2 glove technique? HUHH? - page 3

OK, so today one of the Respiratory therapist had some time and was nice enough to let me shadow him as he was caring for a pt that frequently decannulates. ( I work in LTACH). He put on two pair... Read More

  1. by   mom_coach_nurse
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    I use the "2 glove technique" if the girl's really skanky.
  2. by   boggle
    Calling double gloving a "Technique" is really confusing to all, especially to nursing students. A few years ago, I searched all over for some reference to support double gloving to better protect the caregiver, Infection control sites, NIH, you name it. I couldn't find anything, ...BUT... I think it all comes down to the quality and fit of the gloves you use. If your facility has lousy gloves, shame on them. Raise a fuss ...... OSHA anyone??. You would think it would be far cheaper for a facility for you to use one pair of good quality gloves to get a task done than multiple pairs of ones that rip and shread. Sigh.I can see the point of the convenience of stripping off one dirty glove and having a clean one on underneath when handling messy cleanups though. Wish I had thought of that earlier.
  3. by   Merced
    Double or even triple gloves for "code brown" makes sense also from the "smell" standpoint. I have noticed a smell of feces on my hands if I only use 1 layer of gloves; 2 or even 3 makes the job so much easier. Just peel off as you go.
  4. by   psu_213
    Quote from KelRN215
    At my old hospital, the policy was to wear sterile gloves to change trach ties... I always thought it didn't make any sense .
    Yeah...when you go to undo the ties, you will touch the pt's hair/gown/shoulders/sheets....none of which are sterile. Then again, since when do all hospital policies make sense.
  5. by   psu_213
    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    The part I loved the most is when he told you this was the "2 glove technique"
  6. by   msjellybean
    I will double glove when I'm cleaning up an especially poopy patient. Or with trach care.
  7. by   R. Obias Jr., R.N.
    Bad practice , prone to transfer of whatever the previous patient had to the next patient. A definite infection control candidate, an epidemic prone professional, if you had unexplained conditions among his patients , this could be the culprit.
  8. by   Altra
    Quote from pagaaruga
    Bad practice , prone to transfer of whatever the previous patient had to the next patient. A definite infection control candidate, an epidemic prone professional, if you had unexplained conditions among his patients , this could be the culprit.
    ???

    Assuming that gloves are removed and disposed of properly, and normal handwashing occurs between patients ... how is double-gloving an infection risk?
  9. by   wooh
    Quote from psu_213
    Yeah...when you go to undo the ties, you will touch the pt's hair/gown/shoulders/sheets....none of which are sterile. Then again, since when do all hospital policies make sense.
    Most importantly, the ties aren't sterile. Heck, the TRACH itself isn't sterile.
  10. by   anabellatx1
    Funny, I saw that too while working in the ER floor. One of the doctors did that and I thought it was interesting. I say it's rather convenient in some situations.
  11. by   R. Obias Jr., R.N.
    possibly , multiple glove technique may be applied during an operating room procedure on a single patient, on a single sterile area. When the outer glove ruptures , torn by needles , or by mere pressure exerted during procedures , it is possible to remove torn glove and continue with procedure, unless the the next pair of gloves are sterile. which I think is not because there are gloves which has powdered substance applied during production of the gloves or practiced by other professional on putting talcum on the hands to help ease the wearing of the gloves or to absorb moisture from the hands after scrubbing.These powders are foreign bodies that may enter the sterile area, may cause infection on the outcome of the procedure. In using a single glove technique, when a surgeon ruptures his gloves and the patients body fluids were able to penetrate the torn glove and comes in contact with surgeons hand , what does he do? He will be removing the torn gloves to check his hand or skin for any penetration , at this point his hand is already contaminated with patient's body fluids, will he immediately ask from the scrub nurse for an immediate replacement of the gloves , put them on his body fluid stained hands, or will he walk away from sterile area , do an immediate scrub and re-gloving before continuing procedure. This reply is for those who practice double or multiple gloving for consecutive patients, who are within operating room premises, or are conducting examinations on several patients, one after the other. If you think that I am incorrect , then explain your side, if you think I am correct then let this be a lesson , who are lazy enough to re-glove after every patient.
    Last edit by R. Obias Jr., R.N. on Aug 31, '12 : Reason: rephrase "double or multiple gloving" from a "double gloving"
  12. by   Altra
    pagaaruga, your post was the only reference to an OR environment in the entire thread ... and the only reference to the concept of multiple gloving and moving from patient to patient with the same gloves. All other replies addressed the OP's stated scenario of caring for one patient not currently in an OR setting.
  13. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from One1
    I double glove when I start IVs or foleys (sterile gloves on top for foleys). With IVs, once the site is secured with Tegaderm, I will pull off the first set of usually somewhat bloody gloves and I will still be gloved (cleanly) to label and package the blood samples. Same with foleys - once the sterile gloves come off I still am gloved to handle and package the urine sample.
    TWO layers of gloves to start an IV? How on earth do you feel a vein? Impressive, to me.

    I've never heard of using sterile gloves to start an IV, either, though....

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