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eksolothreuthskagkouriwn

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eksolothreuthskagkouriwn's Latest Activity

  1. eksolothreuthskagkouriwn

    Confused about IV infusion that should not stop

    Hello to you all, first of all excuse any possible mistakes because I am not a native speaker of the English language. I am a nurse student and currently on my first year. So, last week in class while we were talking about IV infusions, our teacher told us to NEVER stop and IV infusion that includes Heparin, Insulin, Inotrope drugs and TPN. Well I asked why and he completely ignored my question.(That's what he do most the time, he does not really like explaining things) Of course there is a reason behind that and I would really like to know why we are not supposed to never stop the above drugs and TPN from an IV infusion. Also, it would be much appreciated if you could mention other drugs that we should never stop from running the vein because so far I only know 4 or 5 of them. Thanks!
  2. eksolothreuthskagkouriwn

    Confused about IV Infusion that should not be stopped

    Hello to you all, first of all excuse any mistake cause I am not a native speaker of the English language. I study paramedics and currently I am on my first year. So, we had a conversation at class about IV infusions and our teacher told us to NEVER stop an IV infusion that contains heparin, inotrope drugs, insulin or TPN. When I asked why he just didn't answer cause this specific teacher seems not to care at all about explaining things to his students. So I am now curious ... Why should these drugs (mentioned above included TPN) NEVER be stopped? For example, if you want to administer a bolus medication. And if you are aware, I would really appreciate if you mentioned more drugs that should never be stopped while on IV infusion. I know 5 only. Thanks!
  3. eksolothreuthskagkouriwn

    Very Confused About Flushing IV Lines And Bolus Administration

    Haha good enough!! So, in the US how do you guys use the stopcocks? Where exactly? I find it really interesting that each country use devices in a different way
  4. eksolothreuthskagkouriwn

    Very Confused About Flushing IV Lines And Bolus Administration

    I didn't know that! Let me ask you a few questions if I may. 1)what if those clumps enter the blood system? Is it possible for the patient to die or to have an allergy shock? 2) I still don't understand why medicine/solution incompatability, according to what you told me, won't happen inside the blood system of the patient. It can possible happen inside the iv tubing but not inside the blood curcilation? Why? As far as I can understand if you put 2 incompatible medicines inside your blood circulation, at some point, meaning in just a few seconds, they will meet and mix up. And 3) I still cannot see why one of my two teachers who is a true professional I can promise that.. told me NOT to flush an iv peripheral that has a solution running before and after bolus administration. I asked her many times and her answer was << Nothing will really happen if you don't flush a line that has a *solution running*before-after you administer a medicine bolus.For example, if the patient has an iv bag with N/S 0,9% and electrolytes or chemotherapy medicines inside, you give the bolus medicine(she referred to an antibiotic I don't remember its name) without doing ANY flushing to the line. You flush the line ONLY if the patient has just an iv catheter on his hand with no fluids running, no bags, no nothing.just a peripheral catheter. (in English you call that a port if I am not wrong?) My teacher has been doing that for over 35 years and nothing happened as she said. She really found it crazy when I asked her about flushing peripheral lines that have fluids running. Thanks for your kind words, I am still learning you language and I try my best! I hope I didn't make you tired with my questions.
  5. Hello and first of all sorry for my bad English. I am a nurse student in Italy and right now I am on my first year. So, to get to the point quick.. From what I have learned ,we use Saline flashes(3 to 5ml) before and after we administer a bolus medication via an iv line. The reason for that is to keep the line patent and free from blood clots, medicine, etc. Now to get to my question. My(excellent) teacher has told me that you do that ONLY if the patient has a venous catheter without being connected to an iv bag,meaning without taking any iv fluids at the moment.Just a catheter itself on his hand without a bag solution. But.. another teacher taught me to do flushes before and after bolus medicine administration not only to patients I mentioned above,but also to patients that they receiving iv fluids(lets say n/s, or ringers lactated or electrolytes or whatever it doesn't matter). My question is just WHY. Supposedly, the Saline flushes are used to keep the iv line patent, but if the patient is taking iv fluids this means that his line is, obviously, patent and I can just give the bolus medication without flushing before and after. From a little research I did on the internet, I found that you are supposed to flush the iv line before and after bolus medicine administration to patients that are receiving a solution via a bag, just to make sure that INCOMPATABILITY between medicines and the solution won't happen. THIS DOESN'T MAKE SENSE AT ALL. Let's say I do what the teacher has taught and what the internet articles advice. So for example, I have a patient that right now, is receiving Ringers Lactated iv. 1) I stop the infusion,2) I flush,3) I give the bolus medicine 3)I flush again and 4)I start the infusion again.Did I prevent the possible incompatibility? Of course not!! The medicine and the solution are gonna meet and mix up inside his blood system/inside his veins literally the next second as soon as I let the Ringers solution to run again into his vein. So if the medicine I just gave is incompatible with the solution, incompatability will happen anyways, flushing or not flushing, the medicine will mix up with the solution inside his blood system in seconds. This drives me insane cause I don't know what teacher to listen to. Personally, I think that we need to flush iv lines that are not connected to any bag infusion.The reason is to prevent blood clots. I find it insane to flush an iv line that is connected to an infusion bag(N/S, dextrose etc it doesn't matter). The patient will not form blood clots, and speaking for incompatibility between medicine and solution.. It will happen inside his blood system flushing or not flushing. I hope you all understand what I am saying and again, sorry for my bad English.
  6. Hello and first of all sorry for my bad English. I am a nurse student in Italy and right now I am on my first year. So, to get to the point quick.. From what I have learned ,we use Saline flashes(3 to 5ml) before and after we administer a bolus medication via an iv line. The reason for that is to keep the line patent and free from blood clots, medicine, etc. Now to get to my question. My(excellent) teacher has told me that you do that ONLY if the patient has a venous catheter without being connected to an iv bag,meaning without taking any iv fluids at the moment.Just a catheter itself on his hand without a bag solution. But.. another teacher taught me to do flushes before and after bolus medicine administration not only to patients I mentioned above,but also to patients that they receiving iv fluids(lets say n/s, or ringers lactated or electrolytes or whatever it doesn't matter). My question is just WHY. Supposedly, the Saline flushes are used to keep the iv line patent, but if the patient is taking iv fluids this means that his line is, obviously, patent and I can just give the bolus medication without flushing before and after. From a little research I did on the internet, I found that you are supposed to flush the iv line before and after bolus medicine administration to patients that are receiving a solution via a bag, just to make sure that INCOMPATABILITY between medicines and the solution won't happen. THIS DOESN'T MAKE SENSE AT ALL. Let's say I do what the teacher has taught and what the internet articles advice. So for example, I have a patient that right now, is receiving Ringers Lactated iv. 1) I stop the infusion,2) I flush,3) I give the bolus medicine 3)I flush again and 4)I start the infusion again.Did I prevent the possible incompatibility? Of course not!! The medicine and the solution are gonna meet and mix up inside his blood system/inside his veins literally the next second as soon as I let the Ringers solution to run again into his vein. So if the medicine I just gave is incompatible with the solution, incompatability will happen anyways, flushing or not flushing, the medicine will mix up with the solution inside his blood system in seconds. This drives me insane cause I don't know what teacher to listen to. Personally, I think that we need to flush iv lines that are not connected to any bag infusion.The reason is to prevent blood clots. I find it insane to flush an iv line that is connected to an infusion bag(N/S, dextrose etc it doesn't matter). The patient will not form blood clots, and speaking for incompatibility between medicine and solution.. It will happen inside his blood system flushing or not flushing. I hope you all understand what I am saying and again, sorry for my bad English.