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Nursing and the Ebola Virus

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by 0.adamantite 0.adamantite (Member) Member Nurse

0.adamantite has 3 years experience and specializes in Acute Care - Adult, Med Surg, Neuro.

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You are reading page 27 of Nursing and the Ebola Virus. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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Hmmm, acknowledging that I don't want to be around anyone with a communicable disease, which would be the lesser of two evils:

1)Being around someone who I must be around 3 feet or closer to in order to risk being affected (droplet transmission), which involves droplets which are too large to be airborne for long periods of time, and quickly settle out of air. Droplet transmission can be reduced with the use of personal protective barriers, such as face masks and goggles. Measles and SARS are examples of diseases capable of droplet contact transmission.

2)or being exposed to someone with a disease which is transmitted via airborne, which stays in the environment longer, and can travel longer distances. These organisms are capable of surviving for long periods of time outside the body and are resistant to drying. Fortunately, only a limited number of diseases are capable of airborne transmission.Consider chicken pox, which could infect me from another aisle in a grocery store from a patient I don't even see, much less do I come in personal contact with.

I like my odds better with the droplet transmission route, especially if I know they are sick.

All the above again illustrates why it is not the two Atlanta patients under massive protective conditions in a state of the art facility who are the far greater threat to us than the Joe Blow who is so desperate to get to a medical facility that he will lie about his symptoms in order to get on a plane and enter the country. This is a scary disease, indeed, but if we continue to focus on Atlanta, we are really missing the point.

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macawake has 10 years experience.

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First of all, would you please stop using “droplet” and “airborne” as if they’re interchangeable. They are not.

PreventEbola.com - News

New website on Ebola, formed 8/3. Just starting to read, but worthy information.

About the new “informative” website you’ve found. First sentence I read “We’ve been telling you for a while now that the government and healthcare providers were not being honest about how Ebola can spread”. To me, this isn’t a very promising start, but I go on reading.

I then read the page about “How to prepare NOW to protect yourself”. Apparently we (the public) to be properly prepared for an outbreak, should all go out now and purchase adequate supplies of nitrile gloves, swimming goggles, gallon jars of chlorhexidine gluconate and filter masks (or really preferably self-contained breathing apparatus and TYVEK suits if we can find them and afford them).

Who’s the author of this "sage" advice? Apparently an EMT from New Jersey who is also certified in firefighting, hazardous materials, heavy rescue, advanced first aid and vehicle extrication. All very impressive but I’m not convinced that this makes him an authority on infectious diseases.

The welcome page has quite a few words in caps (internet screaming) with text like this: “You didn’t feel it or even know it took place but guess what? YOU’RE INFECTED!”

After browsing this website I have to conclude that your definition of “worthy” information vastly differs from mine.

To be blunt, I think it’s irresponsible of you as a nurse to be spreading this fear-mongering rubbish.

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1 Follower; 1 Article; 4,383 Posts; 37,888 Profile Views

Case Definition | Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever | CDC

...

If they say being within 3 feet is a risk, then that would lead one to conclude airborne transmission is the possibility.

Not airborne. DROPLET transmission MAY be a mode of transmission. If you're going to continuously claim airborne transmission is possible, at least get the terminology right. In fact, everyone in this thread that's a nurse needs to get this straight. TB is airborne. Chicken pox is airborne. Flu, cold, pertussis are transmitted via droplet.

If Ebola spreads via droplet, you basically have to be sneezed or coughed on to be at risk without touching the person. Not just in a room with them.

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

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Not airborne. DROPLET transmission MAY be a mode of transmission. If you're going to continuously claim airborne transmission is possible, at least get the terminology right. In fact, everyone in this thread that's a nurse needs to get this straight. TB is airborne. Chicken pox is airborne. Flu, cold, pertussis are transmitted via droplet.

If Ebola spreads via droplet, you basically have to be sneezed or coughed on to be at risk without touching the person. Not just in a room with them.

THANK YOU!!!! :yes:

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

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First of all, would you please stop using "droplet" and "airborne" as if they're interchangeable. They are not.

About the new "informative" website you've found. First sentence I read "We've been telling you for a while now that the government and healthcare providers were not being honest about how Ebola can spread". To me, this isn't a very promising start, but I go on reading.

I then read the page about "How to prepare NOW to protect yourself". Apparently we (the public) to be properly prepared for an outbreak, should all go out now and purchase adequate supplies of nitrile gloves, swimming goggles, gallon jars of chlorhexidine gluconate and filter masks (or really preferably self-contained breathing apparatus and TYVEK suits if we can find them and afford them).

Who's the author of this "sage" advice? Apparently an EMT from New Jersey who is also certified in firefighting, hazardous materials, heavy rescue, advanced first aid and vehicle extrication. All very impressive but I'm not convinced that this makes him an authority on infectious diseases.

The welcome page has quite a few words in caps (internet screaming) with text like this: "You didn't feel it or even know it took place but guess what? YOU'RE INFECTED!"

After browsing this website I have to conclude that your definition of "worthy" information vastly differs from mine.

To be blunt, I think it's irresponsible of you as a nurse to be spreading this fear-mongering rubbish.

Too bad I can't like THIS MORE!!

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MassED has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

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First of all, would you please stop using “droplet” and “airborne” as if they’re interchangeable. They are not.

About the new “informative” website you’ve found. First sentence I read “We’ve been telling you for a while now that the government and healthcare providers were not being honest about how Ebola can spread”. To me, this isn’t a very promising start, but I go on reading.

I then read the page about “How to prepare NOW to protect yourself”. Apparently we (the public) to be properly prepared for an outbreak, should all go out now and purchase adequate supplies of nitrile gloves, swimming goggles, gallon jars of chlorhexidine gluconate and filter masks (or really preferably self-contained breathing apparatus and TYVEK suits if we can find them and afford them).

Who’s the author of this "sage" advice? Apparently an EMT from New Jersey who is also certified in firefighting, hazardous materials, heavy rescue, advanced first aid and vehicle extrication. All very impressive but I’m not convinced that this makes him an authority on infectious diseases.

The welcome page has quite a few words in caps (internet screaming) with text like this: “You didn’t feel it or even know it took place but guess what? YOU’RE INFECTED!”

After browsing this website I have to conclude that your definition of “worthy” information vastly differs from mine.

To be blunt, I think it’s irresponsible of you as a nurse to be spreading this fear-mongering rubbish.

I think to find a site and go to the links, look up the sources, is the point. Never mind the other comments on that site, which I admit are fear mongering - but I am more interested in the links and scouring those. It's the fact that there are links.

As a side note, I did write that I was just starting to read it, so calling someone irresponsible for bringing information forward is absolutely dim-witted. It is up to you to evaluate.

For the final time, the clarification of respiratory precaution has been made. I think airborne and droplet are in order. I realize the CDC says droplet precautions. There is an argument for droplet going airborne.... hello!

http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/hcp/infection-prevention-and-control-recommendations.html

To be blunt, as a nurse, you are coming off as narrow-minded, intolerant, and stubborn.

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MassED has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

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Not airborne. DROPLET transmission MAY be a mode of transmission. If you're going to continuously claim airborne transmission is possible, at least get the terminology right. In fact, everyone in this thread that's a nurse needs to get this straight. TB is airborne. Chicken pox is airborne. Flu, cold, pertussis are transmitted via droplet.

If Ebola spreads via droplet, you basically have to be sneezed or coughed on to be at risk without touching the person. Not just in a room with them.

I wrote airborne transmission IS the possibility. The terminology is correct, but thanks for posting.

PS:

conduct procedures in an "Airborne Infection Isolation Room (AIIR) when feasible."

Hmm.... why would that be? (Because of the potential for airborne transmission?)

http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/hcp/infection-prevention-and-control-recommendations.html

Edited by MassED
common sense

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MassED has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

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No, it would lead one to conclude that DROPLET transmission is a possibility :arghh: :arghh: :arghh:

Read above response to same.... :no:

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MassED has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

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Good luck, all. I hope it all turns out for the best!

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macawake has 10 years experience.

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I think to find a site and go to the links, look up the sources, is the point. Never mind the other comments on that site, which I admit are fear mongering - but I am more interested in the links and scouring those. It's the fact that there are links.

As a side note, I did write that I was just starting to read it, so calling someone irresponsible for bringing information forward is absolutely dim-witted. It is up to you to evaluate.

For the final time, the clarification of respiratory precaution has been made. I think airborne and droplet are in order. I realize the CDC says droplet precautions. There is an argument for droplet going airborne.... hello!

Infection Prevention and Control Recommendations for Hospitalized Patients with Known or Suspected Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever in U.S. Hospitals | Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever | CDC

To be blunt, as a nurse, you are coming off as narrow-minded, intolerant, and stubborn.

I plead guilty to the stubborn part.

The reason why I'm indeed rather relentless on this subject is that I genuinely believe that the very last thing people need is to be frightened out of their wits for no good reason. An infectious disease with a high mortality rate is scary enough in and of itself. There’s really nothing to be gained by adding to that fear with unsubstantiated speculation or with misrepresentation/misinterpretation of scientific data. There’s nothing to be gained but there’s a very real risk involved, mass panic can be an ugly thing.

I just wish that every healthcare professional would critically think about the validity of the claims or information they are about to share. What a healthcare professional says on a medical issue makes an impact. When you post a link saying it contains good information, you give it your nurse stamp of approval. Evaluating the source before spreading the information is highly recommended, I’d even say it’s required. It’s not a question of censorship or fudging the truth. It’s the exact opposite. It’s a question of being very sure that the information we supply is indeed factual. It’s the responsible thing to do and in my opinion, it really boils down to: first, do no harm.

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Just to enlighten a few of us, a sneeze can send droplets as far as 200 feet per an MIT study. So in reality it is airborne if it can travel that far. Would you want to risk your life on that fact alone? Not me.

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