 3 or 6 months? Is it possible that you're reacting more to the newness of the position than the awfulness of the place? New grad jobs are pretty much non-existent these days - I applied to over 100 jobs after we relocated for my husband's work, and finally found one...three hours away. Now I drive three hours, stay with a roommate, work three days a week, and drive home...every week. Please consider how tough your situation really is - there's a difference between a not-so-great work environment and one that potentially puts your license at risk. If it's the former, you may want to really give leaving some thought before risking a long period of unemployment. Unless you're independently wealthy. If that's the case, please quit immediately, and feel free to express your appreciation for my advice monetarily.
  12. gigglymo

    What would the Easter bunny put in a nurses basket?

    Blackout curtains and ear plugs, for day sleeping. Ten years of experience, condensed into pill form. A "Healthy Cooking for Night Shifters" cookbook, with meal and snack suggestions to stave off hunger and keep off the Night Shift Nine.
  13. gigglymo

    Can someone please appease my paranoia?

    No open lesions - one tiny, healing cut. I realize, intellectually, it's completely illogical, and a ton of factors would have to line up perfectly for anything to happen. I am, as I said, being totally paranoid. Probably new job, new town, and readjusting to nights aren't doing anything to help that. Thanks for giving me some perspective on this. (Do they make a prophylactic cootie shot? :)
  14. gigglymo

    Can someone please appease my paranoia?

    I pretty much came to this conclusion after I pictured the looks on the employee health nurse's face if I walked down there and asked for prophylactic HIV therapy. The CDC doesn't consider breast milk a substance that requires PPE, unless you work in a milk bank. It just helps to hear it.
  15. I was feeding another nurse's baby last night, and didn't check the cap on the bottle before the feed. The cap was on crooked and I spilled (frozen/re-warmed) breast milk on my hand. Now I'm all paranoid about various communicable diseases. Can someone please reassure me?
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