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Paramedic discrimination?

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by Estateboy Estateboy (Member) Member

889 Profile Views; 39 Posts

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Orca has 24 years experience as a ADN, ASN, RN and specializes in Corrections, psychiatry, rehab, LTC.

1 Follower; 1,801 Posts; 26,279 Profile Views

On ‎4‎/‎8‎/‎2018 at 8:56 PM, Alex Egan said:

Frankly "that guy" has ruined it for you. You know "that Guy" the one who speaks poorly of nurses, thinks CNAs are to stupid to breathe, has a bad back, bad knees, bad disposition. Goes to nursing school, leave feeling like he knew everything going in. That's the guy who in orientation as a new nurse elbows in on a code that's not his, hip checks an RT to intubate, and doesn't understand why he's in trouble.

I had a nursing school classmate who was an EMT before he enrolled. He made the statement that if something happened to him, he had rather have an EMT than an RN, because EMTs know more and are better qualified to handle emergencies. Everybody in the class wanted to punch him in the face. It left me to wonder why he entered nursing school, if he already had superior knowledge.

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9 Posts; 212 Profile Views

Some hospitals (floor managers) don't hire the best and most experienced grad nurses. Sometimes they go out of their way to avoid them. I have confidence in my skills but not overconfident and proved it time and time again in clinicals. Awarded for my clinical skills and yet couldn't secure a job on the floor I worked at for more than 4 years without even the hint of a bad review. 

However, my hospital was bought by a mega corp, brought in a new manager and now all my time put into that hospital gets thrown in the trash and sad thing is new manager won't ever write me recommendation.

That's fine by me, I'll flourish somewhere else and the wrinkle face who refused to hire me will be looking for another job in a year or two. Just the way it goes. Some people are intimidated by confident people. Can't help it as I was in the military and taught to believe in my team and myself.  Sad when people lack that important attribute and actually run away from it. Have witnessed time and time again on my floor. Hire someone with no confidence so they can push them around. Funny thing is they send these scared nurses into rooms and they run out crying because they can't handle it. Don't hire someone that can do the job, hire someone you think will be your clone and your buddy. 

Sorry for the rant but I left working as a s/w engineer to go into nursing. I left there because I was under the impression that hospitals want the best and brightest. That's just simply not true.

 

Edited by NorthTXxNurse

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Seeing Myself Out has 6 years experience.

85 Posts; 1,476 Profile Views

If I'm a former paramedic I would be a much better nurse today especially dealing with emergencies. Whoever that judges you for being a paramedic is an idiot. 

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39 Posts; 889 Profile Views

After being a med-serg RN for over a year now, I find my assessment skills come in handy for identifying sepsis and other cardiac issues that other RNs have missed.   

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CYCLEPATH specializes in OBS, Cardiac, Psych.

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Drawing from personal experience I was actually told my time in EMS was valuable and interpreted by management that I should be reactive to emergencies and not buckle when things become critical on the floor. Only thought to your experience (which I find ludacris) is they are over analyzing / thinking you're too experienced and less malleable the way a new RN would be. Apply to a different department, prove you can resist the instinct to throw ET tubes and transfer to your prefered unit in 6 - 12 months time if no other hospitals around you appeal to you.    

Edited by CYCLEPATH
typo

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39 Posts; 889 Profile Views

Update.   I've been at a small hospital for 16 months now and have been floated to the ER almost a dozen times and told by staff that the ER is were I should be due to my experience and calmness.  I am also on the code team, chair the hospital sepsis team and the DON has asked me, last week  to apply to a NM position...after only 16 months an RN.   The large hospital that rejected me due to my EMS experience has lost out.   

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4 Posts; 42 Profile Views

I could not get hired at some places for nothing in the world I could offer. Other places there was no problem. I think it depends on the hiring individual themself. I just go on to the next place and follow up with any questions or interviews. I applied at locations and got turned down at a few too many I thought. Other places took a different view/ opinion.

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18 Posts; 106 Profile Views

On 1/31/2019 at 9:00 AM, 911nurs said:

That sounds crazy ! i to am well experienced working for a 911 service for 15yrs now an LVN and have found that i am hired on the spot above anyone coming out of school barley knowing how to take a b/p . I have even been given options in any position like anesthesiology tech because of my knowledge in airway adjuncts/intubation skills . It is frustrating for me as a matter of fact working with RNs that have little to very poor skills beyond taking a b/p no offense to anyone. I think that the BON should make it mandatory for nurses to have emergency skills at least a year in any 911 EMS service to have a well rounded patient care experience instead of giving continued useless college classes that you never use or very soon forget . Keep your head up they are probably jealous or intimidated of your knowledge and skills .  

Pretty sure RNs have more skills than "taking a b/p" but okay..

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