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per diem jobs

Posted

Has 7 years experience.

can someone further elaborate what is a per diem job? mostly the jobs I searched online were per diem. maybe you can tell me the pros and cons

Per Diem = for the day. If they need an extra nurse or a nurse to replace one, you get to work that shift. Some per diems get a lot of work. For the most part, I would suspect that the online ads for per diem are (1) agents doing some resume "mining" (ie: they don't really have a job, they are just collecting resume's for when they do) or (2) an agent trying to fill a per diem job that is in an area that has trouble hiring nurses, and (3) someone who actually has a job and it's near you. Given the state of the economy....most likely (1) and (2).

spongebob6286, BSN, RN

Has 7 years experience.

@ silverdragon, thank you very much for those links!

so float and PRN is most likely like a per diem?

86toronado, BSN, RN

Specializes in neurology, cardiology, ED. Has 5 years experience.

Float is not necessarily a per diem, some facilities have a 'float pool' that they will use to fill holes throughout the hospital. I know plenty of people who work float pool as their full time job. PRN on the other hand is most likely a per diem position, some agencies use these terms inter-changeably.

Advantages of per diem are that it can pay a higher rate, you essentially set your own schedule, and have a minimal work commitment (it's one weekend a month where I work). Disadvantages are that there are usually no benefits associated with the position (hence the higher rate), and because you are not there much, it may take longer than usual to get used to the environment. But it could be a good way to get your foot in the door if it's someplace you really want to work.

Ginger's Mom, MSN, RN

Has 41 years experience.

Sad that is the only jobs around (per diem). It is a great way for a seasoned nurse to try out a hospital before going to a permanent system.

spongebob6286, BSN, RN

Has 7 years experience.

Float is not necessarily a per diem, some facilities have a 'float pool' that they will use to fill holes throughout the hospital. I know plenty of people who work float pool as their full time job. PRN on the other hand is most likely a per diem position, some agencies use these terms inter-changeably.

Advantages of per diem are that it can pay a higher rate, you essentially set your own schedule, and have a minimal work commitment (it's one weekend a month where I work). Disadvantages are that there are usually no benefits associated with the position (hence the higher rate), and because you are not there much, it may take longer than usual to get used to the environment. But it could be a good way to get your foot in the door if it's someplace you really want to work.

thank you for that explanation. so there is no job security for those on per diem. but can someone from per diem be eventually on a full time?

86toronado, BSN, RN

Specializes in neurology, cardiology, ED. Has 5 years experience.

Absolutely. Like I said, it would be a good way to get your foot in the door, and try a place out before you commit to a full time schedule. (but beware, too much moving around, and it may look like you can't commit at all!)

In addition to "trying out" a facility before you pursue a full-time position there, working prn gives you the opportunity to apply for open permanent positions as a "current employee," which is usually an advantage -- many facilities advertise positions internally before they are made available to the general public and prefer to hire from within.

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