Moms who want to feel absolutely NO pain - page 5

This is another thing I didn't realize was as common as it is-people who want to feel zip in the way of pain. granted, most women who want epidurals do say that they want to wait until the pain is... Read More

  1. by   flytern
    Some patients don't get what childbirth is all about. They want it to be like on TV, takes 23 minutes, 1 push, 50 people in attendance. They don't take the time or effort to discuss their concerns with their MD's, attend childbirth classes. All they know is family/friends horror stories.

    Many a time I've had to explain to a patient that when they are complete they will feel pain/pressure. That they have to participate in the birth of their child. I truly think they expect to go to sleep at 3cm's a wake up to a 2 day old infant. They are horrified when I won't bolus them because they can feel their legs. Their support people are also put to work supporting those very dead legs while pushing. I'm too old to keep hurting my back!
  2. by   wubbakat
    Here at my facility, request of an epidural is at the pt's discretion of when they want it. It is encouraged that they wait until labor is established before they get an epidural due to the fact that it is possible that if it turns out to be a failed induction at that time, that they could go home if there are no pressing problems, instead of their only option being a cesarean. There really hasn't been a negative response from pts when talking with them about their options, risks, benefits, etc.
  3. by   teeituptom
    Moms to be who dont want to feel any pain, shouldnt become Moms.

    I can talk my wife and had and raised 7 kiddos.

    ps. they all survived and so did we

    If they think chidbirth is rough, then who is going to raise their kids for them
  4. by   klone
    Quote from flytern
    There are side efffects from having an epidural too soon/too long. Ask any lactation consultant (not me!) Ours says if the patient has had an epidural for more than 3 hours, it really screws up the breastfeeding.
    That has not been my experience in working with breastfeeding moms. I don't believe there is anything in current breastfeeding literature that indicates breastfeeding is harder after having an epidural for more than a certain amount of time. Certainly ANY pain meds given to mom has the effect of making baby a little bit sleepier, which can make it more difficult to latch early on. But in my experience, epidurals cause fewer problems in that regard than IV narcotics.

    Here's a summary of some interesting research on the topic:

    http://www.lalecheleague.org/ba/Nov99.html
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    That belief that epidurals mess up breastfeeding is misleading and completely untrue in my experience. Any links to the information on which the LC based this remark?

    This is just not true where I work. Even in the first hour after their c/sections, moms have the option (and many do take it) to breastfeed right there, in recovery. We do everything humanly possible to make this happen, and we succeed so often, that it is one of the things I find most rewarding about my work.
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from klone
    That has not been my experience in working with breastfeeding moms. I don't believe there is anything in current breastfeeding literature that indicates breastfeeding is harder after having an epidural for more than a certain amount of time. Certainly ANY pain meds given to mom has the effect of making baby a little bit sleepier, which can make it more difficult to latch early on. But in my experience, epidurals cause fewer problems in that regard than IV narcotics.

    Here's a summary of some interesting research on the topic:

    http://www.lalecheleague.org/ba/Nov99.html
    Good post. I have read that information before, and I find my experiences correlate well with this. No one here says epidurals are risk-free, certainly.

    I have learned a lot of it is based on the attitude of the staff and the parents, as to whether BF will succeed early-on or not. Many women who truly want ZERO PAIN are the same ones who want us to take their babies immediately, and bathe them (cause they are "dirty") and want them in the nursery all night so they can sleep, without interruption. Lack of staff support can also really do a lot of harm to breastfeeding success, at least initially. Attitude is EVERYthing.

    And I also agree, IV pain meds seem to cause more trouble than regional anesthesia does. And I have even seen naturally-laboring unable to initiate immediate BF due to exhaustion or baby just not being ready to nurse vigorously. No worries, we get there, with patience and persistence. And an educated as well as committed, staff, to help make it happen.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Oct 31, '06
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    Just want to agree with Klone and Deb . . . . . epidurals, in my experience, have NO relation to success at breastfeeding. The women are NOT sleepy, as with narcotics.

    As to my own personal experience - I did get Demerol with a couple of my kids and it did absolutely nothing to dim the pain of UC's but did make me zone out in between . . but big deal, 1 1/2 minutes of zoning out and then POW, a contraction.

    My epidural with my 4th was lovely - 3 natural births was enough for me.

    And Tom dear - having pain with childbirth has nothing to do with how good a mom you will end up being. I have plenty of meth addict moms who have "natural" births and scream, yell the "F" word and don't get epidurals and turn out to be terrible moms. Enduring pain is not indicative of anything really. Except enduring the pain at that moment.

    I am not taking away anything from women who have natural births - remember I had 3. Just arguing about whether that makes you a good mom or not.

    steph
  8. by   klone
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I have learned a lot of it is based on the attitude of the staff and the parents, as to whether BF will succeed early-on or not.
    I completely and totally agree. It's funny, because it is drilled into every woman's head that if a bottle is given in the early days/weeks, it pretty much dooms the mother to failure. Yet, we have Hispanic women come in all the time, where it's culturally accepted that the mother gives formula for the first several days until the milk fully comes in, and then she switches to exclusive breastfeeding. And yet, these women seem to have no problems making this transition, and have no difficulties with breastfeeding. To Mexican women, it's culturally ingrained that they will bottle-feed for the first several days, and then switch to the breast, and that's just how it's done. And they do it. With American women, it's culturally ingrained that if their baby is given a bottle in the early days, breastfeeding won't work. So then it doesn't.

    I'm certainly not saying that this means it should be okay to give bottles to breastfed babies. Just trying to illustrate how I really believe that perception and attitude has SO MUCH influence on what a person can or cannot do, and their success at doing it.

    To correlate this to the OP, I think the same can often be said about pain in labor. If women are told that labor hurts like a SOB and they won't be able to do it without medication, then usually they won't.
  9. by   MamaMadge
    Wow! So many differing ways of doing things! At our hospital, if she gets Pitocin, she's offered all pain relief options just like any other patient. It is UP TO THE PATIENT if she wants to use them. We have many very stoic moms who absolutely do NOT want epidurals whether they are in need of Pitocin or not. While I heartily agree that no one should decide when someone gets an epidural, other than the patient herself, our job in advocating for our patient includes helping them have an unmedicated birth if that is what they choose and there is no risk to her or her baby. I think in our type of nursing we all must be flexible and remember that each and every patient, baby and birth are unique!!:spin:
  10. by   mkeep74
    I started labor at 3 am and when I got to the hospital 2 hrs later at 5am i was already 9cm and almost completely efaced. I was in so much pain that I think I resembled the girl from the exorcist. I may have actually scared the woman pushing my W/C down to L+D. She didn't stop the chair when I asked her to, and I was having a massive contraction.:spin: ( I had the good grace to feel bad after) Anyway, they immediately had me pushing but DD would not progress. I couldn't focus and couldn't even stay still, the pain was soooo bad. I was begging for an epidural, but they wouldn't give it to me, because they said the position I would have to be in for the epi would make me sit on the baby's head. After an hour of this, they finally agreed I should get the epi. Anasthesiologist comes up and they sat me up, and the pain was so excruciating from that(sitting up, I hadn't even gotten a needle yet), I couldn't make a sound nor could I even drag in a breath of air. So then they had me lay on my side and gave me the epi. (After having DD I finally wondered, if they could do it on my side, why didn't they just do that to begin with?) Anyway, once the epi was in, the very next contraction didn't hurt a bit. I could feel some pressure but it wasn't uncomfortable. They let me relax for a bit, but after a while had to give me Pitocin because my contractions were slowing down. We were still having trouble with DD progressing. However, once the MD started mentioning forceps, vacuum or CS, I got that baby out.
    My point after this long drawn out post is, I was very far along in my labor, but they were giving me a hard time about the epi. Said it was too late, but they finally consented to let me have it. That just made me feel like they were lying to me. I wasn't very trusting of anyone there after that. i agree that the epi probably slowed down my labor, but for me I think that may have been a good thing considering it onlt took 2 hours for me to completely dilate and my contractions almost ran into each other they were coming so fast. i barely had time in between to catch my breath.
    Would I ahve another baby? ABSOLUTELY!! Would I have the epi again? I'd try, but considering I seem to have fast labor, who knows. I just believe that noone should make another person feel bad for it. Pain is subjective. I would not wish that pain on anyone, so if they feel they need it I believe they should have it. It's not up to me or anyone else to tell that person how much they can endure. I do know that I told the anasthesiologist that I loved him!!!
    For me it was what made the difference to give me a chance to breath and summon my strength. And when she ws born,..... God, how beautiful.

    PS my sister in law had the epidural and it only worked on one side of her body. Yikes, that was pretty bad.

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