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Nursing license question

Posted

Hey everyone! Super stressed right now! I have a Maryland RN License and I’m currently offered a job in Virginia. I know my license is a compact license but my start date has now been pushed back for another two weeks at my job because apparently my license is a single state instead of a multi state license. The MBON has always been difficult to get information and help from and is even more so now during this pandemic. I’m unsure what I am supposed to do to upgrade my license to multi state so I can start working. I assumed since my state is part of a compact state that I could just start working but apparently not. Everywhere I go to look for the answer there is no information on the exact steps I’m supposed to take so any insight would be great! Thanks!

TriciaJ, RN

Specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory. Has 40 years experience.

Is it worth just getting a Virginia license? Would the Nursys system be of any help?

JadedCPN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU. Has 15 years experience.

I'm not an expert by any means, but Maryland and VA are part of the NLC so I don't believe your Maryland license should be classified as single state at all. My understanding is that licenses are either a single state license and therefore NOT part of the compact agreement, or are part of the NCL and therefore multistate license. Perhaps my understanding is wrong though. I would probably reach out to your new employer's HR department to seek clarification; anytime I've moved states, they've always been extremely helpful in the process as they want to get me on boarded as soon as possible.

26 minutes ago, TriciaJ said:

Is it worth just getting a Virginia license? Would the Nursys system be of any help?

At this point if I don’t get a response from the MBON and I might just have to suck it up and pay to get a VA license 🤦🏽‍♀️.

21 minutes ago, JadedCPN said:

I'm not an expert by any means, but Maryland and VA are part of the NLC so I don't believe your Maryland license should be classified as single state at all. My understanding is that licenses are either a single state license and therefore NOT part of the compact agreement, or are part of the NCL and therefore multistate license. Perhaps my understanding is wrong though. I would probably reach out to your new employer's HR department to seek clarification; anytime I've moved states, they've always been extremely helpful in the process as they want to get me on boarded as soon as possible.

From my understanding VA is known for being picky about these things and require things that other states do not. I have to change my license from a single state to a multi state, I’m just struggling with exactly how I’m supposed to go about that. Do I have to apply for a new license or do I just have to declare MD my state of residence or what. I just hate there being no organization or Avenue for me to find these answers 😩

1 hour ago, Valley_girl1021 said:

From my understanding VA is known for being picky about these things and require things that other states do not. ...

In my experience with the Virginia BON, I found them easy to work with. Nor were their requirements out of line with any of the other states in which I have been licenses.

1 hour ago, Valley_girl1021 said:

... I have to change my license from a single state to a multi state, I’m just struggling with exactly how I’m supposed to go about that. Do I have to apply for a new license or do I just have to declare MD my state of residence or what. I just hate there being no organization or Avenue for me to find these answers 😩

I think this is where the problem lies. If you are not a resident of Maryland, your license is not going to grant you multi-state privileges. Nor can you just declare Maryland residency. You would have meet their residency requirements in order for your license to grant multi-state privileges. Unfortunately, you might have to apply for licensure in Virginia.

Best wishes.

3 hours ago, chare said:

In my experience with the Virginia BON, I found them easy to work with. Nor were their requirements out of line with any of the other states in which I have been licenses.

I think this is where the problem lies. If you are not a resident of Maryland, your license is not going to grant you multi-state privileges. Nor can you just declare Maryland residency. You would have meet their residency requirements in order for your license to grant multi-state privileges. Unfortunately, you might have to apply for licensure in Virginia.

Best wishes.

I’m a Maryland resident, I’m just in Virginia since my husband is stationed here. I still have a MD drivers license and address

32 minutes ago, Valley_girl1021 said:

I’m a Maryland resident, I’m just in Virginia since my husband is stationed here. I still have a MD drivers license and address

Then your primary state of residence is most likely Virginia. When you say that your husband is stationed in Virginia, is he active duty military? If so, and his home of record is Maryland, the Military Spouses Residency Relief Act should allow you to maintain your Maryland residency for income tax purposes and drivers license. However, I am unsure as to whether the Maryland BON will recognize this for the purpose of allowing you multi-state privileges.

ETA: I did find this:

Quote

The Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact, or eNLC, allows military spouses to use their state of legal residence as their home state for the privilege to practice. When tied to the Military Spouse Residency Relief Act, spouses can maintain one license in one state.

https://statepolicy.militaryonesource.mil/key-issue/interstate-compacts-to-support-license-portability

Have you detailed your situation to the Maryland BON? If so, and they are unwilling to help you, you might consider scheduling an appointment with legal services aboard your husband's duty station, they might be able to advise you how to best handle this situation.

Again, best wishes.

kp2016

Has 20 years experience.

Just because your state has a multi state license option does not mean you automatically have one. For example in the state of Kansas you need to be fingerprinted and select Multi State to change your single state license to multi state.

I would check the Maryland BON website and looking into having your current license made multi state, it normally involves fingerprints and a background check.

As a military spouse you are legally entitled to keep a home state of residence and use that license in another state, but your home state license still needs to be a multi state license.

https://NCSBN.org/2018MilitaryFactsheetFINAL.pdf

Edited by kp2016

8 hours ago, Valley_girl1021 said:

I’m a Maryland resident, I’m just in Virginia since my husband is stationed here. I still have a MD drivers license and address

I think residency requires that you actually reside in a state at least a certain minimum of time/days per year. That is true for federal tax home.

Not sure what each state has to say about it.

If you can't get in touch with the state BON's, contact your state Senators' offices and State Congressmen's offices and Governors' offices for help. Other than that, ask a newspaper or news station for help.

You might need to go in person to see if the BON offices are open.

Best wishes.

Hi-The whole NLC can be really confusing. Here is what I recommend:

  • Go to nursys.com and double check where you are licensed to practice. This information is listed on the web site.
  • Maryland has been a member of the compact for decades, so if you have been a nurse and residing in Maryland for a while, your license should be compact
  • If it isn't, it may be because you used an out of state address when applying for your Maryland license (for example: you went to nursing school in Oregon, got your first job in Oregon,decided to move, applied for a Maryland license before you had a Maryland address, and then moved to Maryland) The Maryland BON needs your Maryland address before it can issue you a compact Maryland license.

Hope this helps, and good luck with your new job.