online NP programs

Published

I am currently doing the RN-BSN program online at Chamberlain and I love it. It's working out really well for me. When I am finished, I've been kicking around doing the NP program but I'm scared. Does anyone know how different the NP program is from the RN to BSN? I work 40 hours a week in just 3 days so that leaves me more time during the week for schooling. Plus I have a 3-year old son. Is this program right for me? There is only one school in my area that provides a NP program and I don't particularly care for this school hence me looking into Chamberlain. Any thoughts?

Specializes in Hospitalist Medicine. Has 8 years experience.
I am currently doing the RN-BSN program online at Chamberlain and I love it. It's working out really well for me. When I am finished, I've been kicking around doing the NP program but I'm scared. Does anyone know how different the NP program is from the RN to BSN? I work 40 hours a week in just 3 days so that leaves me more time during the week for schooling. Plus I have a 3-year old son. Is this program right for me? There is only one school in my area that provides a NP program and I don't particularly care for this school hence me looking into Chamberlain. Any thoughts?

I'm also doing the RN-to-BSN currently at Chamberlain. I had looked in to doing the FNP with them. Their program runs on 8 weeks sessions. In the FNP track, you take one course per 8 week session. It takes 8 semesters (16 sessions) to finish the program in its entirety. I've spoken to a few people who are currently in the program where I work and they are able to maintain working three 12 hour shifts per week while doing the non-clinical portion. Once clinicals start, you have to do a certain number of hours per week to fulfill the clinical hour obligation. 2 of them said they'll drop to part time once clinicals start (last 5 sessions of the program). The third one said she was going to continue working full time, but her children are older and can drive themselves.

You'll have to see what fits your lifestyle and if you feel you can handle doing clinicals, working full time and still have study time available.

Good luck with your decision! Join us over on the Student Nurse Practitioner forum :)

jj224

371 Posts

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 4 years experience.

I am not an NP, in NP school, or considering becoming an NP, so take this with a grain of salt. My cousin is in the Chamberlain fnp program and hates it. She regrets an online program. her biggest frustration is that she has to find her own preceptors. She can't transfer her credits anywhere (or so she says), and wishes she hadnt gone to an online school. I'm sure other people here have better insight than I do.

Specializes in ER.

Well, NP schools are notorious for not providing preceptors. Even our on campus program no longer guarantees preceptors and from some of the students, they are slightly fudging the clinical hours when they assign the students to areas. Like one nurse, her "peds" hours was in a regular urgent care. That school is a respected state school.

I am paying a group to help locate clinical preceptors for me because I don't want the headache. I have ER preceptors lined up but I need primary care and I am not that familiar with primary care because my basis is ER.

Buyer beware, BSN

1,137 Posts

Specializes in GENERAL. Has 40 years experience.

To all present and potential NP students. No matter what school you attend, You MUST nail down the preceptor situation from the start.

Preceptor is just another word for teacher. The preceptor portion of any program is required at the final third of the program. Again, and this can't be stressed enough, the competition for preceptors is outrageous.

In most markets you are competing with Medical students, other NP schools and PA schools. Some of these schools have exclusive contractual relations with the relatively few MDs and NPs who are willing to teach.

This puts you at a huge disadvantage if you attend a school that expects practitioners, who are busy running medical practices, to want to teach you gratis. (for free)

The schools that do this: ie., South University, University of Phoenix, Chamberlain and many others, tend to be, but not exclusively, the for-profits. These schools will tell you that the few available preceptors should want to teach you for free because it's the "right thing" to do. In other words for a certificate of appreciation and a handshake.

But this is not how it works. Many students are forced to pay some companies of dubious worth, who claim to be able to find you preceptors, in some cases thousands of dollars. Sometimes when you pay this money in advance, the actual preceptor reneges on the deal or doesn't even exist.

Save yourself the heartache and go to schools who can guarantee you the five preceptor sub-specialties most NP programs require. These include 1. Assessment. 2. Adult. 3. OB/GYN. 4. Pediatrics. 5. A speciality of your choice.

Usually between 700-720 hrs. These requirements will vary from program to program.

Remember that the class work, whether online or in a ground school, is the easy part for any student who is diligent, does the work and is professional and respectful of their instructors.

But to put in so much time and money into becoming an NP and then having to walk away because of the preceptor problem is a tragedy. And guess what? Few care if it's not them.

So don't be mislead by a college recruiter or your own noble but misguided dreams. Get the preceptorships in writing or you're playing Russian Roulette with a VIP---YOU.

P.S. With Preceptors issue: Don't Think, Want, Hope. You Must Know!!!