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Granuaile ADN, RN

Hospice, Corrections, SAC
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Granuaile has 11 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in Hospice, Corrections, SAC.

Granuaile's Latest Activity

  1. Granuaile

    Can nurses who work in jail make good ER nurses?

    Hello, I just wanted to provide a quick update. The advice received here was very helpful for me , and I am very grateful for it! I have been offered 2 different positions, both are similar, but at different hospitals (one is step-down, and the other is a combination of medsurg & step-down, as that hospital doesn't have a stand-alone step-down unit). One position is at a smaller hospital that is a little far away, but not as far as most of the small hospitals here. The other is in a huge, busy hospital in the downtown area. Both I'm sure would be very good opportunities. I think I might choose the job at the smaller hospital, though, as it doesn't seem like there is as much pressure to work overtime (I have another job - I don't mind working a lot, I just like variety), and more importantly, as some commenters have advised, a smaller hospital may be better for me at this point.
  2. Granuaile

    Can nurses who work in jail make good ER nurses?

    Thank you for your feedback! Yes, I have looked at smaller hospitals, but they tend to be an hour or more away, which has been the only obstacle. I have good news though, I may be able to work on a progressive care unit, and will find out by Monday, (I guess it's similar to a step down unit?) so I am keeping my fingers crossed! I know I would learn so much!
  3. Hello, I want to work in the ER. I mostly have hospice and prison experience. I started as a CNA then LPN then became RN. As an LPN in my state, there aren't too many opportunities and I was never interested in LTC, so when I became an RN my main experience was corrections and hospice (in-patient and home hospice). Anyways, I am trying to gain the appropriate experience to be a strong ER nurse candidate. My most recent experience is in inpatient hospice, and it seems it is limiting my options. I have applied for medsurg, intermediate care, ER, and ICU jobs. Really just applying for every type of bedside hospital job I can find. I have had some interviews that were/seemed very positive, but things just aren't moving along. I am working now in hospice, but hours have been scarce because our census has been low, so I am getting to the point where I can't hold out much longer. I have signed up for a couple of agencies; one has an assignment that I can start very soon in the county jail. I live in Albuquerque so it's bound to be lively. I do have a passion for working with marginalized individuals, and I am very good in a crisis. I guess I am wondering, is it a smart move to take the jail nurse contract, I mean will ER Nurse Managers see jail nursing as valuable experience? I am just kindof discouraged, and I don't have time on my side, financially. Of course, I will seek out other experience; perhaps being signed up with a couple agencies, I can get some medsurg or more acute experience. I appreciate any feedback anyone might have.
  4. Granuaile

    Hospice nursing jobs in Albuquerque or norhtern NM?

    I would recommend Presbyterian Hospice. I am a PRN RN in their inpatient hospice, where we have been having census fluctuations so even pointage nurses are not getting their hours, but I also help in their OP hospice program. Personally, I don't know if I want to do OP/home hospice full-time again - there is just so much time spent on documentation and I prefer bedside nursing. I found myself doing so much bedside care when I was a full-time home hospice nurse, and just dreading the endless (unpaid) hours spent at home charting. That particular company (that I am leaving unnamed) did tend to run it's nurses into the ground, too. But Pres is very different. I feel like they make a lot more of an effort to support their RN hospice CM's, by having PRN nurses like me jump in to help without question. Also, the environment of the main office has a very good, supportive vibe, and management is very supportive and professional. It's been awhile since your OP, but if you did move to NM, welcome!
  5. Granuaile

    New ER Nurse - Feel Like Quitting Job

    I know the OP is from awhile ago, but the topic interests me as I'll be starting a full-time ED position soon. Reading some of the replies, I agree, there are quite a few that don't seem very supportive. Working in NYC in an ED and regularly having an ICU pt plus up to 8 other patients, to any sane person, sounds down right dangerous, and 3 months in, I would imagine any nurse except one with tons of urban ED experience would be overwhelmed, and understandably so. I hope this nurse found her power and made a decision that is both empowering for her and strengthening for her practice as a nurse.
  6. Granuaile

    Question about a urine collection port

    Thank you for your reply. The Leur-lock 10mL flush I had just wouldn't connect, unless I wasn't applying enough pressure. But usually it doesn't require a hurculean effort! :-) It has a smooth, flat surface, not like the Leur-lock ports I have seen before. í ¾í´”
  7. Granuaile

    Question about a urine collection port

    Hello, I was at a home hospice visit yesterday. Working a PRN shift, not familiar with the patient. Reviewed chart before visit. Reason for visit was pt having leakage from foley. I have flushed and/or collected specimens from a few collection ports, but the only ones I have seen before are the Leur-lock type. What I didn't know ahead of time was that this foley had a different kind of collection port. I feel kinda silly, I don't even know what it is. The foley was silicone or silicone coated, and the port looked like it needed to be accessed with a needle, but I thought that silicone foleys (including their ports?) couldn't self-seal. My sterile flush with a Leur-lock tip would not work - I did try. I have included a link to an image of a foley that looks exactly like the one the patient had. Does anyone know how to access this type of port? Silicone-Elastomer Coated Latex Closed System Foley Catheter Tray, 16 FR, 1
  8. Granuaile

    Healthcare is NOT a basic human right.

    Yes, I forgot about that...two years ago, I ended up in the ER because of a kidney infection I had stubbornly attempted to treat myself, because, in part, my employer at the time did not provide health insurance and I had been denied coverage when I sought to purchase my own health insurance because of a pre-existing condition. Anyways, unfortunately it wasn't until late at night when all the Urgent Care clinics were long closed for the day that the pain became unbearable, (which is why I did not wait until the morning to go to an Urgent Care Clinic, which, even paying out of pocket, would have been much cheaper), and therefore I had no choice but to go to the ER. Anyways, my bill came to $800 to wait in the ER for 7 hours and be seen by a doctor for 30 seconds for him to tell me what I already knew (okay, so they also drew my blood and tested my urine but still that's a mighty expensive bill!), and I am quite sure part of the reason it was so expensive (it took me almost 2 years to pay off that bill) was that my ability as a "middle class" individual to pay something was used to help off-set the losses that hospitals incur as a result of providing care to those who cannot pay anything at all, or who have medicare/medicaid, etc. which does not adequately reimburse healthcare costs. Regarding the other part of your post that I quoted: Indeed, I agree, I would much rather my tax dollars be spent on healthcare than more tanks.
  9. Granuaile

    Healthcare is NOT a basic human right.

    I think you bring up an excellent point, which does not seem to be discussed enough. I personally don't know if "Universal Healthcare" is the answer, but, the corporate thieves who are running the current insurance, drug, and medical supply companies have to meet their bottom lines, which means they have to continually make a profit, but at who's expense? They are not bound by the Hippocratic Oath, nor the Nightingale Pledge. I think if somehow the greedy drug, medical supply, and insurance corporations were in some way held accountable, then things would change dramatically. I could be wrong; I am just expressing my opinion based what I know today. Lord knows I don't know everything! I am an LPN going on only 3 years, and I have only worked in prison (I am looking for a different line of nursing) since I became an LPN. Inmates, at least in my state, New Mexico, have free access to any medical care that is deemed medically necessary. I see much of that inflated sense of entitlement that others have spoken of. It is very discouraging sometimes to know that my 72 year old Mother, who worked hard all of her life, has to wait months to get in to see her Primary Care Provider, yet, an inmate has to wait usually less than a week. As well, while I do now have health insurance (over the past 20+ years, most of the time I have not had insurance, as I could not afford it, unless an employer happened to provide it, but even then it has never been provided for free), I pay approx $50/month for a high-deductible plan which means nothing is actually covered until I fulfill the $1,300 deductible. Then my insurance kicks in. Under the recent changes in health care reform, my insurance company is required to provide preventative care free of charge, but anything else I am essentially still paying out of pocket for. Thank God I rarely need to go to the doctor! Like I said before, I don't know if Universal Healthcare is the answer, but I don't think that leaving things the way they are is the answer, either.
  10. Granuaile

    Nurse shortage gains attention of White House

    I have only read part of this thread, and intend to read the rest of it (I'm on break at work now and only so much time...) but I have read comments alluding to an outright dismissal of the notion that there is a nursing shortage and comments of the difficulty that many nurses are having finding jobs. It seems that both can be true at the same time, as just because we are in a crummy economy and healthcare facilities can't afford more nurses doesn't mean that more nurses aren't needed! Also, maybe there are low censuses in some facilities because patients can't afford healthcare so aren't seeking it?!? Does that mean that they don't need health care? Anyhoo, just my two cents.
  11. LiveToLearn, Thank you for your post. You point out something that I agree is very important. The extent of meetings and letters that I wrote were far too much to describe here, of course, but in the meetings and correspondence I did take great care to fully acknowledge my part in the situation. When I first posted this thread in Feb. of last year, I was still in shock and devastation and my language reflected that. I regret using emotional language on my initial post (in Feb. 2008), as it probably sent the wrong message and presented me in a less than believable light. I wish I could post every email, letter, etc. that transpired...because I never really expected anyone to believe that I wasn't just being a sore loser. Of course that is not realistic nor would anyone be interested in reading though all of that! I guess that's the risk I took posting part of a very difficult story, is that nobody on this site knows me and plenty of people will automatically dismiss me. I have truly never experienced anything like what I went through last year. Well, not true - I have had abusive boyfriends in the past, and had an abusive supervisor when I was 20 (the director of that organization and a seasoned co-worker pointed that out to me and helped me to confront him). So, in a personal growth sense, the experience helped me to deal with those kind of people. A little tangent that I want to share - whomever reads this thread, I hope and pray that they set aside their doubts and realize that this sort of thing does happen. I have always had a deep respect for my instructors and teachers. When I was growing up, school was respite from life at home, and I loved my teachers. That has never really changed. Of course, in college, things are different, but hopefully it kind of shows that I am not quick to criticize teachers and instructors. Something really wrong has to happen. Anyways, I am not only a detail oriented person, but a big picture person, and it is my wish, as I stated before, that in the big picture my sharing what I have can help others and bring to light an issue that can and does occur. Yes, I am fortunate to be back in school, in more ways than one.
  12. Hmmmn...I'm a little confused, did you read my last post (#12)? I did not say anything about fighting the system currently or in the future - I went through that process last year and it had ultimately a positive outcome. I thought I conveyed that in my last post.
  13. Granuaile

    Nurse shortage gains attention of White House

    It seems that there are so many variations in nursing school curriculums...I am in an LPN program, and during our first quarter, one of my classmates did a catheter insertion (of course under close instructor supervision) and we will learn how to start IVs in our fourth quarter. I just completed my second quarter clinicals and my clinical instructor taught us alot about time-management and provided us with tools to help us organize our day. Under her supervision, we did procedures such as IV flushes, wound dressings, subQ injections, insulin inj's, suppositories, enemas, PO med admin, etc. By the end of second qtr. clinicals, we all had two patients. We won't ever have a full pt. load, either, but by the end of third quarter we are expected to carry three. I'm all for increasing the entry to practice requirements to an RN, but I too have heard alot about BSN programs not necessarily providing as much preparation in the hands-on procedures (some, not all of them!) which seems just as important as learning the theory behind nursing. I just hope that when this requirement is put into place, that this is accounted for.
  14. Update ~ Well, it's impossible to describe all that happened in the past year, but I wanted to provide a little update...I went through the school's formal complaint process last year, which took several months. It went all the way to the VP of Instruction. She reviewed the case file and met with the Dean (he had not been supportive of me and had acted in an unprofessional, condescending manner toward me, so I can't be sure how that meeting went with him), and then decided that there was "no just cause" for discrimination on the basis of my learning deficits and ADHD. Without actually conducting an investigation to substantiate my claims, I would not expect a different outcome; an investigation was not done according to her written response to me. She did, however, make several recommendations to the nursing program at my school, including a revision and clarification of the LPN Program Student Handbook, and training for the faculty in the instruction of students with learning disabilities and/or ADHD. I applied for and was accepted for advanced placement back into the program, and am nearing the end of second quarter (I was failed from clinicals at four weeks during second quarter last year). I have been doing well and had a wonderful experience in clinicals. It's been a little hard to see all of the things that I nor my classmates have not been marked down for (that I was significantly and disproportionately marked down for the last time around). But, I have re-entered the program with a fresh start, and know that even though I may never have received the formal acknowledgement from the school of the discrimination that took place, I did everything I could within reason to stand up for myself. I have chosen not to take legal action because I simply don't have the money to do so, and it seems that the program has gone through many positive changes which was one of my main motivations for speaking out about what happened to me. The instructor who discriminated against me resigned last minute, leaving the new director with two weeks to find a full-time replacement instructor. The former interim director (who also taught a couple nursing classes), known to be friends with this instructor, went on an extended leave. The new director has an open door policy and is very approachable; she listens to the students, and every time I've walked by her office, she is meeting with a student or potential student. The former interim director was known for not having time to meet with students; in fact, she gave my instructor green lights the whole way with me, though she did not respond to any of my attempts to communicate with her while the situation was occurring. None of this process has been easy, but it is my hope that my story, even though I have only shared part of it, can give another nursing student hope. Bottom line; nursing school is hard and requires a very high-level of personal responsibility. But, things that shouldn't happen still do, and I believe that if we don't take steps to speak out when things like discrimination occur, we can't expect anything to change.
  15. It's really encouraging to read this thread...I can relate so much with what so many people have said. I get very discouraged for many reasons, lack of money, etc., oh, I could go on but my break at work is over and I am so grateful for allnurses.com!!
  16. Yes, I think I understand....thankyou, it's truly good to hear that.
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