Nursing Student Disability

  1. I have finally received the great news that I have been accepted to a nursing program. I have completed the pre-requisites, submitted my enrollment deposit, went to the new student information session, and even ordered my uniforms for clinicals. But is this normal to have anxiety the way I do? School does not begin until next semester, but I am so nervous. I have had a lot of personal issues go on in my life including a few deaths in the family as well as an injury that is taking my focus to another direction. Will my temporary disability prevent me from starting nursing school (I must do a physical) if it is being treated with therapy? Also, I have taken some of my pre-reqs so long ago that I know I do not remember all of the material from A&P and medical micro courses. Can anyone provide input as to how essential these courses are to the new nursing information we will be receiving, or will the information come up in class that we will be needing to know?

    Lastly, I have read so many threads on here (and everywhere else online) and have read a few horrible stories about students who had to drop out of school for personal reasons or for failing. But
    , I have also read many success stories and how happy new grads are. Can any current students offer their best advice such as study tips, planning, de-stressing remedies, anxiety relief, etc that has worked for them? I am so excited and am very eager to start nursing school but I want to put my best foot forward. I have been waiting so long for this and worked so hard to get here! xo
  2. Visit MSTLUV profile page

    About MSTLUV

    Joined: Nov '14; Posts: 42; Likes: 28

    7 Comments

  3. by   MrsG, RN
    What type of disability do you have?
  4. by   LPNtoRNin2016OH
    Quote from MSTLUV
    I have finally received the great news that I have been accepted to a nursing program. I have completed the pre-requisites, submitted my enrollment deposit, went to the new student information session, and even ordered my uniforms for clinicals. But is this normal to have anxiety the way I do?
    Quote from MSTLUV

    Nursing school is always nerve wracking, so do not fret over being a bit anxious


    School does not begin until next semester, but I am so nervous. I have had a lot of personal issues go on in my life including a few deaths in the family as well as an injury that is taking my focus to another direction. Will my temporary disability prevent me from starting nursing school (I must do a physical) if it is being treated with therapy?


    This depends on your temp disability. If it will interfere with you being able to perform in clinical, it could be an issue. Would it be a better choice for you to put this off for a year in order to process your family losses (so sorry) and fully heal. I know it stinks to wait but going in 100% healthy, in mind and body, will set you up for success

    Also, I have taken some of my pre-reqs so long ago that I know I do not remember all of the material from A&P and medical micro courses. Can anyone provide input as to how essential these courses are to the new nursing information we will be receiving, or will the information come up in class that we will be needing to know?


    I would say it's pretty darn essential. At least it has been for me. I did LPN school first, had a terrible A+P course, and just finished A+P2 as a bridge student. I really understand so much more of the NCLEX type question now because I understand the actual reasoning behind them. I would review for sure

    Lastly, I have read so many threads on here (and everywhere else online) and have read a few horrible stories about students who had to drop out of school for personal reasons or for failing. But
    , I have also read many success stories and how happy new grads are. Can any current students offer their best advice such as study tips, planning, de-stressing remedies, anxiety relief, etc that has worked for them? I am so excited and am very eager to start nursing school but I want to put my best foot forward. I have been waiting so long for this and worked so hard to get here! xo
    The best advice I can give as a current student is that you have to give it all you've got. I have been through a few ups and down in my personal life while trying to get my RN degree. You can't make excuses and you have to be willing to go above and beyond what you ever thought you were capable of. I am not one of those people who just *get* science/math etc, I have to really dig in and spend a lot of time on it. Make sure you develop a studying plan that best meets your style and stick to it.

    Also making sure to eat healthy/drink plenty of water/ and get 7 hours/night (if possible) has been a major must for me. I was quite unhealthy prior to my bridge program -- I quit smoking, lost 30 lbs, and stopped eating like crap because I needed my mind to be sharp. I feel better=do better.

    I also do yoga. Otherwise, at this point, I would smoke 3 cigs at a time because the stress can be killer.

    Good luck!
  5. by   LPNtoRNin2016OH
    Apologies, have no idea why my response came out like that
  6. by   MSTLUV
    Thank you for the reply! I was involved in an auto accident a few months ago and still have back pain and headaches. I am doing physical therapy and taking meds currently for pain as needed. I have to have my physical completed and submitted and I wasn't sure as to how to go about it being that I will have to check off my conditions. Students are able to have the physical completed at the health office at the school, but will I have to bring these forms back to my PCP for medical clearance? I do experience some pain, but it will not prevent me from clinicals physically in my opinion. I was concerned that I would be dismissed or prevented from entering from the program being that I am taking pain meds and going to therapy. (But I have read a few threads with students with injuries but not pertaining to the health forms and clearance aspect)

    I have thought about putting this off, but I have been slowly taking pre-reqs since 2012 (strict job hours at the time) and did not get into my community college's RN program last year when I completed pre-reqs. I applied again this year as well as two other schools (BS) and got accepted to all 3 and I finally have my opportunity and do not want to put it off. I know if I apply myself I can do this!

    Math is not my forte so that is where my "digging into" will take place as well as the critical thinking and new testing style I keep reading about. I am generally healthy but will definitely set up a pattern for myself between now and January to develop a consistent, healthier diet and definitely sleep! LOL I can only imagine wanting those cigarettes! No apology needed!

    PS: I just ordered a Yoga DVD a few days ago from Amazon to try and get in the swing of it before school lol
  7. by   GinaJo
    I think if you want your disability taken into account most programs need you to officially register your disability
  8. by   not2bblue
    Can you stand and turn a patient, give a bath, or help someone get dressed? Most first semester nursing schools teach these basic skills and so they require some physical effort on your part, but they also have students work together to do it as they learn. Second semester and further you are to work alone though. How temporary do they expect this to be? I have a back injury from years before, they never really go away, turn the wrong way and I'm in so much pain, but I can work as long as I am mindful of proper body mechanics. I would get advice from your personal doctor. The school physical is usually just a quick look see type exam, not particularly thorough. They rely on you to tell them about stuff. Blood work for hep B, chicken pox, ect, a drug screen and VS are included. You should be ok as long as your own doc thinks it is fine.
  9. by   MSTLUV
    I am not sure how temporary it will be as I'm going through consistent therapy hoping to be 110% by the time school starts. And clinicals start our first semester unlike some schools I have read about. I am going to discuss this with my doctor just as a precautionary measure.

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