Athlete's version of labor

  1. Not long ago received a elder primip in labor. She arrived with a substantial birth plan and every intention of enduring a natural labor and delivery. She ended up with two nurses and at 1 cm told us she couldn't take it anymore and that labor at THAT point was worse than any of her many tri athalons, swimming from one community to an island many miles away and anything else she had ever gone through....Poor thing. I think she was so toned that her cervix couldn't relax and dialate...She eventually ended up with an epidural because she was in such good shape that her uterus pounded out the contractions.I felt so badly for her...She told me she had a renewed respect for the labor and delivery process and if everyone had to undergo that at Olympic trials there would be scant few athletes that could ever make world class! Isn't that cute???
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    About Mermaid4

    Joined: Aug '04; Posts: 339; Likes: 30
    RN labor and delivery. previously telemetry and diabetic education

    14 Comments

  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    rofl i have seen this, too.......fascinating.
  4. by   Mermaid4
    Bully for us world class (finally, in my case) ELITE althletes!!!
  5. by   TLC RN
    Too funny...I actually thought being an athlete was a help to my labor. Each contraction I would visualize myself running a wind sprint that my coaches used to make us do. To me they were pure torture...one after another w/o knowing how many he would make you do and for how long. Knowing the contractions came in intervals, it made it easer for me to manage. I knew after a bit of time, I could relax. I remember doing the sprints all you could do was find the best way to prepare you body in the short rest time to be ready to do the next sprint. This all worked good until his head actually came out...OUCH!
  6. by   fergus51
    That's a little funny. She's lucky she was able to get an epidural so early, many hospitals I have worked in wouldn't admit women that early
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    maybe she was a scheduled indx?
  8. by   fergus51
    Inductions always seem worse don't they? I would be too scared to be induced drug free.
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    yes inductions have definately made things worse, IMO. Csection rates are definately higher (national averages are approaching 25%)----and I can't help but believe that is in part to our messing w/mother nature!
  10. by   BETSRN
    Quote from Mermaid4
    Not long ago received a elder primip in labor. She arrived with a substantial birth plan and every intention of enduring a natural labor and delivery. She ended up with two nurses and at 1 cm told us she couldn't take it anymore and that labor at THAT point was worse than any of her many tri athalons, swimming from one community to an island many miles away and anything else she had ever gone through....Poor thing. I think she was so toned that her cervix couldn't relax and dialate...She eventually ended up with an epidural because she was in such good shape that her uterus pounded out the contractions.I felt so badly for her...She told me she had a renewed respect for the labor and delivery process and if everyone had to undergo that at Olympic trials there would be scant few athletes that could ever make world class! Isn't that cute???
    I think that in addition to her physical tone, her MIND was probably partly to blame for her discomfort. First you said "elderly primip". That's your first clue.She is older and more set in her ways. The fact that she had an "extensive" birth plan tells you more right there. People with extensive plans tend (sometimes) to be more INFLEXIBLE and I truly believe in the concept of mind over matter. Some of thse women will not ALLOW their bodies to do what comes naturally. I have seen this time and time again and I think you will hear consent on this from nurses all across the continuum.

    Given NO physical reason for lack of cervical change (like documented cervical stenosis from prior surgeries) often that the cervix fails to dilate because the patient fails to "let go" of her body and let it take over.

    Those peolpe are often a set-up for PP depression. We watch them carefully and make surethat they have the necessary resources after birth to call on should the need arise.
    I'm not sure I think this is "cute" (no offense meant here). I think it's sad. In my childbirth classes, I always try and help people to have the mindset so that will NOT happen if at all possible.
  11. by   bam_bam
    Sort of OT but who else hates the term "elderly primip"?

    Beth
  12. by   Mermaid4
    As one of those ancient creatures, I am not exactly thrilled with it, unless someone also introduces the partner or husband as "elderly expectant dad." Notice that NEVER happens. Since I brought this up to one doc, she now kids the dads and uses the term. Speaking of athletes and such...Just had another lovely couple ( this is a training area for long distance athletes), and when it was time for cluster feeding, mom decided (at the elderly age of 38), that she was tired and needed to rest....I should take the baby...I told her it was an ldp and the idea was to get accustomed to how it would be at home but if she was exhausted I would give her a bit of time, after she attempted to nurse her screaming child...She actually yelled at me that "it isn't all about him you know!" to which I just had to reply, oh but it is....She would flinch with feeding and her midwife told her to put on her headphones with relaxation music, have her husband stroke her arm to calm her and have the nurses put the baby to breast and let her "relax" . Lasted about two seconds with me....Enough of that nonsense..You want to breast feed, feed your OWN child....I'll help but no way am I going to do everything short of nurse him myself. Had a little discussion with our midwife and am sure I did not end up being their favorite nurse BUT still worry about that child at home....These are the people who brought their own vitamin k drops in from home.......By the time they left ( and they wanted an extra day after the vaginal delivery so the nurses could take care of the feedings while she relaxed), they were ready to throw the formerly eagerly anticipated baby out the window.."How long does THIS go on", the father actually questioned me..We need our rest.." I was kind but it will be an interesting few weeks for this poor couple....
  13. by   BETSRN
    Quote from Mermaid4
    As one of those ancient creatures, I am not exactly thrilled with it, unless someone also introduces the partner or husband as "elderly expectant dad." Notice that NEVER happens. Since I brought this up to one doc, she now kids the dads and uses the term. Speaking of athletes and such...Just had another lovely couple ( this is a training area for long distance athletes), and when it was time for cluster feeding, mom decided (at the elderly age of 38), that she was tired and needed to rest....I should take the baby...I told her it was an ldp and the idea was to get accustomed to how it would be at home but if she was exhausted I would give her a bit of time, after she attempted to nurse her screaming child...She actually yelled at me that "it isn't all about him you know!" to which I just had to reply, oh but it is....She would flinch with feeding and her midwife told her to put on her headphones with relaxation music, have her husband stroke her arm to calm her and have the nurses put the baby to breast and let her "relax" . Lasted about two seconds with me....Enough of that nonsense..You want to breast feed, feed your OWN child....I'll help but no way am I going to do everything short of nurse him myself. Had a little discussion with our midwife and am sure I did not end up being their favorite nurse BUT still worry about that child at home....These are the people who brought their own vitamin k drops in from home.......By the time they left ( and they wanted an extra day after the vaginal delivery so the nurses could take care of the feedings while she relaxed), they were ready to throw the formerly eagerly anticipated baby out the window.."How long does THIS go on", the father actually questioned me..We need our rest.." I was kind but it will be an interesting few weeks for this poor couple....
    I have to say that often these older first time couples are totally blown away by the birth and what's to come. They have NO idea how hard it is and how their life is going to change.
  14. by   Mermaid4
    I have not seen a difference with elder, mid range or young people in labor with their first child...I have, however, noticed that sometimes the older first time parents, having become accustomed to a life time of things directed toward them, have some difficulty adjusting to the schedule changes and fatigue..Labor is labor...I haven't noticed anyone liking it from age 12 to 46...So far, that is...

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