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NYSNA Union

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by Laynee Laynee (New) New

Is it really beneficial to join NYSNA? What are its benefits? Has it ever helped you?

I did some reading on their website but i'm still unsure. Is it required that once you are an RN to join a union in the first place?

How much for NYSNA deduct from your salary each payroll?

I'd really appreciate the help. I'm a new RN who just started working so i'm not familiar with all this union stuff yet.

subee, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in CRNA, Finally retired. Has 49 years experience.

NYSANA has changed over recent years. It used to be a nursing union as well as a professional organization. IMHO it has become a hard core blue collar trade union spending members' dues on dubious causes , ignoring the representation of more professional activities such as maintaining it's library. I belong to the competition ANA . Having said that, I have worked in NY SANA and non-represented hospitals and think the union hospitals provided better working conditions. But I believe it is our obligation to keep connected to the profession and it's hard not to become insulated from the larger issues without membership. Join one or the other, but do join. Go to both websites and read the newsletters. You will see the differen c email immediately.

Overland1, RN

Has 22 years experience.

Save your money and time. :)

Really??

NNOC and the California Nurses Association gained patient ratios, so nurses could care for a reasonable number of patients, have achieved pay scales unlike any place else in the US, benefits, like a pension that you can actually retire on??

What have YOU accomplished on your own??

The dues that nurses pay for representation are a pittance to what they are paid and what they recieve. Nurses all over the country can only wish they had what NNOC nurses have.

I have NO idea what you got your knickers in a wad about the NNOC.

JMHO and my NY $0.02

Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN (ret)

Somewhere in the PACNW

holinurse

Specializes in None yet..... Has 1 years experience.

What are you talking about or responding to? Did the previous post state anything about NNOC?!?

subee, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in CRNA, Finally retired. Has 49 years experience.

No, you didn't mention NNOC. I believe Lindarn was using it as an example of the power of the group to accomplish something as meaningful as patient ratios in California - a state where it's near impossible to get a job because she nurses are NOT leaving their hospitals.

holinurse

Specializes in None yet..... Has 1 years experience.

while on the topic....I just began working at Mt. Sinai in NYC and feel confused about the obligation (is it really an obligation?) to join NYSNA. Do you know....? Is joining NYSNA obligatory if I am working amongst -what is considered- a unionized work force? While I will (putting aside my feelings about unions) join if it clearly secures me greater security in my job, I want (perhaps it is wishful thinking) to make an informed decision and not be coerced.

A union rep who came in to speak to the group of nurses recently joining Mt. Sinai told me (I am not convinced that he actually knows what he is talking about) that it is compulsory that I join. Really???

mystory, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg. Has 9 years experience.

Mt. Sinai has a great nurse's union. Your tuition reimbursement and pension plan is one to be envied. I would love to get in there. Typically, you can't choose whether or not to join a union..because you are going to reap the benefits regardless. I have worked in union and non-union hospitals and union yielded far superior working conditions. I currently work at a non-union NS-LIJ hospital and I haven't had a weekend off in months...this is not by choice and with no extra pay. That is one example but I could go on and on. Union dues average about $100/month at most hospitals. You can usually search for the union/hospital contract online and see if suits your preferences. Best of luck!

subee, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in CRNA, Finally retired. Has 49 years experience.

I have worked at union and non-union hospitals in NYC and surrounding burbs. I wasn't happy about being forced to pay union dues at the time, but looking through the retroscope at long career, NYSNA represented nurses tended to age in place longer because of better working conditions.

Why would you not want to join and support an organization that has accomplished so much for the nursing staff at the hospital?

I firmly believe, that if one does not want to support the union that has gotten you great pay, benefits working conditions, that there should be two tiered employment- paying union members receive the higher pay, benefits, and work under better staffing ratios, and the non paying members, receive lower pay, fewer, less generous benefits, made to take more patients, etc. What is fair is fair. Not tickee, no shirtee!

JMHO and my NY $0.02

Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN (ret)

Somewhere in the PACNW

OCNRN63, RN

Specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

Why would you not want to join and support an organization that has accomplished so much for the nursing staff at the hospital?

I firmly believe, that if one does not want to support the union that has gotten you great pay, benefits working conditions, that there should be two tiered employment- paying union members receive the higher pay, benefits, and work under better staffing ratios, and the non paying members, receive lower pay, fewer, less generous benefits, made to take more patients, etc. What is fair is fair. Not tickee, no shirtee!

JMHO and my NY $0.02

Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN (ret)

Somewhere in the PACNW

Agreed.

Years ago, I worked for a HH company that was unionized, but it did allow people to opt out. What a ridiculous mess that was. The people who opted out only paid a nominal fee to the union, but the got all the benefits, raises, protections that those of us who were full fledged members received.

And who do you think were the ones who ****** and moaned about every little issue, about raises not being big enough, etc.? One of the nurses who opted out did so for religious reasons, but she was the most vocal about benefits. After several lengthy Labor/Management meetings, we went back to the other nurses and said, "This is what they've offered..." No sooner had we finished then this gal was griping. Really? Why didn't she try sitting in on the meetings, hours on end?

It didn't sit well with those of us who were doing all the work. I agree, make a two-tiered system, one for those who put everything on the line, and one for those who had no interest in working to make things better for staff.