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PRC negotiating mutual recognition deal for RP professionals

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thats why there negotiating to discuss ways and means.

I think your right. That is why there will be negotiations before the agreement. for now, Philippine law says that only Filipinos nurses can only work in the Philippines but laws can change. just think positive everybody. :)

Silverdragon102, BSN

Specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC. Has 32 years experience.

Greetings everybody!

It just seems to me Ms. Suzanne, that the reason why we don't have a reciprocity for foreign graduates to be licensed in our country is because there is actually no one that I know of who would rather work here. Why would they? The equivalent of $300 a MONTH is not exactly attractive (My brother who is a US nurse earns more than that in a day). Even for my colleagues in the Philippines, and even for that amount, there are still no jobs to be had. It doesn't make any sense for ANY foreign nurse to even want to be licensed and work in the Philippines. My country has always been there for America, and if American nurses would want to be licensed and actually work in my country, Im sure the Philippine government would be more than willing to oblige. It just wouldn't make sense at all......

That maybe true but we do see nurses posting that they would like to go to x country to gain a different experience. It should be fair to all that if a country expects another country to accept their nurses then the same should be expected back.

That maybe true but we do see nurses posting that they would like to go to x country to gain a different experience. It should be fair to all that if a country expects another country to accept their nurses then the same should be expected back.

Actually foreign nurses are allowed to practice in the Philippines.

Sec. 21. Practice Through Special/Temporary Permit.-A special/temporary permit may be issued by the Board to the following persons subject to the approval of the Commission and upon payment of the prescribed fees:

(a) Licensed nurses from foreign countries/states whose service are either for a fee or free if they are internationally well-known specialists or outstanding experts in any branch or specialty of nursing;

(b) Licensed nurses from foreign countries/states on medical mission whose services shall be free in a particular hospital, center or clinic; and

© Licensed nurses from foreign countries/states employed by schools/colleges of nursing as exchange professors in a branch or specialty of nursing;

Provided, however, That the special/temporary permit shall be effective only for the duration of the project, medical mission or employment contract.

So how in the world can your country make demands on others to do things when they do not and cannot enforce rules that they have in place.

Until they open their doors for licensure for nurses from other countries, that even trained in the Philippines and are unable to get licensed there, how in the world can they expect other countries that are in ASEAN to just accept nurses from PI with no questions asked?

Sorry, but does not work that way.

thats why its called negotiation

Greetings everybody!

It just seems to me Ms. Suzanne, that the reason why we don't have a reciprocity for foreign graduates to be licensed in our country is because there is actually no one that I know of who would rather work here. Why would they? The equivalent of $300 a MONTH is not exactly attractive (My brother who is a US nurse earns more than that in a day). Even for my colleagues in the Philippines, and even for that amount, there are still no jobs to be had. It doesn't make any sense for ANY foreign nurse to even want to be licensed and work in the Philippines. My country has always been there for America, and if American nurses would want to be licensed and actually work in my country, Im sure the Philippine government would be more than willing to oblige. It just wouldn't make sense at all......

But if you wish to go to another country to work, then it needs to go both ways; or a country is not required to accept you to get licensed there to begin with. If your country is not accepting of others, even those that went to nursing school in your country, then you cannot expect others to automatically have to accept a nurse from your country.

Things need to be corrected there first, there is no reason what so ever that close to a million students are now enrolled in nursing programs there and with a slim chance of being able to work as a nurse. There is no country that has unlimited visas for nurses and things are shrinking all over the place.

You cannot negotiate anything when things are not as they should be in your country first, and as mentioned, elections are coming up there as well.

All of the wonderful agreements that your country has arranged has been to send four year BSNs to work as care-givers in other countries, not one has been as an RN. That is something to think about as well.

To get licensed in another country, or meet their requirements to work there, you are going to need to meet their requirements. Nothing is ever automatic. Even with Canada, the nurses still have to meet the requirements for the US. Not all countries accept your license without additional work experience for licensure there, and this would still be in effect. These countries are not going to be accepting a new grad if they o not already permit it. Does not matter what your country wants to do, but when you sign for mutual recognition, then they need to accept the other nurses as well. Still do not see them doing that.

As I keep stating, everything must start at home, and this means the Philippines first.

Actually foreign nurses are allowed to practice in the Philippines.

Sec. 21. Practice Through Special/Temporary Permit.-A special/temporary permit may be issued by the Board to the following persons subject to the approval of the Commission and upon payment of the prescribed fees:

(a) Licensed nurses from foreign countries/states whose service are either for a fee or free if they are internationally well-known specialists or outstanding experts in any branch or specialty of nursing;

(b) Licensed nurses from foreign countries/states on medical mission whose services shall be free in a particular hospital, center or clinic; and

© Licensed nurses from foreign countries/states employed by schools/colleges of nursing as exchange professors in a branch or specialty of nursing;

Provided, however, That the special/temporary permit shall be effective only for the duration of the project, medical mission or employment contract.

Read again, this is for specialists only. And not for working in your hospitals, but for doing other types of work where an actual license is not even required.

Notice that it is for medical missions or for teaching, or special research projects. These nurses are not granted a license in the Philippines, and that is what we are speaking of here.

The still do not get a license issued by the PRC and that is what is going to be needed.

The above holds true in almost every other country, it is quite routine. The issue is being able to write the NLE and be granted a license from the PRC to practice there anywhere.

Graduates of programs in your country by foreign nationals are not permitted to sit for the NLE exam and therefore get licensed there. That would be the first step that needs to be changed.

One cannot expect another country to automatically accept them when they will not accept a nurse from that country.

thats why its called negotiation

You cannot negotiate until things are corrected first in your country.

Negotiations mean give and take and working out something so that it is beneficial to both sides. If the Philippines does not have something set-up to permit other foreign nurses to work there, then the other countries do not need to accept them.

And especially if the nurse trained there for four years; currently, they cannot get licensed in the Philippines. That needs to be addressed first before anything else will be accomplished.

You cannot negotiate until things are corrected first in your country.

Negotiations mean give and take and working out something so that it is beneficial to both sides. If the Philippines does not have something set-up to permit other foreign nurses to work there, then the other countries do not need to accept them.

And especially if the nurse trained there for four years; currently, they cannot get licensed in the Philippines. That needs to be addressed first before anything else will be accomplished.

why do you always contradict with our goverment . im sure before they go in the table for negotiation for thie ASEAm meber they have drafted already. and besides this has nothing to do with the US and your not here you dont kbow whats hapening. your not a meber of the PRC and you dont knw what there doing. ok please

Unfortunately, I am very aware of what is going on with the PRC almost on a daily basis. And quite familiar with what is going on with ASEAN as I used to live in a country that was a member of that group.

The other issue is that medications are also called by different names as well as lab values use different formats, so hard to just cross to another state and be able to work.

When things are of one way in a country, they can not even attempt to dictate what another country should be doing. And there is considerable difference in engineering and architecture and those types of professions from nursing.

Same way that you do not see physicians automatically getting licensed in other countries, just is not going to happen.

We see all different types of statements being made by public officials from there when they do not hold water anywhere. There are a few that came out with statements that those that flunk the NLE should just be given title of practical nurse and then permitted to work with that, not even realizing that your government does not recognize it for licensure; nor that any other country recognizes if for immigration purposes.

Suspect things will get worse again with statements like this since elections are going to be coming up there again as well.

You think that I have issues with those from the Philippines, if I did, I would not spend time with helping someone pass the NCLEX nor make decisions on what they wish to do next while wating for a chance at a visa. I actually have quite a few students that live in the Philippines that I assist almost on a daily basis. But the fact remains that your own government is trying to take advantage of the nurses there, and that needs to change first before you can expect any other country just to accept what your country wishes to do. So far they have not been successful with any of the agreements that they have signed as none have been for the RN role, only as care-givers.

Your country is first going to need to come out with the fact that they will permit a foreign national to get licensed there before they can think that another country will just permit someone to come there to work without meeting their own specific requirements first.

Dave787, she's right. The government is just keeping the status quo. They seem to be doing the least amount of work to show the public that they are supposedly working for the people. These pacts they pledge with ASEAN are a call for caregivers and not for RNs.

If the Philippines really wants to open the licensing to foreigners and allow them to practice as general RNs then I'm all for it. I don't see a reason why they would keep foreigners out. PRC already allows for RN specialists, but not for general RNs.

I wonder what the PRC or government is afraid of. It can't be because of the multitude of open RN positions in the Philippines. We both know there are probably several dozen/hundreds of applicants for every position. It can't be because of the oh-so-lofty salary of 6,000 to 9,000 pesos/month. Because we know that this barely covers daily transportation and food expenses. Can it be for the training? The training where our own government allows their hospitals to CHARGE us to volunteer? Training programs that other nations seem fit to redo with their more advance ways of doing things?

What is the use of new laws/regulations if they don't follow them? It saddens me to know how many suffer for the elite to remain in power. As citizens we need not only demand that our country change for the better, but also to oversee the changes/laws they have made are upheld. The recent scandals and questionable deals our country has made spells outright hypocrisy.

You wonder if a dictatorship is better for the country, where only the same handful of people steal from the public. Hopefully they will steal enough and leave the crumbs for the rest. While in today's government where there are a fresh group of politicians every few years who not only take the majority of our taxes, but also the crumbs.

I don't know why we keep contradicting our government? Seems like there is always something fishy going on everytime they try to negotiate something like this. No one can be trusted, their moves are so suspicious. No wonder other asian countries are racing past the Philippines, economically, financially, technologically and more. Even when we were ahead of the war stricken Vietnam, they are slowly and surely running past the Philippines this time. I am sorry but this is how I see things as of now, and I am still hoping someone along the way can champion the poor Filipinos' cause for living a better life.

You see when in politics, everyone is for himself/herself. Moreover, crab mentality always plays a role in our society.

Titanium888

Specializes in Medical surgical nursing. Has 1 years experience.

the negotiation will work if it is viable.

otherwise, it will be just like any other politicking show in the philippines.

don't get me wrong here. i'm also pinoy but suzanne has a point. she may appear concretely aggressive to you laying her opinion (based from gathered infos), but she has a point which we can all ponder on for a moment before throwing out a tantrum.

otherwise, hope is the best thing to think about regarding the negotiation.

:lghmky: keep up with the beat, no matter what happens!

I have many friends that I work with that go on medical missions for two weeks to the Philippines, some go every six months and some go every year. They are able to use their US license as they have approval from your government and are going there on a mission. And it is special documented approval, one cannot just go there and then decide to volunteer for two weeks; everything is put in place long before they go there. And this is the way that it should be.

But if they were to go there and wish to live there and work there, they would not be able to practice there. Your government does not permit it.

This is the point that I am trying to make and until your country will actually permit a foreign nurse to live and work there as an RN in one of the hospitals, then they have no right to demand anything else of any other country.

Mutual recognition is also not reciprocity; licenses would need to be obtained and the requirements met. But again, the Philippines needs to open its doors first to others.

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