Explaining Low GPA - page 2

Hi, I'm having a bit of trouble not getting into Nursing Schools due to my undergraduate GPA being a horrible 2.23. Back then I was very depressed and suffered from anxiety because of personal... Read More

  1. by   Glucagon
    Depending on where most of your low grades cluster, you may want to try to find programs that use prereq GPA as a major factor over overall GPA or programs that look only at the GPA of your last 60 credit hours. That may help you a bit more in ranking and the evaluation. You can also try to find programs that have an essay or interview component, as that will give you a chance to explain your low GPA and how that isn't reflective of your drive or abilities (though you're going to want to have the prereq grades, especially A&P, to back up a claim that you will do better in school now).

    In exactly how you explain the low GPA, I'd say with guarded honesty and twisting it into a positive. I probably wouldn't go into the anxiety and depression and your therapist. Instead, if the root cause was a life event that happened at that time, you might say a general idea of what happened or for anything else maybe give a vague explanation and that whatever it was took your focus away from class. Maybe say something like at that time you had a hard time coping with the stress, but then twist it into something good, such as it gave you an opportunity to really develop good coping skills, naming specific things you did and still do to fix the issue. You could take it further and say that in fact, learning those skills has allowed you to become a better nursing candidate because it made you a better student and because you are are more able to deal with stressful situations properly and with clarity, something you will probably encounter often as a nurse.
  2. by   xxstarrynitesxx
    Quote from jr1991
    Both I'd like to enroll in a ABSN program but if I get accept into a traditional BSN I'm applying as a transfer student. I applied to schools in Tennessee, Philadelphia area, and Buffalo. I'm considering more schools in upstate NY. Still waiting to hear back from the schools in Buffalo (D'youville) and Tennessee (ETSU and Cumberland). Yeah I got accepted into Chamberlain in Arlington VA but I didn't get any financial aid & I was looking at paying $90k for a 2.5 year program.
    As a word of caution, financial aid for you may not be available or severely limited if you already used it getting your previous degree. I have not heard of someone going on as a transfer student after getting a degree. I am not saying has never happened, I am just simply saying that most people would try for the accelerated program.

    I personally think getting your ADN/ASN may be the best option on your expenses regardless if you need to retake some classes or not. If you do need to retake courses, this gives you the chance to really get those work hours in and save money to pay for the program. Depending on how you did in the classes you took originally, retaking classes might work out in your favor and give you a chance to raise your GPA. Keep in mind that there are applicants out there who have not faced any issues that have had an impact on their GPA. My program will allow a minimum GPA of 2.5 to apply, but there are several applicants who a 4.0. If you need to retake some classes to raise your GPA then I strongly encourage you. Once you become a nurse, this will be paid back in full. If you are cleared with the courses (hoping they side in your favor), then great.

    Hang in there. Best wishes!
  3. by   CanadianAbroad
    Stop the pity me behavior. You got into schools and you have turned them down. You have options. Stop acting as if you don't. If you want it bad enough, take out a loan and pay for school on redo your few prerequisite classes. There are many out there who have
    Never been given opportunities like you have thus far.
  4. by   JWEMT
    I agree, this is not an issue of getting into nursing school. This is about not getting into the perfect nursing school.
  5. by   jr1991
    Quote from CanadianAbroad
    Stop the pity me behavior. You got into schools and you have turned them down. You have options. Stop acting as if you don't. If you want it bad enough, take out a loan and pay for school on redo your few prerequisite classes. There are many out there who have
    Never been given opportunities like you have thus far.
    Pity me behavior??? To those people and yourself must know any logical person would second guess going to a school that is $90,000 when they are already $50,000+in debt . Also at the time I got into Chamberlain it was 3 weeks before the semester started when they told me I was accepted (this was in december). A week later I took off work, drove 3 hours down to VA to get all my federal background check and to take my HESI exam. So with less than a week to study I was able to get a decent score on my HESI. All the while I have to think about finding a place to live in a city I have never been to and quitting my 2 jobs that keep me financially afloat. If you ever been apartment shopping it takes longer than a week to get an apartment.

    In regards to the community college I'm willing to wait until after I meet with the Dean about my courses. And the only reason I requested to meet with the Dean because my friend from undergrad (who happened to be the same major same year as me therefore we took the same classes) is in the RN program and she had no problems with her credits transferring over. So after that meeting I'll decide if I'll enroll in the program with a 2 year wait period just for clinicals.

    & in my original post I asked how can I explain my bad GPA without sounding like a pity party. I have learned and grown from my mistakes from undergrad. The proof is in my post bacc grades. So frankly I don't appreciate you telling me to stop the pity behavior because never have I once asked to be pitied.
  6. by   jr1991
    Quote from xxstarrynitesxx
    As a word of caution, financial aid for you may not be available or severely limited if you already used it getting your previous degree. I have not heard of someone going on as a transfer student after getting a degree. I am not saying has never happened, I am just simply saying that most people would try for the accelerated program.

    I personally think getting your ADN/ASN may be the best option on your expenses regardless if you need to retake some classes or not. If you do need to retake courses, this gives you the chance to really get those work hours in and save money to pay for the program. Depending on how you did in the classes you took originally, retaking classes might work out in your favor and give you a chance to raise your GPA. Keep in mind that there are applicants out there who have not faced any issues that have had an impact on their GPA. My program will allow a minimum GPA of 2.5 to apply, but there are several applicants who a 4.0. If you need to retake some classes to raise your GPA then I strongly encourage you. Once you become a nurse, this will be paid back in full. If you are cleared with the courses (hoping they side in your favor), then great.

    Hang in there. Best wishes!
    Thank you! I'm hoping the Dean sides in my favor too!
  7. by   jr1991
    Quote from Glucagon
    Depending on where most of your low grades cluster, you may want to try to find programs that use prereq GPA as a major factor over overall GPA or programs that look only at the GPA of your last 60 credit hours. That may help you a bit more in ranking and the evaluation. You can also try to find programs that have an essay or interview component, as that will give you a chance to explain your low GPA and how that isn't reflective of your drive or abilities (though you're going to want to have the prereq grades, especially A&P, to back up a claim that you will do better in school now).

    In exactly how you explain the low GPA, I'd say with guarded honesty and twisting it into a positive. I probably wouldn't go into the anxiety and depression and your therapist. Instead, if the root cause was a life event that happened at that time, you might say a general idea of what happened or for anything else maybe give a vague explanation and that whatever it was took your focus away from class. Maybe say something like at that time you had a hard time coping with the stress, but then twist it into something good, such as it gave you an opportunity to really develop good coping skills, naming specific things you did and still do to fix the issue. You could take it further and say that in fact, learning those skills has allowed you to become a better nursing candidate because it made you a better student and because you are are more able to deal with stressful situations properly and with clarity, something you will probably encounter often as a nurse.
    Thank you so much for the advice! The personal statement I am talking about is optional so that's why I'm electing to write it to explain my grades. I was thinking spending a paragraph or 2 explaining the situation and then the rest of the personal statement be positive. I had my old professor read my letter and she started tearing up so thats why I knew it was too sad.
  8. by   ICUman
    You will be very thankful you did not proceed with the expensive program. That is my big regret with nursing school, an expensive private program with large loans. Good thinking and best of luck to you.
  9. by   futurenurse111
    Hi there! I totally understand the low GPA aspect, I graduated with a 2.5 BS in Exercise Science although it helped that I had to to take 3 more prerequisites which I did well in. I applied (and got into) Gwynedd Mercy's ABSN program, and had to write a personal statement explaining my GPA and why I wanted to be a nurse. I started with how my alma mater was really expensive so I worked 30 hours a week in addition to being a full-time student, and how that cut into a lot of study time. I followed up with how I learned from my mistakes and that I purposefully took a gap year working 60 hours a week to ensure that I have enough money saved to not have to work while I'm in nursing school and can fully devote myself to my studies. When you explain your depression/the personal problems you faced, brush upon the hardship but REALLY emphasize on what you're doing to get better and stay focused both currently and in the future!
  10. by   jr1991
    Thank you! I'm just taken aback because maybe I'll want to further my nursing education and that wouldn't be smart if I'm already $140,000 in debt. I did like the school though I just wish it wasn't soo expensive but what do I expect it is a for profit school.
  11. by   jr1991
    Thank you this gives me hope! I'm applying there as well and waiting to hear back! I took Inorganic Biochem because that was one of their prerequisites and even though it was hard as anything. I am still very close with the professor (hopefully he'll write me a LOR) and he gave me the opportunity to interview various doctor's about their articles submitted in medical journals.
  12. by   TerryL428
    Why are some of these people assuming that everyone has the ability to get approved for a $90K loan? Are you nuts? Don't listen to some of these negative people. I am currently in a similar situation. My undergraduate GPA is a 2.75 and most of the nursing programs where I live require a minimum GPA of 3.0 (even community colleges), and the accelerated programs require even higher. There are a couple that allow a 2.8 or higher, with an emphasis on the latter because there are still many people applying with GPAs much higher. So I'm having trouble getting in as well. I'm just continuing to take classes to boost my GPA as much a possible. I think the issue is that you did well in the prerequisites, but your CUMULATIVE GPA is not high enough for entry. I would suggest going to admissions advisors in different schools, let them look over your transcript, tell them about your circumstance, and see what advice they can give you about boosting your cumulative GPA. Was your undergraduate GPA at a different school than where you improved your GPA? If so, is it possible for you to take a couple classes as a non-matriculated student at your previous school... This may boost your previous GPA a bit.
  13. by   Neo Soldier
    I never suggest this but, have you tried applying for the lvn program at your school? It takes a year to complete and when you're done, you can bridge to the bsn or lvn-bsn.
    I think it's better than waiting to get accepted because anatomy and physio expire after about five years in some schools.
    Good luck.

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