Mundane question

  1. Hi all,
    I have a small question...I am a new grad L&D nurse, and I love it, by the way. I was wondering what do all of you nurses say to your patients when you keave at the end of the shift, if they are undelivered. Also, what do you sya to the couples after they have delivered. I feel like I always say the same things to the couples. You know...Congrat and all that? Does anyone have anything more creative that they say? Thanks alot. Heather
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    About NurseHeather

    Joined: Dec '02; Posts: 31; Likes: 1
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    10 Comments

  3. by   fergus51
    When leaving I used to just explain that my time was done and introduce them to the new nurse and say I'd check on them in the morning. I always made a point of saying something complimentary about the nurse I was giving report to (You'll love Sally, she's one of the best nurses on the unit...). Sometimes I'd joke with the mom and say I bet she wished she could just pass on her work to someone else.

    I didn't have a standard thing to say when the baby was born other than to say something specific about them. Parents all seem to beam with pride when you point out anything about their baby whether it be the pretty eyes, the mop of hair or even their clearly stubborn streak (for long labor babies) or their potential as an arm wrestler in the future (I actually had one baby break my nametag he grabbed it so hard, it was caught on tape and I still laugh when I think this kid will see that when he's 15).
  4. by   SusanJean
    Quote from fergus51
    When leaving I used to just explain that my time was done and introduce them to the new nurse and say I'd check on them in the morning. I always made a point of saying something complimentary about the nurse I was giving report to (You'll love Sally, she's one of the best nurses on the unit...). Sometimes I'd joke with the mom and say I bet she wished she could just pass on her work to someone else.
    I spent a lot of time in L/D during my pregnancy and then after my son was born. Each shift change brought both nurses for the introduction of the new one and any of my concerns would be addressed. This seemed a great way to make the transition - seems you get more vested w/ your nurse in this area - than other medical areas (maybe because this is such a great time in your life.)

    I can not imagine it done any other way - this is all from a pt's perspective.
    SJ
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I try to introduce the new nurse coming on, and I ask the nurse going off to introduce me to the patient and her family. It does "break the ice" a bit when we both round together on change of shift.
  6. by   NoCrumping
    [QUOTE=NurseHeather]Hi all,
    I have a small question...I am a new grad L&D nurse, and I love it, by the way. I was wondering what do all of you nurses say to your patients when you keave at the end of the shift, if they are undelivered. Also, what do you sya to the couples after they have delivered. I feel like I always say the same things to the couples. You know...Congrat and all that? Does anyone have anything more creative that they say? Thanks alot. Heather [/QUOTE

    How about,, "you have a beautiful son/daughter".....
  7. by   NurseHeather
    [QUOTE=NoCrumping]
    Quote from NurseHeather
    Hi all,
    I have a small question...I am a new grad L&D nurse, and I love it, by the way. I was wondering what do all of you nurses say to your patients when you keave at the end of the shift, if they are undelivered. Also, what do you sya to the couples after they have delivered. I feel like I always say the same things to the couples. You know...Congrat and all that? Does anyone have anything more creative that they say? Thanks alot. Heather [/QUOTE

    How about,, "you have a beautiful son/daughter".....
    Thankyou all for your suggestions. I do say that they have a beautiful son daughter too. just was looking for more things to say. Thank you though.
  8. by   babyktchr
    When I really bond to a pt and family, and they have delivered...I thank them for allowing me to share their experience....(even after 11 years..I still cry)...if they haven't delivered, I wish them a happy birthday.
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    i do much what babyktchr does. And after nearly 8 years, I still get high and emotional during each birth.
  10. by   jennobrn01
    I try hard to find some way to compliment the way they care for their baby (if delivered). This means a lot to new moms, especially if you are specific. If undelivered and I sense the baby is coming into a good/secure family unit I say that to the mom. "This baby is lucky to be born to you...I can tell you are really going to enjoy her." something like that

    Oh and as mentioned above...allowing the pt. and family to see if you are emotionally moved never hurts. :wink2:
  11. by   breastfeedingRN
    i work postpartum, so maybe this wouldn't work in L&D, but i have little blank cards that i give them and i tell them what a pleasure it was to have them as my patient and a quick note about anything we did in particular, like struggling with breastfeeding, etc. i congratulate them on their beautiful baby and wish them luck on their journey into parenthood.

    i don't give these to all patient's though, it would probably seem ingenuine for a patient that never wanted me in the room for anything and that i didn't connect with. sometimes it is just so busy at change of shift that i can't really say what i would want to and the card lets me do that.

    Here is a sample,

    Jane and Joe,

    It was a pleasure to have you as my patient's the past 2 nights. I am so glad that breastfeeding is finally starting to click and it was fun helping you guys on your first 2 nights as Mom and Dad. Jill is a beautiful little girl, congratulations! Best of luck to you as you begin this new chapter in your life as parents! You will be great parents!

    Your Nurse
  12. by   QTBabyNurse
    If it looks like the patient will deliver shortly after change of shift, I will generally pass report to the new nurse, but stay in the delivery room to witness the birth and congratulate the parents.

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