How long are orientations in your hospital?

  1. so, post your orientation length, and type of facility, how many OR's?
    Mine: level 1 trauma, about 23 or's. and they would like the orientation to be 6 months.
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    About RNOTODAY, BSN

    Joined: Jan '06; Posts: 1,074; Likes: 457

    12 Comments

  3. by   IsseyM
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    so, post your orientation length, and type of facility, how many OR's?
    Mine: level 1 trauma, about 23 or's. and they would like the orientation to be 6 months.
    Class lectures are 5-6 weeks followed by orientation which is 5 months, hospital's main OR-NO trauma, and 18-20 rooms i think.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    20 ORs, orientation is up to a year, but can be shorter.
  5. by   am17sg05
    hospital orientation is 4 weeks.unit orientation is 2 weeks but may vary.
  6. by   ortess1971
    We have 12 OR's, we don't do cardiac or heavy trauma, and they told me to expect to be on orientation until January/February..Those last 2 months are really more tying up loose ends, ie getting in whatever cases I missed. My orientation has been haphazard, because there are 4 new nurses from the floors and we are shortstaffed, so sometimes, I get pulled to scrub. Despite that, it's still been going well and I'm glad I had those years as a tech because it wasn't quite as overwhelming as it could have been..
  7. by   RNOTODAY
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    20 ORs, orientation is up to a year, but can be shorter.
    So, up to a year is not impossible, or uncommon?
    My manager told us that a year is rediculous, it should never take anyone 1 year to learn their job, and he would be very surprised if ANY hospital of any size would even make an orientation that long for anyone.He acted like it was absolutely unheard of.
    My hospital, as I said, does it all, trauma, open hearts, etc....
    TPTB wants a 6 month orientation, period. Currently the orientees are stretching it out , around 9 months, and they are unhappy
    I felt like telling them that if you had a DECENT staff that would TEACH new people the ropes,and the place got their act together, it just MIGHT be possible. I walked into a mess.......this place I am in has had no decent mgmt for years, the loonies ran the loonie bin, as I like to say... and now they are really rebelling like little kids. "we never did it like that" "since when do we do it this way" "its always been this, its always been that" ..whine whine whine........ I wish the travelers could orient me the whole time....I swear, where I am, they are the best, they are willing to teach you, they are NICE..... ah well.can we tell I had a bad day??????
  8. by   ortess1971
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    So, up to a year is not impossible, or uncommon?
    My manager told us that a year is rediculous, it should never take anyone 1 year to learn their job, and he would be very surprised if ANY hospital of any size would even make an orientation that long for anyone.He acted like it was absolutely unheard of.
    My hospital, as I said, does it all, trauma, open hearts, etc....
    TPTB wants a 6 month orientation, period. Currently the orientees are stretching it out , around 9 months, and they are unhappy
    I felt like telling them that if you had a DECENT staff that would TEACH new people the ropes,and the place got their act together, it just MIGHT be possible. I walked into a mess.......this place I am in has had no decent mgmt for years, the loonies ran the loonie bin, as I like to say... and now they are really rebelling like little kids. "we never did it like that" "since when do we do it this way" "its always been this, its always been that" ..whine whine whine........ I wish the travelers could orient me the whole time....I swear, where I am, they are the best, they are willing to teach you, they are NICE..... ah well.can we tell I had a bad day??????
    Your manager is WRONG...the orientees who are new to the OR have gotten up to a year before they are out completely on their own. The only reason mine is a little less(8-9 months) is because I was a scrub before. Even my end date is negotiable, depending on my comfort level..It comes down to this..your butt will be on the line (as well as the patient's) if you are cut loose too soon. I think I know what facility you're referring to, and they are notorious for treating new people badly..the heart team alone can't keep staff for long because of a certain doc. It sounds like they're setting you guys up for failure..Tell your manager to call my facility, they'll set him straight. PM me and I'll give you the number
  9. by   inspir8tion
    My OR program is 9 months. The first 7 weeks have been split between classroom lecture and exposure to the ORs shadowing scrubs and circulators. It is a level 1 trauma hospital. To do open heart, they require 3 additional months.
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    So, up to a year is not impossible, or uncommon?
    My manager told us that a year is rediculous, it should never take anyone 1 year to learn their job, and he would be very surprised if ANY hospital of any size would even make an orientation that long for anyone.He acted like it was absolutely unheard of.
    Your manager sounds very elitist, not to mention it sounds like he would throw people to the wolves.

    Anyway, our orientation can be up to a year, but if a person is proven proficient sooner (i.e. able to do something with no help), they can move on to the next step in training.
  11. by   RNOTODAY
    thanks marie, tess...
    thats what I thought....thanks for clarifying..
    Yes, everybody in this place will throw you to the wolves....
    They should be happy anybody at all would even consider staying after being there just one day........I think he's got alot of nerve having this attitude when the place is run like a disgrace....Its like hes clueless.
    No image, the trays are wrong, nobody in reprocessing can tell you where to get the stuff thats supposed to be there.., they literally hang the phone up on you when you call them.... "its kept in the core" "you dont need that tray" uggghhhhhh
    and that cardiac surgeon you mentioned tess. Hes so bad its actually funny. Want to hear thte latest? A pt died on the table, during a cabg. After the dust settled, he screamed out loud to everyone involved, including the PA, and anesthesia, "You people wanted him to die, that why this happened!!!!!, all of you are evil!!!!!" Now, I think thats hillarious.
  12. by   ortess1971
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    thanks marie, tess...
    thats what I thought....thanks for clarifying..
    Yes, everybody in this place will throw you to the wolves....
    They should be happy anybody at all would even consider staying after being there just one day........I think he's got alot of nerve having this attitude when the place is run like a disgrace....Its like hes clueless.
    No image, the trays are wrong, nobody in reprocessing can tell you where to get the stuff thats supposed to be there.., they literally hang the phone up on you when you call them.... "its kept in the core" "you dont need that tray" uggghhhhhh
    and that cardiac surgeon you mentioned tess. Hes so bad its actually funny. Want to hear thte latest? A pt died on the table, during a cabg. After the dust settled, he screamed out loud to everyone involved, including the PA, and anesthesia, "You people wanted him to die, that why this happened!!!!!, all of you are evil!!!!!" Now, I think thats hillarious.
    So weird that you said that! He's legendary for telling everyone in the room, "you're all killing my patient!" LOL! I do feel horrible for that pt. though.
  13. by   tinkerbell06
    My orientation is supposed to be only set up for 4 months. But I really think a year sounds like a better orientation time. There is way too much information and equipment to remember and figure out. The hospital I am at is a Level 1 Trauma Center with 18 operating rooms. A new RN definitely needs more time.
  14. by   crackerjack
    I was a new grad in May and begain working in the OR then. We had scattered classes with unit and hospital orientation for about 8 weeks then the next 6 weeks were in AORN's periop 101 course that had us running back and forth between 2 hospitals. Since then we've had orientation to specialties for 3 weeks each. The problem I'm running into is that we are a very small hospital (8 OR rooms in the main and 4 at our one-day surgery center) so even when on a specific specialty we very often end up working cases on something else so everything is very scattered. Also, due to the same small nature, we are doing a set of specialties together (ortho/cysto or gen/plastics/gyn). The last 2 weeks I've been in vascular but have only done 2 vascular cases. All that said, we are expected to be on orientation until the first of the year before we begin taking buddy call and start working on our own during regular shifts. That's flexible with our level of proficiency, can be longer as needed. However, I've been in rooms by myself a good bit lately. There's usually someone I can call on for help, usually our charge nurse - when he can be found. When I've been totally uncomfortable with doing a case on my own, I've put my foot down and insisted I have a preceptor in the room. When I'm comfortable with things, I will do the case but make sure my charge knows if I need help I'll be yelling at him down the hall but usually I talk to one of my preceptors that has been really great to work with and let her know I may need some help and she's always more than happy to help. I'm not ashamed to ask one of our techs about instruments that seem to have vanished into thin air or whatever. Most of them are great and more than happy to show me where to find something and once I've had to find something in a crunch like that, I don't forget it and can get it on my own from then on. As long as it hasn't been moved, again. Things are forever moving.

    The things I have the most trouble with are physicians or nurses that say for such and such we always do ___...and I'm good at doing what I'm told, then the next time I do what I'm told I discover *this* case is an exception and am either ridiculed for not asking/for assuming or for reading/not reading the preference cards. If I ask, I shouldn't have...if I follow the pick sheet, I shouldn't have...if i ask on the chance the preference cards is wrong, I should've read it.


    All said though, I'm feeling more comfortable and sooner than I thought I ever would. I know I still have plenty to learn and it will come with time but it's nice to know all 6 names for something and be able to put my hands on it and know who might use it and why. None of which names are written on the pkg label, of course. I'm thankful that our orientation is expected to be long, there's already enough pressure from docs, techs, residents, attendings, med students of all flavors and such to learn, do, know, etc. I'm really trying to work, find and maintain my own routine for making sure everything gets done like it should and in a timely manner and am finding that as much as my preceptors want me to learn and do, they have a hard time letting me find it and end up stepping in and sharing the work so I have a tendancy to get my room together, get meds, see the patient and run it all by her as I'm doing things while letting them know as long as they are ok, I'm ok and I'll holler when/if I need help. More and more they're ok with it and have stuck to being an outside circulator of sorts. This has worked well in that I have help if needed but can function as independently as possible and learn to shoulder the work of the entire case and be able to work solo when orientation is over. January comes soon enough! I am getting unsolicited feedback from many that I'm doing great and advancing faster than they expected for a new grad (been a loooong time since they had new grads in the OR). Still, there are the days where I feel like I stepped into quicksand and wonder if I have been making any progress at all....those days are becoming fewer and further between though.

    Ok, I know this rambled on much more than the question asked for, my apologies.

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