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Nursing Faculty Shortage and Salaries

Nurses   (6,792 Views 42 Comments)
by Rhilogan Rhilogan (New Member) New Member

Rhilogan has 15 years experience and specializes in Internal Medicine, Nursing Education.

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You are reading page 4 of Nursing Faculty Shortage and Salaries. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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I realize this is an older thread, but I will be entering a direct-entry program (I already have a doctorate in another field - law) and am interested in entering academia, perhaps in teaching ethics/policy related courses at a nursing school. I was wondering how many of you guys who do teach have second jobs, work in clinics, etc. to supplement? I echo the sentiment here that the academic salary is way too low, and I was just wondering how many of you take on an additional job? At my school, most of the profs seem to also work at the hospitals as NPs, etc. as well. Thanks!

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33,528 Visitors; 4,412 Posts

I'll just add because I don't read it here, that there is no nursing shortage. The faculty shortage is misconstrued as well. There are too many profit driven nursing programs and too many graduates. I'd seriously consider this before you start off in this direction. Remember all of it is based on money. The people who start this "need for educator" business are the people who want to continue to profit from the big cash easily gained from heavily marketing nursing as a career. I see the tide turning soon for these schools as well. Already around me the census is dropping as word gets out there will be no job once you graduate, but you will still be stuck your loan default.

Just look at Illinois schools of nursing... scroll down, you see what I mean?

http://www.nursing.illinois.gov/education.asp#ACCREDITED

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1 Article; 2,241 Visitors; 55 Posts

I have also seen the tide turning in regards to the "nursing shortage." It's been interesting. What is happening, at least in some parts of the country, is that experienced nurses who were retired are coming out of retirement and re-entering nursing. This has changed the dynamics for new graduate nurses getting hired. Most facilities would prefer to hire an experience RN who has gone through refresher training than a new grad because of the monetary investment in hiring new grads. Additionally, trends are showing that new grads are only staying in the field for 1-2 years and are then leaving the acute care setting. So, financially, it makes sense to hire the experienced nurse.

In regards to faculty...across the board, faculty are approaching retirement. Colleges (whether public or private) are finding it difficult to recruit new faculty because of the salary. Nurses are nurses first, then educators. It is shocking to go from working 3-12 hour shifts, getting paid for all of your time, to working 5 days a week on a salary, which doesn't capture overtime, missed lunches, weekend time and time spent at home working. It is not appealing to nurses, nor is it necessarily financially possible, to take a pay cut such as what typically occurs in nursing education. Now, educators who work for hospitals make very good money. But to strictly work in the world of academia, plan on taking a pay cut.

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344 Visitors; 2 Posts

Degree held: MS, DNP

Educator Role: Assistant Professor

Salary: 82,000

State you work in: Colo

Type of Institution (College or University) Public university

Private university/college-make about $65,000; community college-$45,000; proprietary school-$66,000

Interestingly, I went back to the bedside and took a $20,000 pay cut. In my case, it would have paid to stay in education! My colleagues at the hospital are shocked at the pay cut I took-they thought I would make more at the bedside.

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joanna73 is a BSN, RN and specializes in geriatrics.

1 Article; 43,315 Visitors; 4,767 Posts

The pay scales are a rip off for experienced nurses. I'm in Canada, and nurses are Unionized, so we all receive good pay. However, once you reach the 10 year mark, you're at the top of the scale. Pathetic.

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3,315 Visitors; 30 Posts

choco80,

You are correct. Many of the professors and clinical instructors have to work a second job to supplement their teaching pay.

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